A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘chechnya

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares images of galaxy M61.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at a proposal for the Solar Cruiser probe, a NASA probe that would use a solar sail.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of bacteria on coasts which manufacture dimethyl sulfide.
  • Bruce Dorminey writes about some facts about the NASA X-15 rocket plane.
  • The Dragon’s Tales reports on the strange nuclear accident in Nyonoksa, Russia.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on the recent uncovering of the ancient Egyptian city of Heracleion, under the Mediterranean.
  • Language Hat looks at 19th century standards on ancient Greek language.
  • Language Log notes an ironically swapped newspaper article subhead.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the role of Tom Cotton in the recent Greenland scandal.
  • Marginal Revolution glances at the relationship between China and Singapore.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how the car ride played a role in the writing of Jacques Lacan.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares an index on state fragility around the world.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why Jupiter suffers so many impacts from incoming bodies.
  • John Scalzi at Whatever reports on what seems to have been an enjoyable concert experience with Iron Maiden.
  • Window on Eurasia reports a claim that, with regards to a border dispute, Chechnya is much more unified than Dagestan.

[URBAN NOTE] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait considers the possibility that our model for the evolution of galaxies might be partially disproven by Big Data.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly reports how she did her latest article for the New York Times.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the beginning of a search for habitable-zone planets around Alpha Centauri A and B.
  • The Crux looks at how the skull trophies of the ancient Maya help explain civilizational collapse.
  • D-Brief notes new evidence suggesting that our humble, seemingly stable Sun can produce superflares.
  • Dead Things reports on the latest informed speculation about the sense of smell of Tyrannosaurus Rex.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares the NASA report on its progress towards the Lunar Gateway station.
  • Gizmodo looks at the growing number of China’s beautiful, deadly, blooms of bioluminescent algae.
  • io9 reports that Stjepan Sejic has a new series with DC, exploring the inner life of Harley Quinn.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at an example of a feminist musical, the Chantal Akerman The Eighties.
  • Language Hat links to a review of a dystopian novel by Yoko Tawada, The Emissary, imagining a future Japan where the learning of foreign languages is banned.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money reiterates that history, and the writing of history, is an actual profession with skills and procedures writers in the field need to know.
  • Liam Shaw writes at the LRB Blog about how people in London, late in the Second World War, coped with the terrifying attacks of V2 rockets.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a new book, Wayfinding, about the neuroscience of navigation.
  • Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution reviews a Robert Zubrin book advocating the colonization of space and finds himself unconvinced.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at the ancient comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko explored by the ESA Rosetta probe.
  • Roads and Kingdoms provides tips for visitors to the Paraguay capital of Asuncion.
  • Peter Rukavina reports that, on the day the new PEI legislature came in, 105% of Island electricity came from windpower.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel argues that, in searching for life, we should not look for exoplanets very like Earth.
  • Strange Company shares another weekend collection of diverse links.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little shares the views of Margaret Gilbert on social facts.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Kadyrov might dream of a broad Greater Chechnya, achieved at the expense of neighbouring republics.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers some superhero identity crises, of Superman and of others.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait shares Johannes Kroeger’s image of the median Earth.
  • The Crux considers when human societies began to accumulate large numbers of aged people. Would there have been octogenarians in any Stone Age cultures, for instance?
  • The Dragon’s Tales considers Russia’s strategy in Southeast Asia.
  • Alexandra Samuel at JSTOR Daily notes that one way to fight against fake news is for people to broaden their friends networks beyond their ideological sympathizers.
  • Language Log, noting a television clip from Algeria in which a person defend their native dialect versus standard Arabic, compares the language situation in the Arab world to that of China.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen explains how the Tervuren Central African museum in Brussels has not been decolonized.
  • The Planetary Society Blog explores the ice giants, Uranus and Neptune.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why, in current physics, the multiverse must exist.
  • Strange Company explores the strange disappearance, in the Arizona desert in 1952, of a young couple. Their plane was found and in perfect condition, but what happened to them?
  • Strange Maps reports on the tragic migration of six Californian raptors, only one of which managed to make it to its destination.
  • Towleroad reports on the appearance of actor and singer Ben Platt on The Ellen Show, talking about his career and coming out.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the apparently widespread mutual dislike of Chechens and Muscovites.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers the French Impressionist artists Pierre Puvis de Chavannes and Suzanne Valadon, with images of their art.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the remarkable amount of information produced by a study of globular clusters in the Coma cluster of galaxies.
  • Crooked Timber notes the decision of British prosecutors to charge the Stansted 15, people who prevented a flight from taking off with reject asylum claimants, with terrorism-related offenses.
  • The Crux notes some of the remarkable evolutionary tricks that let different insects develop ears and the sense of hearing.
  • D-Brief notes that the Voyager 2 probe has exited the heliosphere, arguably leaving the solar system.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing notes how digital media accentuate the modern world’s fragmentation and exhaustion of time.
  • Information is Beautiful shares the results of this year’s Information is Beauty awards, sharing all sorts of impressive data visualization products including the winner.
  • JSTOR Daily notes some lessons about monks’ organization of time; productivity improvements, with better technology, were used not to increase production but rather to free up time for other uses.
  • Language Hat links to a BBC article noting the potential that machine translation offers for the understanding of Sumerian cuneiform tablets, most of which are untranslated.
  • Rose Jacobs at Lingua Franca announces that, after years of operation, this blog will be closed before the end of the month.
  • The Planetary Society Blog’s Jason Davis announces that the OSIRIS-REx probe has detected water on asteroid 101955 Bennu.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw notes the death of his Canadian relative, the anthropologist Cyril Belshaw.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why we have not yet found Earth analog planets.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the leadership of Chechnya has been criticizing neighbouring Dagestan for its treatment of Chechens there.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • In a guest post at Antipope, researcher and novelist Heather Child writes about the extent to which Big Data has moved from science fiction to reality.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the very recent discovery of a massive crater buried under the ice of Greenland, one that may have impacted in the human era and altered world climate. Are there others like it?
  • Crooked Timber responds to the Brexit proposal being presented to the British parliament. Is this it?
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of the unusually large and dim, potentially unexplainable, dwarf galaxy Antlia 2 near the Milky Way Galaxy.
  • Gizmodo notes that the size of mysterious ‘Oumuamua was overestimated.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the life and achievements of Polish-born scholar Jósef Czapski, a man who miraculously survived the Soviet massacre of Polish officers at Katyn.
  • At the LRB Blog, Ken Kalfus writes about his father’s experience owning a drycleaner in a 1960s complex run by the Trump family.
  • Marginal Revolution starts a discussion over a recent article in The Atlantic claiming that there has been a sharp drop-off in the sex enjoyed by younger people in the United States (and elsewhere?).
  • At Roads and Kingdoms, T.M. Brown shares a story of the crazy last night of his bartending days in Manhattan’s Alphabet City.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel imagines what the universe would have been like during its youth, during peak star formation.
  • Strange Maps’ Frank Jacobs takes a look at different partition plans for the United States, aiming to split the country into liberal and conservative successor states.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that some Ingush, after noting the loss of some border territories to neighbouring Chechnya, fear they might get swallowed up by their larger, culturally related, neighbours.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alexander Harrowell predicts that there will not be enough Tory MPs in the United Kingdom willing to topple Theresa May over the Brexit deal.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Centauri Dreams takes a look at how new technology makes access to deep-sky astronomical images easier than ever, allowing for the recovery of more data.
  • The Crux considers the factors that make humans so inclined to believe in the existence of god and the supernatural, including our pattern-recognition skills.
  • D-Brief shares the latest research into the origins of the atmospheric haze of Titan.
  • Todd Schoepflin at the Everyday Sociology Blog has an intriguing post performing ethnography on the fans of the Buffalo Bills.
  • At A Fistful of Euros, Alexander Harrowell notes one thing to take from the elections in Bavaria is the remarkable strength of the Greens, nearing the CDU/CSU nationally.
  • io9 shares the delightful Alien-themed maternity photos of a British Columbia couple.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at contesting visions of motherhood among American feminists in the 1960s and 1970s.
  • Language Hat reports on “The Midnight Court”, a poem written in the 19th century in a now-extinct dialect of Irish.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes one astounding possible defense of Saudi Arabia faced with Jamal Khashoggi, that his death was accidental.
  • Christine Gordon Manley shares with her readers her words and her photos of Newfoundland’s dramatic Signal Hill.
  • The NYR Daily shares the witness of Käthe Kollwitz to the end of the First World War and the German Empire in 1918-1919.
  • Casey Dreier at the Planetary Society Blog criticizes First Man for not showing the excitement of Armstrong and the other Apollo astronauts.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on one woman’s search for the Korean cornbread remembered by her mother as a Korean War refugee.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel shares images of some of the most distant objects in the universe images by us so far.
  • Strange Company expands upon the interesting life of early modern English travel writer Thomas Coryat, who indeed does deserve more attention.
  • Window on Eurasia wonders where protests in Ingushetia regarding border changes with Chechnya are going.
  • Arnold Zwicky explores the fable of the forest that identified too closely with the wooden handle of an ax.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait takes a look at the question of how far, exactly, the Pleiades star cluster is from Earth. It turns out this question breaks down into a lot of interesting secondary issues.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly starts an interesting discussion around the observation that so many people are uncomfortable with the details of their body.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on the exciting evidence of cryovolcanism at Ceres.
  • The Crux reports on new suggestions that, although Neanderthals had bigger brains than Homo sapiens, Neanderthal brains were not thereby better brains.
  • D-Brief notes evidence that the ability of bats and dolphins to echolocate may ultimate derive from a shared gene governing their muscles.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes that astronomers have used data on the trajectory of ‘Oumuamua to suggest it may have come from one of four stars.
  • Far Outliers explores the Appalachian timber boom of the 1870s that created the economic preconditions for the famed feud between the Hatfields and the McCoys.
  • Language Hat notes the unique whistling language prevailing among the Khasi people living in some isolated villages in the Indian state of Meghalaya.
  • Lingua Franca, at the Chronicles, notes that the fastest-growing language in the United States is the Indian language of Telugu.
  • Jeremy Harding at the LRB Blog writes about the import of the recognition, by Macron, of the French state’s involvement in the murder of pro-Algerian independence activist Maurice Audin in 1958.
  • Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution praises the diaries of Mihail Sebastian, a Romanian Jewish intellectual alive during the Second World War
  • The New APPS Blog takes a look at the concept of the carnival from Bakhtin.
  • Gabrielle Bellot at NYR Daily considers the life of Elizabeth Bishop and Bishop’s relationship to loneliness.
  • Jason Davis at the Planetary Society Blog describes how CubeSats were paired with solar sails to create a Mars probe, Mars Cube One.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer considers some possible responses from the left to a conservative Supreme Court in the US.
  • Roads and Kingdoms takes a look at the challenges facing the street food of Xi’an.
  • Rocky Planet examines why, for decades, geologists mistakenly believed that the California ground was bulging pre-earthquake in Palmdale.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel examines how some objects called stars, like neutron stars and white dwarfs and brown dwarfs, actually are not stars.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps notes how China and Europe stand out as being particularly irreligious on a world map of atheism.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the instability that might be created in the North Caucasus by a border change between Chechnya and Ingushetia.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares some beautiful pictures of flowers from a garden in Palo Alto.