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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘buryatia

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes how TESS detected a star being torn apart by a distant black hole.
  • Centauri Dreams’ Paul Gilster looks at the past and future of the blog.
  • Crooked Timber takes on the sensitive issue of private schools in the United Kingdom.
  • The Crux considers the question of why women suffer from Alzheimer’s at a higher frequency than men.
  • D-Brief notes a study suggesting that saving the oceans of the Earth could reduce the effects of global warming by 20%.
  • Bruce Dorminey considers a paper suggesting that, if not for its volcanic resurfacing, Venus could have remained an Earth-like world to this day.
  • The Dragon’s Tale notes that NASA will deploy a cubesat in the proposed orbit of the Lunar Gateway station to make sure it is a workable orbit.
  • Andrew LePage at Drew Ex Machina looks at Soyuz T-10a, the first crewed mission to abort on the launch pad.
  • Gizmodo reports on a paper arguing that we should intentionally contaminate Mars (and other bodies?) with our world’s microbes.
  • io9 looks at how Warner Brothers is trying to control, belatedly, the discourse around the new Joker movie.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how, in industrializing London, women kidnapped children off the streets.
  • Language Hat links to a page examining the Arabic and Islamic elements in Dune.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at a new documentary examining the life of Trump mentor Roy Cohn.
  • The LRB Blog looks at how BBC protocols are preventing full discussion of public racism.
  • The Map Room Blog looks at different efforts to reimagining the subway map of New York City.
  • Marginal Revolution shares a paper claiming that increased pressure on immigrants to assimilate in Italy had positive results.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the background to George Washington’s statements about the rightful place of Jews in the United States.
  • Casey Dreier at the Planetary Society Blog looks at the political explanation of the massive increase in the planetary defense budget of NASA.
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at the Rocky Horror Show, with its celebration of sexuality (among other things).
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers why there are so many unexpected black holes in the universe.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps examines why Google Street View is not present in Germany (and Austria).
  • The Volokh Conspiracy reports on a ruling in a UK court that lying about a vasectomy negates a partner’s consent to sex.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the controversy about some Buryat intellectuals about giving the different dialects of their language too much importance.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Architectuul reports on the critical walking tours of Istanbul offered by Nazlı Tümerdem.
  • Centauri Dreams features a guest post from Alex Tolley considering the biotic potential of the subsurface ocean of Enceladus.
  • The Crux reports on how paleontologist Susie Maidment tries to precisely date dinosaur sediments.
  • D-Brief notes the success of a recent project aiming to map the far side of the Milky Way Galaxy.
  • Cody Delistraty considers the relationship between the One Percent and magicians.
  • Todd Schoepflin writes at the Everyday Sociology Blog about different sociological facts in time for the new school year.
  • Gizmodo shares a lovely extended cartoon imagining what life on Europa, and other worlds with subsurface worlds, might look like.
  • io9 features an interview with Annalee Newitz and Charlie Jane Anders on the intersection between science fiction writing and science writing.
  • JSTOR Daily briefly considers the pros and cons of seabed mining.
  • Marginal Revolution suggests that a stagnant economy could be seen as a sign of success, as the result of the exploitation of all potential for growth.
  • The NYR Daily reports on the photographs of John Edmonds, a photographer specializing in images of queer black men.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps shares a map of murders in Denmark, and an analysis of the facts behind this crime there.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on an anti-Putin shaman in Buryatia.
  • Arnold Zwicky reports on dreams of going back to school, NSFW and otherwise.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Anthropology.net shares in the debunking of the Toba catastrophe theory.
  • Architectuul features Mirena Dunu’s exploration of the architecture of the Black Sea coastal resorts of Romania, built under Communism.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about the importance of sleep hygiene and of being well-rested.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the filaments of Orion, indicators of starbirth.
  • Centauri Dreams notes how solar sails and the Falcon Heavy can be used to expedite the exploration of the solar system.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of debris marking the massive flood that most recently refilled the Mediterranean on the seafloor near Malta.
  • Lucy Ferriss at Lingua Franca uses a recent sickbed experience in Paris to explore the genesis of Bemelmans’ Madeline.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money noted recently the 15th anniversary of the American invasion of Iraq, trigger of a world-historical catastrophe.
  • The LRB Blog hosts Sara Roy’s defense of UNRWA and of the definition of the Palestinians under its case as refugees.
  • The NYR Daily notes how the regnant conservative government in Israel has been limiting funding to cultural creators who dissent from the nationalist line.
  • Roads and Kingdoms uses seven food dishes to explore the history of Malta.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why, even though dark matter is likely present in our solar system, we have not detected signs of it.
  • Daniel Little at Understanding Society examines the field of machine learning, and notes the ways in which its basic epistemology might be flawed.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the dropping of the ethnonym “Mongol” from the title of the former Buryat-Mongol autonomous republic sixty years ago still makes some Buryats unhappy.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • blogTO looks at atypically-named TTC subway stations, the ones named not after streets.
  • Centauri Dreams examines the protoplanetary disk of AU Microscopii.
  • The Dragon’s Tales looks at China’s nuclear submarine issues.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog examines the intersections between game theory and water shortages.
  • Far Outliers notes the travails of Buddhism in Buryatia and the decline of Russia’s Old Believers.
  • Geocurrents looks at rural-urban–potentially ethnic–divides in Catalonia.
  • Savage Minds examines controversies over tantra in contemporary Tibetan Buddhism.
  • Torontoist notes that the TCHC is only now investing in energy-saving repairs.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests contemporary Syria could have been Ukraine had Yanukovich been stronger, notes Belarusian opposition to a Russian military base, and notes discontent among Russia’s largely Sunni Muslims with the alliance with Iran and Syria.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • The Big Picture shares photos relating to the restoration of Cuban-American relations.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about why she uses Twitter.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a study noting the sulfur-rich environment of protostar HH 212.
  • The Dragon’s Tales reports a Chinese plan to develop a mixed fission/fusion reactor.
  • Language Log notes an example of Chinese writing in pinyin without accompanying script.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen notes the importance of Kevin Kwan’s novels about Chinese socialites.
  • Language Hat reports on an effort to save the Nuu language of South Africa.
  • Languages of the World reports on Urum, the Turkic language of Pontic Greeks.
  • Discover‘s Out There reports on the oddities of Pluto.
  • The Planetary Society Blog’s Emily Lakdawalla explains why the New Horizons data from Pluto is still being processed.
  • Spacing Toronto reports from a Vancouver porch competition.
  • Towelroad notes a married gay man with a child denied Communion at his mother’s funeral.
  • Window on Eurasia notes racism in Russia, looks at Tajikistan’s interest in the killing of its citizens in Russia, suggests Belarus is on the verge of an explosion, and examines Mongolian influence in Buryatia.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • blogTO notes a running race this summer sponsored by Nike on the Toronto Islands.
  • Centauri Dreams argues that the sustainability of technological civilizations should be taken into account by the Drake equation.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that a F-117 downed by Serbia in 1999 ended up sparking a Russian technological revolution.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the release of Windows 10, while Wave Without A Shore‘s C.J. Cherryh is unexcited.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money makes an argument against law school.
  • Marginal Revolution notes Venezuela is massively in debt to China.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes 3-D printed houses are not yet economically competitive with conventional constructions.
  • Torontoist looks at now-demolished Stollery’s at Yonge and Bloor.
  • Towelroad notes that Chilean legislators have passed a civil unions bill.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Russia sees Europe through the perspective of a pre-1914 imperialist, wonders if a Mongolian shift to the traditional script will cut off ties with Mongol peoples in Russia, and notes that a Belarusian national church is still some ways off.
  • Writing Through the Fog shares beautiful pictures from Hawai’i.
  • Zero Geography’s Mark Graham examines “informational magnetism” on Wikipedia.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining the distribution of hot Jupiters that concludes, although they might be preferentially distributed around main-sequence singletons, there’s not enough information to be sure.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that Ukraine has abandoned its non-aligned status.
  • Far Outliers notes the desires of the inhabitants of beseiged Sarajevo for, if not salvation, then flight.
  • Language Hat quotes George Szirtes on the advantages and otherwise of bilingualism.
  • Language Log looks for examples of the phrasing “end of the city limits”.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money anticipates the Nicaragua Canal.
  • Otto Pohl notes how heavily diasporic nationalities in the Stalinist Soviet Union tended to be subject to arrest.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks at advantages in storing electricity produced by solar power, links to a paper suggesting that Mexico can survive low oil prices in decent shape, and notes that treaties enabling the Nicaragua Canal are also giving China a comfortable legal position in that country.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money shows why John Romita Jr is one of the best comic book artists.
  • Spacing Toronto commemorates the 25th anniversary of the terrible Rupert Hotel fire.
  • Strange Maps looks at how often “dude” and “bro” and like words are spoken across the United States.
  • Torontoist thinks Toronto should really learn from Paris’ efforts to hinder gentrification.
  • Towelroad notes the arrest of three people in The Gambia on the charges of homosexuality.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy’s Ilya Somin makes the seemingly conventional argument that crimes against police and crimes by police should be condemned equally.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at changing ethnic and national identity among Russians in Latvia and Lithuania, suggests that Russia’s new policies on its Soviet-era border changes might destabilize the entire Soviet Union, reports a Crimean Tatar leader’s suggestion that Crimean Tatars should be recognized by law as an indigenous people of Ukraine, examines the consequences of border changes on church politics and jurisdictions, and observes Mongolia’s outreach to ethnic and religious kin in Buryatia, Tuva, and Kalmykia.