A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘china

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Beyond the Beyond shares Voltaire’s critique of early globalization.
  • blogTO reports on how TTC streetcars are failing earlier than expected.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about her trip to Philadelphia to see art.
  • Centauri Dreams talks about discovering streams of stars connecting the Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal galaxy to the Milky Way.
  • Crooked Timber talks about Donald Trump as a president with or without precedents.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze talks about the fate of exomoons in white dwarf systems.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog takes a sociological perspective on fake news.
  • Language Log mourns the death of pinyin inventor Zhou Youguang.
  • The LRB Blog talks about the pleasures of incomprehension.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money talks about Vietnam as a maritime power.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that seasteading is set to have a go in French Polynesia.
  • Window on Eurasia argues Russia is too weak to keep a post-Soviet sphere of influence, and suggests Russia is set to be dominated by China and so needs a Western alliance.

[LINK] “China Plans To Land Probes on Far Side of Moon, Mars by 2020”

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This news comes from the end of 2016, but it’s still quite important. May China continue to progress in space travel, for the benefit of us all.

China vowed Tuesday to speed up the development of its space industry as it set out its plans to become the first country to soft land a probe on the far side of the moon, around 2018, and launch its first Mars probe by 2020.

“To explore the vast cosmos, develop the space industry and build China into a space power is a dream we pursue unremittingly,” read a white paper setting out the country’s space strategy for the next five years. It says China aims to use space for peaceful purposes and to guarantee national security, and to carry out cutting edge scientific research.

The white paper released by the information office of China’s Cabinet points to the growing ambitions of China’s already rapidly advancing space program. Although the white paper doesn’t mention it, China’s eventual goal is the symbolic feat of landing an astronaut on the moon.

While Russia and the United States have more experience in manned space travel, China’s military-backed program has made steady progress in a comparatively short time.

Since China conducted its first crewed space mission in 2003, it has staged a spacewalk and landed a rover on the moon in 2013 — the first time humans had soft landed anything on the moon since the 1970s.

Written by Randy McDonald

January 11, 2017 at 5:15 pm

Posted in Politics, Science

Tagged with , , , ,

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait shares a video showing how tacos are made in space.
  • blogTO shares some classic photos of the TTC in the 1960s and 1970s.
  • The Crux goes into more detail about the mesentery.
  • D-Brief notes how the binary star KIC 9832227 is projected to experience a stellar merger in 2022.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to one paper suggesting that exoplanets and brown dwarfs are as common around A and F stars as around dimmer Sun-like stars, and links to another paper examining the potential of detecting transits of exoplanets orbiting brown dwarfs.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to an article wondering if China’s seizure of a US navy drone could set a precedent for satellite seizures.
  • Language Log links to Yiyun Lee’s article about abandoning Chinese for English.
  • The LRB Blog remembers philosopher Derek Parfit.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks at the recent riots in Mexico, caused by rising gas prices.
  • Strange Maps shares informative maps exploring the Netherlands’ internal distinctions.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at how the Russian language has multiple standards despite Russian official claims, and shares complaints about Kaliningrad’s vulnerability.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • blogTO notes that TTC tunnels will get WiFi in 2018.
  • Border Thinking’s Laura Augustín shares some of Edvard Munch’s brothel paintings.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the latest science on fast radio bursts.
  • Dangerous Minds shares some of the sexy covers of Yugoslavian computer magazine Računari.
  • Dead Things looks at the latest research into dinosaur eggs.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper suggesting that a high surface magnetic field in a red giant star indicates a recent swallowing of a planet.
  • Language Log shares an ad for a portable smog mask from China.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money takes issue with the idea of NAFTA being of general benefit to Mexico.
  • Torontoist looks at the history of Toronto General Hospital.
  • Window on Eurasia is skeptical about an American proposal for Ukraine, and suggests Ossetian reunification within Russia is the next annexation likely to be made by Russia.

[LINK] “China to Shut Down Its Ivory Trade by the End of 2017”

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National Geographic‘s Jani Actman reports on new hope from China re: the world trade in elephant ivory.

China will shut down its domestic ivory trade by the end of 2017, according to an announcement made today by the Chinese government.

The announcement comes more than a year after China’s President Xi Jinping and United States President Barack Obama pledged to enact “nearly complete bans” on the import and export of ivory, an agreement Wildlife Watch reporter Rachael Bale described as “the most significant step yet in efforts to shut down an industry that has fueled the illegal hunting of elephants.”

It also follows a commitment made in October by the international community to close domestic ivory markets.

“This is the best New Year’s present I’ve ever had,” says Sue Lieberman, vice president of international policy for the Wildlife Conservation Society, a nonprofit based in New York City that works to help save elephants and other wildlife. “China is the world’s largest market, both of small ivory items and high-end, expensive ones.”

The global ivory trade has been banned since 1989, but during recent years large-scale poaching has resumed, and elephant numbers have fallen as low as 415,000. Advocates believe that legal domestic ivory markets perpetuate an illegal trade because older, pre-ban ivory can’t easily be distinguished from poached ivory.

Written by Randy McDonald

January 2, 2017 at 9:30 pm

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Anthropology.net describes an effort to digitize tapes recording Navajo oral history.
  • Centauri Dreams remembers Vera Rubin.
  • D-Brief looks</a at a South Korean mecha.
  • Dangerous Minds shares a 1984 TV clip featuring George Michael and Morrissey talking about Joy Division.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper suggesting a gas giant exoplanet might be indicated by a protoplanetary disk.
  • Language Log reports on how Chinese netizens are criticizing pollution through the mockery of official slogans.
  • Language Hat looks at the question of how the word “pecan” is pronounced.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money argues political science is not a science at all, like economics.
  • The NYRB Daily notes that the shared inability of Trump and Putin to plan things and account for unexpected consequences does not lend itself to optimism.
  • Window on Euruasia looks at Tatarstan’s issues with regional transfer funding in Russia and shares an apocalyptic account of what will happen to Ukraine in the Russian sphere of influence.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about the need for opponents of Trump to fight, not just the man but the root causes.
  • Centauri Dreams notes a study suggesting Proxima Centauri is gravitationally bound to Alpha Centauri A and B.
  • Dangerous Minds shares photos depicting the devastation of Gatlinburg by fire.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes that stars with close-orbiting rocky worlds seem to have above-solar metallicity, and considers the albedos of exoplanets.
  • Far Outliers looks at how Poland’s Communist government tried to undermine Pope John Paul II in 1979.
  • Joe. My. God. notes a lawsuit lodged against the American government demanding the release of information regarding the Russian information hack.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes poor working conditions in Bangladesh.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a Yoruba tongue twister.
  • The Planetary Society Blog links to China’s planned program of space exploration.