A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘canada

[ISL] Four #PEI links: Lupins, politics, elections, Pride

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  • CBC Prince Edward Island looks at the famous lupins of Prince Edward Island, here.
  • There were mixed emotions, CBC Prince Edward Island reports, as non-residents of the Abegweit First Nation at Scotchfort were allowed to vote in band elections for the first time.
  • Politicians report that, notwithstanding the lack of a formal agreement, right now it looks as if the minority Conservative government could last until 2023. CBC PEI has it.
  • The raising of the pride flag in Charlottetown follows reports of homophobia outside of the capital, as small towns like Alberton refused requests. The Guardian reports.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Hamilton, Québec City, San Jose, Tehran, Hong Kong

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  • Real estate in Hamilton, Ontario, is quite affordable by GTA standards. Global News reports.
  • Québec City has a new farmer’s market to replace an old. CBC reports.
  • San Jose, California, is set to embark on a grand experiment in cohousing, CityLab reports.
  • These vast abandoned apartment blocks in the desert outside of Tehran speak of economic underperformance, to say the least. Messynessychic has it.
  • Now that Hong Kong has not just competition from other cities in China but is finding itself outmatched by the likes of Shenzhen and Shanghai, the city-state’s bargaining power is accordingly limited. The SCMP reports.

[URBAN NOTE] Eight Toronto links: neighbourhoods, housing, mass transit, Great Lakes

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  • I do agree with the argument of Emma Teitel in the Toronto Star that, between the east and the west of Toronto, the west is the more snobbish. (West-ender, here.)
  • blogTO notes that home prices in Toronto are ridiculously out of the reach of average millennials.
  • Is multi-generational housing the solution to the housing shortage in Toronto? The Toronto Star reports.
  • Toronto Life profiles</u. the photos taken by Jesse Colin Jackson of the now-demolished Regent Park building of 14 Blevins Place.
  • The story of the terrible, expensive architectural problems with the TTC’s Pioneer Village station is appalling. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Steve Munro notes how the TTC is decidedly unhappy with the failings of Presto.
  • Christian Mittelstaedt writes at NOW Toronto about how the flooding of the Toronto Islands this year can be traced, in part, to problems with how Canada and the United States jointly manage the Great Lakes.

[NEWS] Twelve LGBTQ links (#lgbtq, #queer)

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  • Daily Xtra looks at 50 years of fighting for LGBTQ rights in Canada, here.
  • Them links to a variety of classic documentaries about LGBTQ life before Stonewall, here.
  • Atlas Obscura explains why lesbians and potluck dinners are so closely associated with each other, here.
  • Them looks at the controversies surrounding the construction of monuments to LGBTQ heroes of the past, here.
  • VICE explains how venerable magazine Out was nearly ended by poor management, here.
  • Wired looks at queer history in TV movies, here.
  • Connor Garel at NOW Toronto writes, inspired by Paris Is Burning and the drag scene, about the importance of maintaining queer spaces, here.
  • Enzo DiMatteo writes at NOW Toronto about the long history of homophobia of Doug Ford, here.
  • Claire Provost writes at Open Democracy about the frighteningly well-coordinated global campaign by groups on the right against LGBTQ superheroes, here.
  • Michael Waters at Daily Xtra explains the key role of young users of social media in keeping even obscure corners of LGBTQ history alive, here.

[URBAN NOTE] Some Saturday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait considers the possibility that our model for the evolution of galaxies might be partially disproven by Big Data.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly reports how she did her latest article for the New York Times.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the beginning of a search for habitable-zone planets around Alpha Centauri A and B.
  • The Crux looks at how the skull trophies of the ancient Maya help explain civilizational collapse.
  • D-Brief notes new evidence suggesting that our humble, seemingly stable Sun can produce superflares.
  • Dead Things reports on the latest informed speculation about the sense of smell of Tyrannosaurus Rex.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares the NASA report on its progress towards the Lunar Gateway station.
  • Gizmodo looks at the growing number of China’s beautiful, deadly, blooms of bioluminescent algae.
  • io9 reports that Stjepan Sejic has a new series with DC, exploring the inner life of Harley Quinn.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at an example of a feminist musical, the Chantal Akerman The Eighties.
  • Language Hat links to a review of a dystopian novel by Yoko Tawada, The Emissary, imagining a future Japan where the learning of foreign languages is banned.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money reiterates that history, and the writing of history, is an actual profession with skills and procedures writers in the field need to know.
  • Liam Shaw writes at the LRB Blog about how people in London, late in the Second World War, coped with the terrifying attacks of V2 rockets.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a new book, Wayfinding, about the neuroscience of navigation.
  • Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution reviews a Robert Zubrin book advocating the colonization of space and finds himself unconvinced.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at the ancient comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko explored by the ESA Rosetta probe.
  • Roads and Kingdoms provides tips for visitors to the Paraguay capital of Asuncion.
  • Peter Rukavina reports that, on the day the new PEI legislature came in, 105% of Island electricity came from windpower.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel argues that, in searching for life, we should not look for exoplanets very like Earth.
  • Strange Company shares another weekend collection of diverse links.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little shares the views of Margaret Gilbert on social facts.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Kadyrov might dream of a broad Greater Chechnya, achieved at the expense of neighbouring republics.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers some superhero identity crises, of Superman and of others.

[MUSIC] Twelve music links: Beatles, Annie Lennox, Shakespears Sister, Céline Dion …

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  • There is now a play expanding on the urban legend–is it?–that the Beatles came close to being reunited in a meeting in an Eastern Townships library divided by the Canadian-American border. CTV reports.
  • The Annie Lennox-curated exhibit “Now I let You Go …” at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art sounds amazing. The New York Times reports.
  • This Guardian feature on the reunification, after two and a half decades, of Siobhan Fahey and Marcella Detroit in Shakespears Sister made me very happy.
  • Céline Dion seems to be in the middle of an interesting sort of renaissance. Why not a headlining appearance on Carpool Karaoke? VICE reports.
  • CTV News profiles the Summerside-born and Montréal-based electropop fiddler Denique, gaining praise for his innovative music and videos.
  • Noisey recently reported on an interestingly different early version of the Beyoncé song “Sorry”.
  • Dangerous Minds shares footage of a 1977 Bryan Ferry concert in Japan.
  • Vice provides readers with an introduction and overview to the best songs of Elton John.
  • Vice did readers the service of providing readers with an entry point into the discography of PJ Harvey.
  • Le Devoir looks at the phenomenon of K-Pop.
  • Josh Terry at Noisey makes the accurate point that the decision of the Chicago White Sox to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Disco Sucks riot, given the racism and homophobia of that movement, is a bad misstep.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait looks at Abell 30, a star that has been reborn in the long process of dying.
  • Centauri Dreams uses the impending launch of LightSail 2 to discuss solar sails in science fiction.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber, as part of a series of the fragility of globalization, considers if migration flows can be reversed. (He concludes it unlikely.)
  • The Crux considers if the record rain in the Midwest (Ontario, too, I would add) is a consequence of climate change.
  • D-Brief notes that the failure of people around the world to eat enough fruits and vegetables may be responsible for millions of premature dead.
  • Dangerous Minds introduces readers to gender-bending Italian music superstar Renato Zero.
  • Dead Things notes how genetic examinations have revealed the antiquity of many grapevines still used for wine.
  • Gizmodo notes that the ocean beneath the icy crust of Europa may contain simple salt.
  • io9 tries to determine the nature of the many twisted timelines of the X-Men movie universe of Fox.
  • JSTOR Daily observes that the Stonewall Riots were hardly the beginning of the gay rights movement in the US.
  • Language Log looks at the mixed scripts on a bookstore sign in Beijing.
  • Dave Brockington at Lawyers, Guns, and Money argues that Jeremy Corbyn has a very strong hold on his loyal followers, perhaps even to the point of irrationality.
  • Marginal Revolution observes that people who create public genetic profiles for themselves also undo privacy for their entire biological family.
  • Sean Marshall at Marshall’s Musings shares a photo of a very high-numbered street address, 986039 Oxford-Perth Road in Punkeydoodle’s Corners.
  • The NYR Daily examines the origins of the wealth of Lehman Brothers in the exploitation of slavery.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares a panorama-style photo of the Apollo 11 Little West Crater on the Moon.
  • Drew Rowsome notes that classic documentary Paris Is Burning has gotten a makeover and is now playing at TIFF.
  • Peter Rukavina, writing from a trip to Halifax, notes the convenience of the Eduroam procedures allowing users of one Maritime university computer network to log onto another member university’s network.
  • Dylan Reid at Spacing considers how municipal self-government might be best embedded in the constitution of Canada.
  • The Speed River Journal’s Van Waffle pays tribute to the wildflower Speedwell, a name he remembers from Watership Down.
  • Strange Maps shares a crowdsourced map depicting which areas of Europe are best (and worst) for hitchhikers.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the distribution of native speakers of Russian, with Israel emerging as more Russophone than some post-Soviet states.