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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘china

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Centauri Dreams continues the debate over whether KIC 8462582 has been dimming.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the collection, organized by the Romanian Orthodox Church, of three million signatures against same-sex marriage.
  • The LRB Blog considers racism in old works of fiction.
  • The NYRB writes on the handles of Wittgenstein.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog notes a migration of Chinese prostitutes to Africa.
  • Towleroad notes the defense by an Arkansas television station of a gay reporter who works there.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy reports on a poll suggesting Native Americans do not care much about the name of the Washington Redskins.
  • Window on Eurasia warns that Mongolia’s dams of rivers feeding into Lake Baikal might kill the lake, and notes the Russian economic crisis is making the military more attractive to job-seekers.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares photos of three native flowering plants of California.

[NEWS] Some Tuesday links

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  • The Atlantic notes the import of the assassination of the head of the Taliban.
  • The BBC observes Spotify has more revenues, but is still not making money.
  • Bloomberg suggests Brexit would embolden central European populists and slow down growth, and looks at Coca Cola’s end of production in Venezuela.
  • Bloomberg View suggests a new class of educated Chinese professionals will hurt middle-class wages.
  • The CBC notes the lifting of the mandatory evacuation order for northern Alberta oil sands camps.
  • Daily Xtra looks at the importance of Facebook in spreading knowledge to PrEP.
  • Gizmodo notes the proliferation of cephalopods in the world’s oceans.
  • The Miami Herald describes how desperate Venezuelans are turning to urban gardening.
  • The National Post looks at Kevin O’Leary’s interest in Canadian politics.
  • The Toronto Star reports on the lifting of the American arms sales embargo against Vietnam.
  • Wired notes Grindr can still be hacked to identify users’ locations.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Centauri Dreams considers agriculture in space.
  • Crooked Timber examines the tribalisms which benefit Donald Trump.
  • Dangerous Minds notes an angry New York City television editorial criticizing the Sex Pistols.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes the cycles of Mars’ north polar gap.
  • Language Log talks about Chinese script, starting with Ted Chiang’s criticisms.
  • The LRB Blog speculates about the future of a Labour Party that has lost its working-class support.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen likes the Chinese city of Qingdao.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes the dispatch of the OSIRIS-REx probe to the launch pad.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders what solution Bernie Sanders is proposing for Puerto Rico.
  • Understanding Society describes sociological frameworks for writing biographies.
  • Window on Eurasia speculates the doping scandal may cost Russia not only the Olympics but FIFA in 2018, and is unsurprised by Gorbachev’s support of the annexation of Crimea.

[NEWS] Some Friday links

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  • Bloomberg looks at Argentina’s push for renewable energy, reports on Rosatom’s interest in developing South Africa as an entry into the African nuclear market, writes about China’s opposition to anything remotely like separatism in Hong Kong, and looks at Poland’s demand for an apology for Bill Clinton critical of the new government.
  • Bloomberg View notes the importance of honest statistics in Brazil, and calls for American arms sales to a friendly Vietnam.
  • CBC notes new Conservative support for a transgender rights bill and reports on how Ontario’s climate policy will hit Alberta’s natural gas exports.
  • Gizmodo notes Portugal has just managed to power itself entirely on renewable energy for four days.
  • The Inter Press Service describes the Middle Eastern refugee crisis.
  • The National Post looks at a proposed New York State ban on declawing cats.
  • Open Democracy reports on Norway’s EU status via a left-leaning Norwegian, looks at the life of Daniel Berrigan, and notes the emergent Saudi-Indian alliance.
  • Universe Today describes the circumstellar habitable zones of red giants.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • The Big Picture shares photos of a Shanghai neighbourhood that refuses to sell out to developers.
  • James Bow rates California rail.

  • Centauri Dreams looks at the large dwarf planet 2007 OR10.
  • Dangerous Minds notes a campaign by a 9/11 conspiracy theorist to raise funds to buy an airplane and a building.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze looks at the Kepler-223 system.
  • Language Hat looks at an astonishingly thorough German-led effort to publish a dictionary of Latin.
  • The NYRB Daily assesses the Iran nuclear deal.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer considers Brazil and argues that any treachery in Sykes-Picot was less in the deal and more in the assumptions behind it.
  • Transit Toronto notes the return of GO Transit’s seasonal trains to Niagara.
  • Window on Eurasia notes Moscow’s refusal to allow Circassians a memorial march.

[NEWS] Some Tuesday links

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  • Business Insider looks at the sad state of a project to build a Chinese bullet train in Venezuela.
  • Bloomberg notes the profound unconstitutionality of Donald Trump’s suggestion that the US national debt might be renounced, looks at the needs of the Brazilian economy, and suggests Poland’s economic nationalism is viable.
  • CBC reports that Sinéad O’Connor is safe in Chicago.
  • National Geographic shares hidden pictures of the Cultural Revolution.
  • The National Post notes the discovery of what might be the ruins of an old fort at Lunenburg.
  • Open Democracy suggests that Brexit, by separating the City of London from the European Union, could trigger the end of globalization, also taking a look at the popularity of populism.
  • Reuters notes the softening of the terms of a Chinese-Venezuelan loan arrangement.
  • The Washington Post notes the migration of some Ethiopian-Americans to a booming Ethiopia.
  • Wired looks at how natural gas will be used to move beyond the Haber-Bosch process which has created fertilizer for a century.

[NEWS] Some Monday links

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  • Bloomberg notes Canadian-born Bank of England governor Mark Carney’s criticism of Brexit, looks at the continuing exodus of Somalis from their homeland, and looks at an unusual crisis with the creditors of Turkey’s central bank.
  • CBC looks at the human cost of the one-child policy in China, reports on Maxine Bernier’s decision to run for the Conservative Party leadership, notes that many cell phones have their FM radio chips turned off, and looks at the undue criticism of Sophie Gregoire-Trudeau for wanting help.
  • The Globe and Mail notes the lack of interest among Canadians in radically changing Canadian content rules.
  • MacLean’s looks at Québec’s careful policy on the sharing economy and shares Kathryn Borel’s interview with Anne Kingston.
  • National Geographic writes about the intelligence of birds.
  • The National Post notes a Washington State mall’s decision to accept Canadian dollars on par on holiday weekends.
  • Universe Today reports on a Japanese 3-D map of galaxies stretching billions of light years that confirms Einstein’s theory of relativity.
  • The Verge notes the compelling postmodernist fictions written by Google’s AI.
  • Wired reports about the genesis of Eurekalert.
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