A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘buddhism

[NEWS] Five JSTOR Daily links: US Buddhism, Samuel Beckett, Brexit, seals, letters

  • JSTOR Daily looks at how Buddhism came to the United States, first brought by immigrants and then embraced as an alternative by the avant-garde.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the influence of the French Resistance on the playwriting of Samuel Beckett, himself a member of the underground.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the many different metaphors used to try to illuminate Brexit.
  • JSTOR Daily notes that seal-watching boat expeditions need to give the seals more privacy, to avoid overstressing them and exposing them to the risks of fatigue.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how letter-writing, as a literary form, has been so strongly associated with women and the feminine.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait reports on Supernova 2018oh in nearby galaxy UGC 4780, a star that demonstrated a most unusual bump in its light curve. Did the explosion engulf a neighbouring star?
  • Centauri Dreams reports on New Horizons as it approaches its next target, the Kuiper Belt object Ultima Thule.
  • D-Brief notes new observations of a black hole suggesting that gas around them forms not a rigid donut shape but rather a looser fountain.
  • Dead Things notes a new discovery that the icythosaur had blubber like modern cetaceans, demonstrating convergent evolution.
  • Cody Delistraty writes about changing perceptions of painter Egon Schiele.
  • Far Outliers notes how Japanese prisoners of war were often so surprised by good treatment that they reciprocated, by freely sharing information with interrogators.
  • Hornet Stories notes that, at least on Reddit, RuPaul’s Drag Race is the most discussed show currently playing on television.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that the Indian police was seeking two American evangelical Christian missionaries for aiding another to breach North Sentinel Island, both having fled the country.
  • JSTOR Daily looks back to a 1963 paper on the effects of automation on society by Leon Megginson, finding that many of his predictions were correct.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that it is a sad day for Hungary that its government was able to drive the Central European University out of Budapest into exile.
  • At Lingua Franca, Roger Shuy takes a look at the dreaded PhD oral exam. (I know that seeing other students taking it was one thing putting me off from academia.)
  • The LRB Blog takes a look at the disastrous state of politics in Honduras, with a corrupt leader deeply compromised by (among other things) a dependency upon the United States.
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at the beautiful Tibetan Buddhist religious art on display in the Ladakh settlement of Alchi.
  • Window on Eurasia notes a conference in Moscow taking a look at a Eurasianism based on a Slavic-Turkic synthesis.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at Santa Barbara in some of her many dimensions.

[ISL] Six #PEI links: Buddhism and horses, Bernier and immigration, Pogey Beach, St. Peter’s Island

  • The Buddhist community of Prince Edward Island, CBC PEI reports, runs a sanctuary for horses that gives dozens a chance to live out their lives in peace.
  • Russell Wangersky at The Guardian notes how utterly foolish the anti-immigration policies of Maxime Bernier would be for an Atlantic Canada that desperately needs people to come.
  • This CBC feature on the marine life of “Pogey Beach”, the PEI North Shore’s Tracadie Beach, is a visual delight.
  • CBC PEI reports on the rescue of two people off of the south shore’s uninhabited St. Peters Island, an island I’ve seen only from above.
  • From October 2016, I have a blog post sharing the photos I took of St. Peter’s Island from above in a flight that summer, gathering together some links about that place.
  • This Peter Rukavina blog post looking at the merits of the two outdoor pianos of Charlottetown is a delight.

[ISL] Five PEI links: Mennonites, street grids, marriage, Charlottetown, Heatherdale

  • Guardian Cities reports on how prices for land in Ontario are propelling a Mennonite migration to Prince Edward Island.
  • Peter Rukavina takes a look at the regularity, or not, of the street grids of major Island communities.
  • Civil wedding ceremonies on PEI are starting to outnumber religious ones. CBC reports.
  • A heritage log cabin in Charlottetown, dating back to the mid-19th century, is being torn down by its owner for wanting of funding to help preserve it. CBC reports.
  • Construction of the Great Enlightenment Buddhist Institute Society’s headquarters, in the eastern PEI community of Heatherdale, is being slowed down by construction and other issues. CBC reports.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: London, Halifax, Cerro Belmonte, Munich, Hong Kong

  • CBC reports on a terrible incident of racist harassment at a London, Ontario Sobeys grocery store, where one man tried to detain someone non-white as a supposed “illegal.”
  • Global News reports on a scandal in Halifax’s growing Buddhist community, of sexual improprieties by a leader, here.
  • Ozy reports on how Fidel Castro helped the Madrid suburb of Cerro Belmonte fight off an expropriation bid, here.
  • Citylab discusses the proposal for an aerial gondola in Munich, as part of that city’s mass transit system.
  • Matthew Keegan at Guardian Cities describes how feng shui remains a central feature of design and architecture in Hong Kong.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Architectuul has an extended long interview with architect Dragoljub Bakić, talking about the innovative architecture of Tito’s Yugoslavia and his experiences abroad.
  • Centauri Dreams remarks on how the new maps of Pluto can evoke the worlds of Ray Bradbury.
  • The Crux answers an interesting question: What, exactly, is a blazar?
  • D-Brief links to a study suggesting that conditions on Ross 128 b, the second-nearest potentially habitable planet, are potentially (very broadly) Earth-like.
  • Dangerous Minds shows how John Mellencamp was, in the 1970s, once a glam rocker.
  • The Finger Post shares photos from a recent visit to Naypyidaw, the very new capital of Myanmar.
  • Gizmodo explains how the detection of an energetic neutrino led to the detection of a distant blazar, marking yet another step forward for multi-messenger astronomy.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on the now-overlooked writer of supernatural fiction Vernon Lee.
  • Language Log makes an argument that acquiring fluency in Chinese language, including Chinese writing, is difficult, so difficult perhaps as to displace other cultures. Thoughts?
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money suggests that the decline of the neo-liberal world order is needed. My main concern is that neo-liberalism may well be the least bad of the potential world orders out there.
  • Lingua Franca takes a look at how Hindi and Urdu, technically separate languages, actually form two poles of a Hindustani language continuum.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a unique map of the London Underground that shows the elevation of each station.
  • Rocky Planet notes that the continuing eruption of Kilauea is going to permanently shape the lives of the people of the Big Island of Hawai’i.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that the Buddhists of Kalmykia want the Russian government to permit a visit by the Dalai Lama to their republic.
  • Writing at Worthwhile Canadian Initiative, Livio Di Matteo notes that the Trump demand NATO governments spend 4% of their GDP on defense would involve unprecedented levels of spending in Canada.

[ISL] Five Island links: John Smith, Buddhism, Easter Monday FIlipino tour, Province House, Greens

  • The death late last month of poet laureate John Smith has left the Island bereft. He was a wonderful man, and is much missed. The Guardian reports.
  • 47 acres of land have been bought near Brudenell, PEI, for a Buddhist nuns’ monastery. Buddhism is getting deep roots on the Island, I see. The Guardian reports.
  • The Filipino tradition of touring churches on Easter Monday has been transplanted to the Island. CBC reports.
  • Kevin Yarr reports on the extensive upgrades that Charlottetown’s Province House will need, even after the current emergency repairs are finished, over at CBC.
  • The Green Party is strengthening its growing roots in Atlantic Canada by appointing Island-born Jo-Ann Roberts as a deputy leader. CBC reports.