A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘ceres

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Anthropology.net’s Kambiz Kamrani notes evidence that environmental change in Kenya may have driven creativity in early human populations there.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shows how astronomers use stellar occultations to investigate the thin atmosphere of Neptune’s moon Triton.
  • Centauri Dreams notes how melting ice creates landscape change on Ceres.
  • D-Brief suggests that supervolcanoes do not pose such a huge risk to the survival of humanity, in the past or the future, as we thoughts.
  • Dangerous Minds shares Paul Bowles’ recipe for a Moroccan love charm.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog investigates the transformation of shopping malls and in the era of Amazon Prime.
  • At In Medias Res, Russell Arben Fox engages with Left Behind and that book’s portrayal of rural populations in the United States which feel left behind.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how Roman Catholic nuns on the 19th century American frontier challenged gender norms.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money is critical of Tex-Mex cuisine, calling it an uncreative re-presentation of Mexican cuisine for white people in high-calorie quantities.
  • The NYR Daily shared this thought-provoking article noting how Irish America, because of falling immigration from Ireland and growing liberalism on that island, is diverging from its ancestral homeland.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews The Monument, a powerful play currently on in Toronto that engages with the missing and murdered native women.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes, in a photo-heavy post, how galaxies die (or at least, how they stop forming stars).
  • Towleroad shares a delightful interview with Adam Rippon conducted over a plate of hot wings.
  • Window on Eurasia shares an alternate history article imagining what would have become of Russia had Muscovy not conquered Novgorod.
  • Worthwhile Canadian Initiative notes the very sharp rise in public debt held by the province of Ontario, something that accelerated in recent years.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell suggests, in the era of Cambridge Analytica and fake news, that many journalists seem not to take their profession seriously enough.
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[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • ‘Nathan Smith at Apostrophen points out the profound wrongness of a same-sex romance novel that has (for starters) protagonists involved in LGBT conversion camps described sympathetically.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the exciting new detailed surface map of Titan. Among other things, that world has a sea level common to all its liquid bodies, and they have sharp shores.
  • The Crux notes a new effort to understand Antarctica underneath the ice. What happened the last time its ice melted?
  • Bruce Dorminey notes that Venus is actually really important for astronomers who are interested in extraterrestrial life.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog explains why it is important to learn about social theory if you’re a sociologist. Discourse matters.
  • Far Outliers notes the many translations of Hawaii’s “TheBus” into the Asian languages spoken there.
  • Hornet Stories notes research suggesting that product ads targeting LGBTQ markets can have good knock-on effects for these products’ general market share.
  • At In Media Res, Russell Arben Fox has started a series looking back at some of the best songs of 1978.
  • JSTOR Daily notes two education papers suggesting ways art education can improve empathy among students.
  • Language Hat notes a genetic study of populations in the Chachapoyas region of coastal Peru suggesting people there were not displaced by Incan expansion.
  • Language Log reports on a study that examines connections between a person’s lexical diversity and the progress of degenerative brain health issues.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reports on the possibility that Russian money may have been funneled through the NRA.
  • The NYR Daily reports on the intensely personal performance art of Patty Chang.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on the latest discoveries and events surrounding the Dawn probe in its permanent Ceres orbit.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes evidence that extrasolar visitor ‘Oumuamua has been deeply shaped by its encounters with cosmic particles.
  • Transit Toronto shares detailed depictions of some of the new public art installations to be housed in six stations on the Eglinton Crosstown LRT.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the growing presence of Central Asian migrants in the smaller communities of Russia. (Chinese, unsurprisingly, have not made it there.)

[NEWS] Four science links: neutrinos and Antarctica, ‘Oumuamua, Ceres and Pluto, panspermia

  • This feature explaining how neutrino telescopes in Antarctica are being used to study the Earth’s core is fascinating. The Globe and Mail has it.
  • Universe Today shares “Project Lyra”, a proposal for an unmanned probe to interstellar asteroid ‘Oumuamua.
  • Dwarf planets Ceres and Pluto, Nora Redd suggests at Discover, may have much more in common than we might think. Is Ceres a KBO transported into the warm asteroid belt?
  • Universe Today reports on one paper that takes a look at some mechanisms behind galactic panspermia.

Written by Randy McDonald

November 24, 2017 at 4:45 pm

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the effort to name, for New Horizons, Kuiper belt world (486958) 2014 MU69.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the possibility that Ceres might have a residual ocean underneath its surface.
  • D-Brief notes the bizarre supernova iPTF14hls, which seems to have been a recurrent supernova for the past sixty years.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas argues we are already in a dystopia, one of Huxley not of Orwell.
  • Hornet Stories notes that Ezra Miller was advised not to come out by his supposed allies in Hollywood.
  • The LRB Blog notes an interesting exhibit, inspired by poetry and the Stalinist camp system, in London’s Bloomsbury Square.
  • At Out of Ambit, Diane Duane tells the old Swiss story of Charlemagne and the snake.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on the last days of bullfighting in Tijuana.
  • Mark Simpson considers the state of masculinity in the modern United Kingdom, and calls for some tartiness.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers how the Bullet Cluster of galaxies helps prove the existence of dark matter.
  • Understanding Society considers political power in China at the level of the village.
  • Window on Eurasia considers a variety of negative demographic trends for ethnic Russians in Russia, including low fertility and emigration.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Centauri Dreams notes the remarkably complex system of Proxima Centauri, with multiple belts and more possible planets, as does D-Brief.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of a new sort of fusion reactions, involving not atoms but quarks.
  • Hornet Stories notes a new acoustic cover of the Kinky Boots song “Not My Father’s Son.”
  • Language Hat takes a brief look at Cyrillic, since the Soviet era written in Cyrillic script.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how the Trump Administration is unconcerned by the latest report regarding catastrophic climate change.
  • The LRB Blog notes how Armenia and Armenians remember past genocides and current refugee flows.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes the further extension of the Dawn mission at Ceres.
  • Drew Rowsome shares some of Stephen King’s tips for aspiring writers.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how some long-exposure Hubble photographs of galaxies picked up nearby asteroids.
  • John Scalzi shares his cover of “Rocket Man”.
  • Window on Eurasia wonders if ISIS is spreading into Russia via migrant workers from Central Asia.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the import of comet A/2017U1, a potential visitor from another planetary system, while Centauri Dreams also takes a look.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly celebrates Montréal’s Atwater Market, with photos.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes one report that Ceres’ primordial ocean may have mixed with its surface, to make a world covered in salty mud.
  • The Map Room Blog links to an interactive French-language map looking at census data on different neighbourhoods in different cities.
  • The New APPS Blog looks at the changing role of the judiciary as enforcing of order in a privatized world.
  • The NYR Daily wonders if North Korea’s government has firm control over its nuclear weapons, given American issues.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes the expansion of Google Maps to other worlds in our solar system.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer examines the situation facing Catalonia, and Spain, after the UDI.
  • Roads and Kingdoms takes a photographic look at Little Mogadishu, a Somali neighbourhood in Kampala, Uganda.
  • Rocky Planet notes the ongoing risk of a major volcanic eruption at Tinakula, in the Solomon Islands.
  • Understanding Society takes a look at the role and functioning of overlapping social identities.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait reports on the naming of the features of the surface of Ceres.
  • D-Brief notes that small-scale robotic manufacturing is now a thing.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze reports on a new study of exoplanets and their stars.
  • The Dragon’s Tales has a nice round-up of news on hominin research and primates generally.
  • Hornet Stories notes that there is apparently a debate about women as drag queens. I don’t see why they should not, frankly.
  • Joe. My. God links to a Rolling Stone article celebrating Erotica and Sex, by Madonna, on their 25th anniversary.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the way Dollar General caters to a permanent underclass. Like Dollarama in Canada?
  • Language Hat notes that Xibe, related to Manchu, is receiving protection from China.
  • The NYR Daily reports on the mass killings, approaching genocide, in Indonesia in 1965.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel reports on the proofs we have for the current age of the universe.