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Posts Tagged ‘china

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Architectuul notes a bike tour of Bauhaus architecture in Berlin.
  • Bad Astronomy Phil Plait notes the discovery of Beta Pictoris c, a second super-Jovian planet in that young system.
  • Centauri Dreams notes that the NASA Europa Clipper is moving ahead.
  • Crooked Timber shares a gorgeous night photo of San Giorgio Maggiore, in Venice.
  • The Crux notes what we are learning about the Denisovans.
  • D-Brief notes that Neanderthals were prone to swimmer’s ear.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at some of the pop culture likes of Karl Marx.
  • Drew Ex Machina’s Andrew LePage looks at the exoplanets of GJ 1061.
  • Earther notes how Icelanders mourned the loss of a glacier in a ceremony.
  • Whitney Kimball at Gizmodo looks at what the mass data loss of more than a decade’s worth of music at Myspace means for our Internet era.
  • Imageo shares photos of spiraling cloud formations photographed at night from space.
  • Ian Humberstone at The Island Review writes about his witnessing of the bonxies, birds of the Shetlands.
  • Joe. My. God. notes a report suggesting Trump joked about swapping Greenland for Puerto Rico.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how the rhythmic dancing of the Shakers in 18th century America marked that sect as different.
  • Language Hat considers the humour of some philosophers.
  • Language Log notes the oblique commentaries of Hong Kong tycoon Li Ka-shing on his city-state’s protests.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the idiocy of the Trump fetish for Greenland.
  • The Map Room Blog notes how astronomers have mapped the Local Void, of deep intergalactic space.
  • Marginal Revolution wonders if the future of Venice might be found in its becoming a Chinese portal into Europe.
  • Sean Marshall notes how the Ford government is undermining conservation in Ontario.
  • The NYR Daily shares some of the New York City photography of Phil Penman.
  • Starts With A Bang’s notes the immense storms of Saturn.
  • Strange Company shares a weekend collection of links.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at how Belarus plans on reorganizing its internal structures to try to minimize rural depopulation.
  • Nick Rowe at Worthwhile Canadian Initiative talks about monetary policy in metaphors.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at some penguins from around the world.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Saira Mehmood blogs at {anthro}dendum about her experiences as an ethnographer in her New Orleans community.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait blogs about Supernova 2016iet, a rare example of a pair-instability supernova.
  • At the Broadside Blog, Caitlin Kelly writes about the need of people to avoid isolation.
  • Centauri Dreams notes that future astronomers might be able to detect the fluorescence of life on exoplanets during flares.
  • Why, Crooked Timber asks, shouldn’t children be given the vote?
  • D-Brief notes scientists have manufactured a ring of carbon atoms.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the complexities of #VanLife in the United States, at once a lifestyle choice in the US and a response to poverty.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money is decidedly unimpressed by the recent rewriting of the Statue of Liberty.
  • Neuroskeptic looks at how neuroimaging studies study surprisingly few left-handers, and how this is a problem.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how Big Data in China is enhancing state power, concentrating on the situation in Xinjiang.
  • Drew Rowsome looks at a new documentary on the genesis of Fiddler on the Roof, Fiddler: Miracle of Miracles.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at how dark matter and black holes can interact.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at coded anti-black racism in the 1937 United States.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Architectuul takes a look at different retrofuture imaginings from the 20th century of what architecture might look like in the 21st century.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the mysteries surrounding a sudden recent eruption of Sagittarius A*.
  • Centauri Dreams considers what the James Webb Space Telescope might be able to pick up from TRAPPIST-1.
  • Henry Farrell at Crooked Timber considers Ossian’s Ride, a SF novel by Fred Hoyle imagining a progressive Ireland leapfrogging ahead of Britain, and how this scenario is being realized now.
  • D-Brief looks at what a glitch in the spin rate of the Vela pulsar reveals about these bodies.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at how Rock Hudson came to star in the SF film Seconds.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes a new NASA Kepler study suggesting (very) broadly Earth-like worlds might orbit as many as one in six Sun-like stars.
  • Gizmodo links</u. to a study suggesting the oddly fuzzy core of Jupiter might be a consequences of an ancient collision with a massive protoplanet.
  • Imageo notes that July broke all sorts of climate records.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that the Trump administration has exempted Bibles from the new China tariffs.
  • Language Hat considers, after the space of a decade, why people might say a language is so foreign as to be Greek.
  • Robert Farley links at Lawyers, Guns and Money to an analysis of what major battle fleets around the world would have looked like in 1950 absent a Second World War.
  • The LRB Blog notes how the UK Conservative government’s turn towards repressive law-and-order measures will please Faragists.
  • The Map Room Blog shares maps indicating the scale of the American opioid crisis.
  • Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution links to one of his columns noting how two decades of nil economic growth has harmed Italy.
  • Peter Watts at his blog has a critical take on the Chinese SF movie The Wandering Earth.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how things are becoming quite bad for Kashmiris.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at how the OSIRIS-REx team is looking for sample sites on asteroid Bennu.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the evidence from our solar system’s moons that two planets can indeed stably share the same orbit.
  • Towleroad notes how a successful campaign has helped London fetish bar Backstreet survive gentrification.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares some gorgeous blue and black flowers in the Gamble Garden of Palo Alto, and meditations on said.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait looks at the strange galaxy NGC 5866.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly looks at some of her prep work when she covers a news story.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the idea of using the Earth itself for gravitational lensing.
  • D-Brief notes a newly-discovered fossil parrot from New Zealand, a bird nearly one metre in size.
  • Far Outliers looks at the values of cowrie shells in 19th century central Africa. What could they buy?
  • Gizmodo notes the limited circumstances in which IMDb will allow transgender people to remove their birth names from their records.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the abortive American state of Franklin.
  • Language Hat notes a 19th century Russian exile’s experience with the differences between Norwegian and Swedish.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes, after Epstein, the incompetence that too often characterizes American prisons.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the importance of slavery in the history of Venice.
  • The NYR Daily notes how W.H. Auden was decidedly unimpressed by the Apollo moon landing, and why.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the import of astronomers’ discovery of an ancient early black hole.
  • Strange Maps’ Frank Jacobs shares a vertical world map from China.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little considers how competent the Nuclear Regulatory Commission actually is.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the internal divides of Russia.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Shir Lerman Ginzburg at anthro{dendum} writes about kintsugi in her own life.
  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait looks at the massive black hole, massing two billion suns, measured in the heart of NGC 3258.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly shares some photos from her Hudson River life.
  • D-Brief notes how astronomers may be able to detect the radio signals emitted from the cores of planets orbiting dead stars.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog looks at the sociology of religion.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how Ferdinand Magellan acted in many ways like a pirate.
  • Language Hat reports on the remarkable differences between the two dubbed French versions of The Simpsons, one in France and one in Québec.
  • Language Log reports on the Chinese placename “Xinjiang Uygur.”
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money makes the point that Joe Biden is too old, too set in his ways, to be president.
  • Molly Crabapple writes at the NYR Daily about the nature and goals of the massive protest movement in Puerto Rico.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks even-handedly at the controversy surrounding the idea of building the Thirty Metre Telescope on top of sacred Mauna Kea.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at controversy in Russia over the representation of different Tatar populations on the Russian 2020 census.
  • Stephen Gordon at Worthwhile Canadian Initiative wonders why it was 1953 that, in Canada, saw the growth in women on the job market.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait looks at Westerlund-1, a massive star cluster with many bright stars in our galaxy.
  • Centauri Dreams notes a finding that giant planets like Jupiter are less likely to be found around Sun-like stars.
  • D-Brief notes how, in a time of climate change, birds migrated between Canada and the equator.
  • Bruce Dorminey lists five overlooked facts about the Apollo 11 mission.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that the US House of Representatives has approved the creation of a US Space Corps analogous to the Marines.
  • JSTOR Daily considers tactics to cure groupthink.
  • Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution, looking at the experience of Hong Kong, observes how closely economic freedoms depend on political freedom and legitimacy.
  • Casey Dreier at the Planetary Society Blog explains his rationale for calculating that the Apollo project, in 2019 dollars, cost more than $US 700 billion.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the star R136a1, a star in the 30 Doradus cluster in the Large Magellanic Cloud that is the most massive star known to exist.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Circassians in Syria find it very difficult to seek refuge in their ancestral lands in the North Caucasus.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks, in occasionally NSFW detail, at the importance of June the 16th for him as a date.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Hamilton, Québec City, San Jose, Tehran, Hong Kong

  • Real estate in Hamilton, Ontario, is quite affordable by GTA standards. Global News reports.
  • Québec City has a new farmer’s market to replace an old. CBC reports.
  • San Jose, California, is set to embark on a grand experiment in cohousing, CityLab reports.
  • These vast abandoned apartment blocks in the desert outside of Tehran speak of economic underperformance, to say the least. Messynessychic has it.
  • Now that Hong Kong has not just competition from other cities in China but is finding itself outmatched by the likes of Shenzhen and Shanghai, the city-state’s bargaining power is accordingly limited. The SCMP reports.