A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘cities

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: New York City, Los Angeles, Paris, Venice, Istanbul

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  • The OS/2 operating system is used in New York City to run that metropolis subway system. VICE reports.
  • The problem of homelessness in Los Angeles, the Guardian reports, is shocking.
  • CityLab reports on plans for new sorts of urban forests outside famous landmarks in Paris.
  • DW reports on how people in Venice protest against the intrusions of huge cruise ships into their lagoon, threatening the delicate environment.
  • Guardian Cities reports on how the hipster class in Istanbul has begun to migrate to the countryside, driven out of their city by real estate prices and by politics.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Guelph, Hamilton, Lethbridge, Moncton, Halifax

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  • blogTO suggests some things people could do on a day trip to Guelph (and commenters come up with more suggestions).
  • The lack of explicitly queer spaces in Hamilton is one thing that has come up in a recent study. Global News reports.
  • The Alberta city of Lethbridge, third-largest in the province, now has a population of more than one hundred thousand people. Global News reports.
  • Will the city of Moncton get rainbow crosswalks? Global News reports.
  • Halifax has faced complications in trying to pursue a commuter rail option. Global News reports.

[URBAN NOTE] Five links on cities; Frank Lloyd Wright, populism, Paris Syndrome, neon, Speed

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  • CityLab reports on how a 3-D printer is being used to print models of some lost works of Frank Lloyd Wright, here.
  • CityLab features an interview with French geographer Christophe Guilluy, who argues that populism is driven by the anger of the people left behind by globalization outside of major urban centres.
  • BBC examines “Paris Syndrome”, the psychotic state sometimes incited by travel to a famed destination.
  • CityLab looks at the 20th century history of neon signage.
  • Nathan Smith at The Outline makes the case that Speed, 25 years old, makes an excellent case for the importance of mass transit including buses, as a mode of transit open to all.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Hamilton, Québec City, San Jose, Tehran, Hong Kong

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  • Real estate in Hamilton, Ontario, is quite affordable by GTA standards. Global News reports.
  • Québec City has a new farmer’s market to replace an old. CBC reports.
  • San Jose, California, is set to embark on a grand experiment in cohousing, CityLab reports.
  • These vast abandoned apartment blocks in the desert outside of Tehran speak of economic underperformance, to say the least. Messynessychic has it.
  • Now that Hong Kong has not just competition from other cities in China but is finding itself outmatched by the likes of Shenzhen and Shanghai, the city-state’s bargaining power is accordingly limited. The SCMP reports.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait looks at Abell 30, a star that has been reborn in the long process of dying.
  • Centauri Dreams uses the impending launch of LightSail 2 to discuss solar sails in science fiction.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber, as part of a series of the fragility of globalization, considers if migration flows can be reversed. (He concludes it unlikely.)
  • The Crux considers if the record rain in the Midwest (Ontario, too, I would add) is a consequence of climate change.
  • D-Brief notes that the failure of people around the world to eat enough fruits and vegetables may be responsible for millions of premature dead.
  • Dangerous Minds introduces readers to gender-bending Italian music superstar Renato Zero.
  • Dead Things notes how genetic examinations have revealed the antiquity of many grapevines still used for wine.
  • Gizmodo notes that the ocean beneath the icy crust of Europa may contain simple salt.
  • io9 tries to determine the nature of the many twisted timelines of the X-Men movie universe of Fox.
  • JSTOR Daily observes that the Stonewall Riots were hardly the beginning of the gay rights movement in the US.
  • Language Log looks at the mixed scripts on a bookstore sign in Beijing.
  • Dave Brockington at Lawyers, Guns, and Money argues that Jeremy Corbyn has a very strong hold on his loyal followers, perhaps even to the point of irrationality.
  • Marginal Revolution observes that people who create public genetic profiles for themselves also undo privacy for their entire biological family.
  • Sean Marshall at Marshall’s Musings shares a photo of a very high-numbered street address, 986039 Oxford-Perth Road in Punkeydoodle’s Corners.
  • The NYR Daily examines the origins of the wealth of Lehman Brothers in the exploitation of slavery.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares a panorama-style photo of the Apollo 11 Little West Crater on the Moon.
  • Drew Rowsome notes that classic documentary Paris Is Burning has gotten a makeover and is now playing at TIFF.
  • Peter Rukavina, writing from a trip to Halifax, notes the convenience of the Eduroam procedures allowing users of one Maritime university computer network to log onto another member university’s network.
  • Dylan Reid at Spacing considers how municipal self-government might be best embedded in the constitution of Canada.
  • The Speed River Journal’s Van Waffle pays tribute to the wildflower Speedwell, a name he remembers from Watership Down.
  • Strange Maps shares a crowdsourced map depicting which areas of Europe are best (and worst) for hitchhikers.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the distribution of native speakers of Russian, with Israel emerging as more Russophone than some post-Soviet states.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Montréal, New York City, London, Ljubljana, Tokyo

  • CTV News reports that affordable rentals in Montréal are starting to disappear.
  • New York City’s High Line Park has celebrated its 10th anniversary. Has this beautiful park driven gentrification? Global News reports.
  • Guardian Cities reports on a recent London exhibition that profiles that city’s buried rivers and streams.
  • Guardian Cities looks at how Ljubljana managed to radically reduce its waste.
  • Guardian Cities wonders if this year will be the year that the metropolis of Tokyo opens up and internationalizes.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Fredericton, Amsterdam, Athens, Barcelona, Riga

  • The city of Fredericton hopes a new strategy to attracting international migration to the New Brunswick capital will help its grow its population by 25 thousand. Global News reports.
  • Guardian Cities notes the controversy in Amsterdam as users of moped find themselves being pushed from using bike lanes.
  • Guardian Cities looks at how many in Athens think the city might do well to unbury the rivers covered under concrete and construction in the second half of the 20th century.
  • The Sagrada Familia, after more than 130 years of construction, has finally received a permit for construction from Barcelona city authorities. Global News reports.
  • Evan Gershkovich at the Moscow Times reports on how the recent ousting of the mayor of the Latvian capital of Riga for corruption is also seem through a lens of ethnic conflict.