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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘christianity

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • The Boston Globe‘s Big Picture shares photos of Massachusetts’ Mattapan trolley.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at Planet Nine’s effects and examines the weather of Titan.
  • Both The Dragon’s Tales and the Planetary Society Weblog react to the loss of the Schiaparelli lander.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze looks for brown dwarf exoplanets.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw reports on the sheer scale of the Australian real estate boom.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the beginning of an antiwar movement among Russian Orthodox faithful.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares a photo of a flowering tree in a Kyoto garden.

[PHOTO] Angus Bernard MacEachern in the shadow of St. Dunstan’s, Charlottetown

In the shadow of Charlottetown’s St. Dunstan’s Basilica on Great George Street stands a statue of Angus Bernard MacEachern, the Scottish immigrant to early British Prince Edward Island who brought Roman Catholicism to the territory.

Statue, Angus Bernard MacEachern #pei #charlottetown #greatgeorgestreet #statue #romancatholicism #latergram #stdunstans

Of note is the multilingualism of the plaque explaining MacEachern’s life and works, in English, French, Gaelic and Mi’kmaq.

MacEachern's multilingualism #pei #charlottetown #greatgeorgestreet #statue #romancatholicism #latergram #stdunstans #english #français #gàidhlig #mikmaq

St. Dunstan’s stands above it all.

St. Dunstan's in the evening #pei #charlottetown #greatgeorgestreet #statue #romancatholicism #latergram #stdunstans

[URBAN NOTE] “Flock sticks with atheist United Church minister”

Moira Welsh’s article in the Toronto Star describes how the congregation of United Church of Canada minister Gretta Vosper, whose church has recommended her removal from her position on account of her disbelief in core tenets of Christianity, remains loyal to her. I appreciate the congregation’s loyalty, and think there may be much good in Vosper’s arguments. I just question whether the United Church is the right place for it.

Jeanne Hamel has been a member of the United Church since its formation in Toronto, 91 years ago.

Today, as a longtime member of the West Hill United Church congregation in Scarborough, Hamel, 96, knows where her loyalties lie.

Hamel is sticking with Gretta Vosper, the United Church minister who was told by church leaders that she is “not suitable” because she calls herself an atheist and preaches about love without referring to Jesus Christ.

“Wherever Gretta goes, I go,” said Hamel, after the Sunday morning service. “My heart left the United Church when I heard they had rejected Gretta. I was stunned.”

About 200 people attended the service at West Hill, at Morningside Rd. and Kingston Rd., on Sunday morning — the first service since the church’s Toronto Conference Review Committee released a 39-page report last Wednesday on the minister’s non-traditional views.

“In our opinion, she is not suitable to continue in ordained ministry because she does not believe in God, Jesus Christ or the Holy Spirit,” the report stated.

Written by Randy McDonald

September 12, 2016 at 8:15 pm

[NEWS] Some Saturday links

  • Bloomberg notes Venezuela’s hopes for an oil price at $US 50, looks at Labour keeping the current London mayor’s seat, observes the vulnerability of Afghan refugees in Pakistan, and warns of a possible drought in the US Corn Belt.
  • Bloomberg View notes the continuing fragmentation of the Orthodox Church, and suggests Putin might accept a partial ban on Russian athletes at the Olympics.
  • CBC looks at Russia’s state-supported soccer hooliganism.
  • MacLean’s notes Florida theme parks’ concerns re: alligator attacks, and notes how homophobia complicates the grieving process for survivors of the Orlando shooting victims.
  • National Geographic looks at the logic chopping behind South Korea’s whale hunt, and observes that some coral reefs have coped.
  • The National Post notes Russia’s professed interest in improved relations with Canada.
  • Open Democracy frames the Orlando shooting in the context of an international campaign by ISIS.
  • The Toronto Star suggests Portugal’s decriminalization of drugs is a model for Canada.

[URBAN NOTE] “Same-sex, gender talk leads Halton Catholic trustees to vote down policy”

Again: Why do we fund separate school systems, with public money even, if they want to retain the right to hurt students? From the Toronto Star:

Halton Catholic trustees have rejected an update to the school board’s discipline and anti-bullying policy after one raised concerns that mentioning sexual orientation or gender identity could violate religious teachings.

The changes had previously been approved, unanimously, by a trustee committee and at last week’s full board meeting it was explained that the updates are in line with what’s required under the provincial Education Act and Ontario’s Human Rights Code, said Chair Jane Michael.

“It was a shock to all of us, I believe,” said Michael, who expected the amendments — which she considered part of a routine update — to easily pass. Instead, they failed on a 4-3 vote.

And because the board is “already so far behind” in making the required changes that were ready back in February, Ontario’s Ministry of Education “was waiting for an affirmative answer (last) Wednesday morning” after the board meeting, Michael said.

The policy, which covers discipline and safety in schools, will now go back to the same committee, and she’s hoping it will reappear, as is, on the board’s June meeting agenda.

Written by Randy McDonald

May 25, 2016 at 8:15 pm

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Centauri Dreams continues the debate over whether KIC 8462582 has been dimming.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the collection, organized by the Romanian Orthodox Church, of three million signatures against same-sex marriage.
  • The LRB Blog considers racism in old works of fiction.
  • The NYRB writes on the handles of Wittgenstein.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog notes a migration of Chinese prostitutes to Africa.
  • Towleroad notes the defense by an Arkansas television station of a gay reporter who works there.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy reports on a poll suggesting Native Americans do not care much about the name of the Washington Redskins.
  • Window on Eurasia warns that Mongolia’s dams of rivers feeding into Lake Baikal might kill the lake, and notes the Russian economic crisis is making the military more attractive to job-seekers.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares photos of three native flowering plants of California.

[URBAN NOTE] “Toronto’s black history unearthed in excavation of landmark church”

John Lorinc reports for the Toronto Star about a fascinating dig on the site of an old African Canadian church, the British Methodist Episcopal church in the middle of Toronto.

It has been called “one of the most important blocks of black history in Toronto,” a place where African Americans, fleeing slavery, found refuge to live, work and worship.

On this tract of land, just north of Osgoode Hall, a handful of African Methodists built a small wood frame church in 1845. It served as the spiritual and political centre of the city’s growing black community, which was asserting its voice in the abolitionist movement and welcoming an influx of families seeking freedom via the Underground Railroad.

Eventually, the congregation outgrew the tiny church and replaced it with a handsome brick temple. But after more than a century, membership dwindled, the congregation moved and the temple was sold off. In the late 1980s, the building was demolished to make way for a parking lot and, until last fall, the church was largely forgotten.

Now, with that same lot being prepared for the development of a new state-of-the-art provincial courthouse, the rich history of Chestnut St.’s British Methodist Episcopal Church has resurfaced, along with that of the 19th-century neighbourhood surrounding it.

Hundreds of thousands of artifacts have been discovered at the 0.65-hectare site — larger than a football field — near University Ave. and Dundas St. Infrastructure Ontario, the government agency overseeing construction, provided the Toronto Star with unique access to the five-month dig, considered one of the most extensive urban archeological projects in North America.

Unearthed ceramics, tools, toys and remnants of clothing are helping to compose a fascinating and largely untold story of the distant origins of Toronto’s diversity.

“Archeology often becomes the voice for the people without history,” says Holly Martelle, the consulting archeologist for the dig.

Written by Randy McDonald

May 23, 2016 at 11:15 pm