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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘chinese language

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Anthrodendum recommends design researcher Jan Chipchase’s Field Study Handbook for anthropologists interested in field practice.
  • Architectuul investigates strange similarities between buildings built in far-removed parts of the world.
  • Centauri Dreams takes a look at TESS, the next generation of exoplanet-hunting satellite.
  • Crooked Timber investigates the connections between the spiritualism of the 19th century and the fiction of the uncanny.
  • D-Brief notes the many names, often delightful, that newly-discovered locations on Mercury and Charon have received.
  • Cody Delistraty investigates two exhibitions of French satirists, including Charlie Hedo’s Georges Wolinski, to examine the nature of satire.
  • The Dragon’s Tales considers the possibility of cryomagna leaving marks on the surface of Europa.
  • Drew Ex Machina takes a look at the strangely alien skies of TRAPPIST-1e. What would its sun look like? How would the other planets appear?
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at the new prominence of multigenerational households in the United States. While a response to economic strains, it also looks back to past traditions.
  • Hornet Stories notes how, on RuPaul’s Drag Race, Monet X Change gave a decent explanation behind the surprisingly recent birth of the modern British accent.
  • Imageo notes how a massive blob of warm water is rising to the surface of the Pacific.
  • At In A State of Migration, Lyman Stone explores the unique population history of Maine, to my eyes easily the most Atlantic Canadian of the fifty American states.
  • JSTOR Daily links to a paper exploring why modern video games can produce such rewarding experiences for players. (We can get meaning from many places.)
  • Language Log takes a look at the complexity of Chinese language classifications with a song by Yishi Band. What exactly is Yibin Sichuanese?
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money takes a look at an interesting question: When did Jews in the United States become white?
  • The LRB Blog takes a look at the baffling reasons behind the poisoning of the Skribins with Novichok, and the science behind it.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that this year, GDP per capita measured at PPP in Spain is higher than in Italy. (This probably says more about the disarray in Italy.)
  • The NYR Daily shares an interesting interview with cartoonist Art Spiegelman.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw tells of his experiences on a trip to the small Australian city of Armidale, in the region of New England.
  • Justin Petrone reflects on the tidy and clean, minimalist even, rural landscape of Estonia.
  • Progressive Download’s John Farrell notes brain scans that provide evidence of consciousness even in very young infants.
  • Drew Rowsome praises the Toronto production of the musical Fun Home, based on the Alison Bechdel graphic novel. I, for one, can’t wait to see it.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that, although Proxima Centauri is far too active a star for Proxima Centauri b to be Earth-like, that world could still plausibly host life-supporting environments.
  • Ilya Somin at the Volokh Conspiracy suggests a recent deal at the federal level in the US between Trump and Cory Gardner has created space for states to legalize marijuana without fear of federal intervention.
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[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • ‘Nathan Burgoine at Apostrophen links to a giveaway of paranormal LGBT fiction.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares some stunning photos of Jupiter provided by Juno.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly looks at the desperate, multi-state strike of teachers in the United States. American education deserves to have its needs, and its practitioners’ needs, met.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at PROCSIMA, a strategy for improving beamed propulsion techniques.
  • Crooked Timber looks at the history of the concept of the uncanny valley. How did the concept get translated in the 1970s from Japan to the wider world?
  • Dangerous Minds shares a 1980s BBC interview with William Burroughs.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to a paper tracing the origin of the Dravidian language family to a point in time 4500 years ago.
  • JSTOR Daily notes Phyllis Wheatley, a freed slave who became the first African-American author in the 18th century but who died in poverty.
  • Language Hat notes the exceptional importance of the Persian language in early modern South Asia.
  • Language Log looks at the forms used by Chinese to express the concepts of NIMBY and NIMBYism.
  • Language Hat notes the exceptional importance of the Persian language in early modern South Asia.
  • The NYR Daily notes that, if the United States junks the nuclear deal with Iran, nothing external to Iran could realistically prevent the country’s nuclearization.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at the latest findings from the Jupiter system, from that planet’s planet-sized moons.
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes that many Rohingya, driven from their homeland, have been forced to work as mules in the illegal drug trade.
  • Starts With A Bang considers how early, based on elemental abundances, life could have arisen after the Big Bang. A date only 1 to 1.5 billion years after the formation of the universe is surprisingly early.
  • Strange Maps’ Frank Jacobs notes how the centre of population of different tree populations in the United States has been shifting west as the climate has changed.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little takes a look at mechanisms and causal explanations.
  • Worthwhile Canadian Initiative’s Frances Woolley takes a look at an ECON 1000 test from the 1950s. What biases, what gaps in knowledge, are revealed by it?

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Centauri Dreams considers methods for detecting early life telescopically on exoplanets.
  • Crooked Timber considers how legislators bear personal responsibility, morally at least, for consequences of the legislations that they pass.
  • Bruce Dorminey reports that the new TESS telescope may well be capable of spotting dense clouds of satellites in geosynchronous orbit of exoplanets as distant as 100 light years.
  • Far Outliers considers how in Iran, the veil worn by a woman was a status symbol, for her husband and family as much as for the woman.
  • Language Hat reports on the strange survival of the classical manuscript Alexandra.
  • Language Log suggests that the Confucius Institute network set up by China does not seem to spread Chinese language so much as Chinese culture.
  • As the Mueller investigation continues, Lawyers, Guns and Money suggests many of the players in the Trump Administration are facing a real-life version of the prisoner’s dilemma.
  • The Map Room Blog notes how maps of London’s Chiswick have been compiled into a public mural.
  • The NYR Daily has an amusing sketched review of the Michaelangelo exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum. (My pictures will be coming!)
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at some of the fashion unveiled by Gucci in their recent Milan show.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains how cosmic inflation means that, despite the speed of light and the universe’s age of 13.8 billion years, we can see things now 46 billion light years away.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little looks at some of the social factors going into nuclear accidents.
  • Window on Eurasia reports a familiar sort of pattern, of Central Asian migrants held in Russian prisons spreading Islam among their fellow detainees.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Crooked Timber seeks advice for academics trying to publish general-interest books.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas considers the extent, and the way, in which technological change can outstrip the ability of cultures and institutions to manage this change.
  • Hornet Stories notes the many ways in which the Trump Presidency is proving to be terrible for HIV-positive people around the world.
  • Sara Jaffe at JSTOR Daily explores the concept of queer time. What is time like for queer people if the traditional markers of adulthood–marriage, children, and so on–are unavailable? How do they think of life stages?
  • Language Log looks at the complexities of language in Hong Kong under Chinese rule.
  • Drew Rowsome reports on the latest theatre piece of Jordan Tannahill, Declarations.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on declining flows of migrants from elsewhere in the former Soviet Union to Russia.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • At Antipope, Charlie Stross takes a look at the dystopian future we’ve created for ourselves with the help of Big Data.
  • Kambiz Kamrani at Anthropology net notes the discovery of an Ancient Beringian population involved in the peopling of the Americas.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait considers the awesome possibility of life on pulsar planets, i.e. on planets that survived or were made by a supernova.
  • Centauri Dreams suggests that dust, not ET artifacts, may explain the odd light coming from KIC 8462852, aka Boyajian’s Star.
  • Crooked Timber considers the surprisingly mixed emotions of unions regarding the idea of a guaranteed minimum income.
  • Far Outliers takes a look at the diverse non-German soldiers serving in occupied France in the Second World War.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas considers parallels between the mentality of Silicon Valley and totalitarianism.
  • Hornet Stories considers the questionable idea of a “gold star” or “platinum star” gay person. What, exactly, is being celebrated?
  • JSTOR Daily notes the gendered nature of the supermarket of mid-20th century North America.
  • Language Hat celebrates the establishment of Hakka as an official language in Taiwan, as does Language Log.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money argues that the previous Oregon laws against self-service gas stations helped boost employment for the vulnerable.
  • Lingua Franca considers the concept of “ghosting”, linguistically at otherwise.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper examining how creativity has clustered in cities in the past.
  • Out There shares the arguments of Charles Miller for infrastructure to support crewed expansion and settlement in space, starting with the Moon.
  • Peter Rukavina talks about his last visit, with his son, to the Sears store in Charlottetown.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that 2018 may be the year we finally take a picture of a black hole, Sagittarius A* in the heart of our galaxy.
  • To what extent is history probabilistic? Understanding Society considers.
  • Window on Eurasia notes controversy in Siberia over Chinese investors who come in and disregard local sensitivities and regulations.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Centauri Dreams considers, in the context of ‘Oumuamua, the import of shads and axis ratios. What does it suggest about the processes by which planetary systems form?
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes a report suggesting that Russia is not at all likely to legalize bitcoins.
  • At A Fistful of Euros, Alex Harrowell takes a look at Article 63, the German constitutional article that governs the selection of the Chancellor.
  • The Frailest Thing quotes a passage from Jacques Ellul about the adaptation of humans to a mechanized world.
  • Hornet Stories notes that out actor Russell Tovey is set to play the (also out) Ray in the Arrowverse, an anti-Nazi superhero from an alternate Earth.
  • Language Hat tells the story of Lin Shu, an early 20th century translator of European fiction into Chinese whose works were remarkably influential.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money is amused by the story of a young university student who has used basic knowledge of Foucault to play with his family’s household rules.
  • The LRB Blog notes the very awkward, and potentially fatal, position of the Rohingya, caught between Burma and Bangladesh.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a talk recently given on fake maps, on maps used to lie and misrepresent and propagandize.
  • The NYR Daily meditates on the precocity and the homoeroticism inherent in the Hart Crane poem “The Bridge.”
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that we can see, so far, only a surprisingly small fraction of the observable universe. (So far.)
  • The Volokh Conspiracy celebrates the many defeats of Trump as he fights against sanctuary cities as a victory for federalism and against executive power.
  • Window on Eurasia notes a poll suggesting that, after 2014, while Crimeans may feel less Ukrainian they do not necessarily feel more Russian.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look, linguistically, at an Ian Frazier phrase: “That is aliens for you.”

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the remarkably enduring supernova iPTF14hls, which seems to have attained its longevity through massive amounts of antimatter.
  • blogTO notes plans for the construction of a new public square in Chinatown, on Huron Street.
  • James Bow shares a short story of his, set in a future where everyone has a guaranteed minimum income but few have a job.
  • A poster at Crasstalk shares a nostalgic story about long-lost summers as a child in Albuquerque in the 1960s.
  • Bruce Dorminey reports on Universe, a beautiful book concerned with the history of astronomical imagery.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog explores the latent and manifest functions of education for job-seekers.
  • Far Outliers’ Joel talks about the Red Terror imposed by Lenin in 1918, and its foreshadowing of the future of the Soviet Union.
  • Language Hat links to a lovely analysis of a Tang Chinese poem, “On the Frontier.”
  • Language Log notes how the name of Chinese food “congee” ultimately has origins in Dravidian languages.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money takes note of the suspicious timing of links between the Trump family and Wikileaks.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen recounts his visit to an Amazon bookstore, and what he found lacking (or found good).
  • The NYR Daily notes the continuing controversy over the bells of the church of Balangiga, in the Philippines, taken as booty in 1901 by American forces and not returned.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders why Canadian incomes and productivity have historically been 20-30% lower than those of the United States, and why incomes have lately caught up.
  • Roads and Kingdoms considers the simple pleasures of an egg and cracker snack in the Faroe Islands.
  • Strange Company considers the bizarre 1910 murder of Massachusetts lawyer William Lowe Rice.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes an Australian publisher that suspended publication of a book in Australia for fear of negative reaction from China.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares some photos of his orchids, blooming early because of warm temperatures.