A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘chicago

[PHOTO] Chicago on my screen in Toronto

Chicago on my screen #toronto #chicago #satelliteimage #googleearth #googlehome #television

Written by Randy McDonald

May 5, 2020 at 4:00 pm

[URBAN NOTE] Five city notes: Montréal, Bronx, Nashville, Chicago, London

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Kingston, Montréal, Chicago, New Orleans, Buenos Aires

  • Plans for a residential development in Kingston’s west-end Graceland district have raised environmental concerns. Global News reports.
  • HuffPostQuebec shares the exciting plans for expanding and modernizing the complex around the Oratoire Saint-Joseph.
  • CityLab notes how, despite having a declining black population, Chicago is set to elect a black mayor.
  • VICE looks at the bars and nightclubs in uptown New Orleans that, in the 1970s, hosted the city’s jazz and funk scenes.
  • Guardian Cities reports on the murga, the latest dance/pop culture craze in Buenos Aires.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Ottawa, Kingston, Halifax, Chicago, Greater Bay Area and Hong Kong

  • CBC reports on how Ottawa is storing its ever-growing mountain of snow removed from its streets.
  • The city of Kingston, Ontario, is facing a growing shortage of family doctors despite it being a regional hub. Global News reports.
  • The centenary of anti-Chinese riots in Halifax has just passed. (Would you believe I never learned of these at school?) Global News reports.
  • VICE tells the story of how most people can, or cannot, afford to live in an ever-pricier city of Chicago.
  • The SCMP reports on the “Greater Bay Area” plan just announced by China, an integration of the Pearl River area into a single global powerhouse. How will Hong Kong fit into this?

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Oshawa, Chicago, Montréal, London, Bulawayo

  • Rosie Di Manno writes at the Toronto Star about the import of the concert that Sting threw in Oshawa for newly unemployed GM workers there.
  • Chicago is going to house some innovative new public housing designs, combining low-cost homes for access to physically attached libraries and their educational opportunities. WTTW reports.
  • CBC takes a look at the desperate last gap of the Montreal Star, forty years ago.
  • CBC reports on the mass excavation of tens of thousands of bodies, and their study by experts, conducted as part of a program of commuter rail construction at a site in London.
  • Ozy looks at the decline of Bulawayo, the second city of Zimbabwe.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Raccoon City, Hamilton, Chicago, Milwaukee, Paris

  • Mark Clapham at CityMetric takes</u. an insightful look at the terrifying, dehumanizing, ways in which the fictional Raccoon City was designed.
  • Alex Bozikovic writes in The Globe and Mail about the goals of the new chief planner of Hamilton, Jason Thorne, to help grow a dynamic and livable city.
  • Guardian Cities looks at how many of the major streets of Chicago trace their ancestry to the trails of indigenous peoples.
  • WUWM notes how Milwaukee has the largest concentration of Rohingya refugees in the United States.
  • Mira Kamdar at the NYR Daily looks at the agricultural past–and potential future–of the Paris periphery, particularly but not only Seine-Saint-Denis.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Montréal, Chicago, London, Trieste, Bangkok

  • La Presse notes that Montréal mayor Valérie Laplante faces significant challenges in dealing with the new Québec government.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on a recent study tracing back large-scale police violence in Chicago back to the late 19th century.
  • Feargus O’Sullivan at CityLab notes how, among other things, exceptionally high rents lead to much commercial space in London being vacant. Are there ways to deal with this?
  • This Asia Times article takes a look at Chinese investments in the port of Trieste that might make this port a leading portal for Chinese trade, surpassing Greece’s Piraeus.
  • Jamie Fullerton at Guardian Cities considers if increasing the amount of green space in low-lying Bangkok might help protect that city against sea level rise.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Winnipeg, Buffalo, Chicago, Tallinn, Duqm

  • The question of re-opening the storied intersection of Portage and Main, at the heart of Winnipeg, to pedestrian traffic is being hotly debated. The National Post reports.
  • CityLab describes how the New York city of Buffalo is enjoying a huge boom in the creation of public art.
  • Wired describes Chicago’s Wild Mile, a new riverine habitat ingeniously created for the manmade North Branch Canal.
  • The World Economic Forum reports that, on the theory that public transit is a public good, Estonia is making public transit free throughout the country, including in the capital of Tallinn.
  • Guardian Cities notes the energetic effort of Oman to create, where five years ago there was just desert, the new city of Duqm.

[URBAN NOTE] Five cities links: Peel Region, Montréal, Ontario Cannabis Store, Homewood, London

  • Chris Rattan argues at NOW Toronto that Peel Region should stop its school resource officer program, embedding cops in schools.
  • Montréal mayor Valérie Plante wants to make homebuying more affordable for locals in her city. The Montreal Gazette reports.
  • The first four outposts of the Ontario Cannabis Store chain will be in Toronto, Kingston, Guelph, and Thunder Bay. The Toronto Star reports.
  • CityLab reports on how the Chicagoland community of Homewood is using comics to market itself to millennial homeseekers, here.
  • Why is the homicide rate in London so high? Problems in crime-fighting, including policing and crime prevention both, need to be dealt with. Bloomberg View reports.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Larisa Kurtović writes at anthro{dendum} about her experiences, as an anthropologist studying Bosnia and a native Sarajevan, at the time of the trial of Ratko Mladić. Representation in this circumstance was fraught.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the remarkable claim that extragalactic planets have been discovered 3.5 billion light-years away through gravitational lensing and does not find it intrinsically implausible. Centauri Dreams also looks at the background behind the claimed detection of two thousand rogue planets, ranging in mass from the Moon to Jupiter, in a distant galaxy.
  • Dangerous Minds reviews a fantastic-sounding book reviewing girl gangs and bikers in the pulp fiction of mid-20th century English-language literature.
  • Hornet Stories links to the Mattachine Podcast, a new podcast looking at pre-Stonwall LGBTQ history including that relating to the pioneering Mattachine Society.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the substantial evidence that fish can actually be quite smart, certainly smarter than popular stereotypes have them being.
  • Language Hat reports on the existence of a thriving population of speakers of Aramaic now in existence in New Jersey.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the many ways in which the privatization of state businesses have gone astray in the United Kingdom, and suggests that there is conflict between short-term capitalist desires and long-term needs. Renationalization a solution?
  • At Marginal Revolution, Tyler Cowen argues that the prospect of the future financial insolvency of Chicago helps limit the large-scale settlement of wealthy people there, keeping the metropolis relatively affordable.
  • Stephen Baker of The Numerati reflected, on the eve of the Superbowl, on the origins of his fandom with the Philadelphia Eagles in 1963 just before the assassination of JFK.
  • The NYR Daily shares a rational proposal for an Israeli-Palestinian confederation that, alas, will never fly given irrational reality.
  • Seriously Science notes a paper suggesting that Norway rats do, in fact, the reciprocal trade of goods and services.
  • Strange Company notes an unfortunate picnic in Indiana in 1931, where the Simmons family was unexpectedly poisoned by strychnine capsules? Who did it?
  • Window on Eurasia notes a demographers’ observation that, given the age structure and fertility of the Russian population, even with plausible numbers of immigrants the country’s population may never again grow.