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Posts Tagged ‘clash of ideologies

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Adam Fish at anthro{dendum} compares different sorts of public bathing around the world, from Native America to Norden to Japan.
  • Charlie Stross at Antipope is unimpressed by the person writing the script for our timeline.
  • Architectuul reports on an architectural conference in Lisbon.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares stunning photos of the eruption of the Raikoke volcano in Kamchatka.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at what the Voyager spacecraft have returned about the edge of the solar system.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber takes issue with the idea of bipartisanship if it means compromising on reality, allegorically.
  • The Crux counts the number of people who have died in outer space.
  • D-Brief notes that the Andromeda Galaxy has swallowed up multiple dwarf galaxies over the eons.
  • Dead Things notes the identification of the first raptor species from Southeast Asia, Siamraptor suwati.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes a paper tracing the origins of interstellar comet 2/Borisov from the general area of Kruger 60.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog writes about the privilege allowing people access to affordable dental care.
  • Gizmodo tells how Alexei Leonov survived the first spacewalk.
  • io9 looks at the remarkable new status quo for the X-Men created by Jonathan Hickman.
  • Selma Franssen at the Island Review writes about the threats facing the seabirds of the Shetlands.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at what led Richard Nixon to make so many breaks from the American consensus on China in the Cold War.
  • Language Log notes an undergraduate course at Yale using the Voynich Manuscript as an aid in the study of language.
  • Abigail Nussbaum at Lawyers, Guns and Money explains her recent experience of the socialized health care system of Israel for Americans.
  • The LRB Blog looks at how badly the Fukuyama prediction of an end to history has aged.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a few maps of the new Ottawa LRT route.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a paper establishing a link between Chinese industries undermining their counterparts in Mexico and Mexican social ills including crime.
  • Sean Marshall reports from Ottawa about what the Confederation Line looks like.
  • Adam Shatz at the NYR Daily looks at the power of improvisation in music.
  • Roads and Kingdoms looks at South Williamsburg Jewish deli Gottlieb’s.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews</a the new Patti Smith book, Year of the Monkey.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a paper looking as the factors leading into transnational movements.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers the question of the direction(s) in which order in the universe was generated.
  • Window on Eurasia shares a report noting the very minor flows of migration from China to Russia.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at the politics in the British riding of Keighley.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at some penguin socks.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait reports suggestions the bizarre happenings at Boyajian’s Star could be explained by an evaporating exomoon.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at how the crowdsourced evScope telescope is being used to support the Lucy mission to the Jupiter Trojans.
  • The Crux explains the phenomenon of misophobia.
  • D-Brief shares suggestions that an asteroid collision a half-billion years ago released clouds of dust that, reaching Earth, triggered the mid-Ordovician ice age.
  • Dangerous Minds shares video of a perhaps underwhelming meeting of William Burroughs with Francis Bacon.
  • io9 makes the case for more near-future space exploration movies like Ad Astra.
  • Joe. My. God. notes a Trump retweeting of the lie that Ilham Omar celebrated on 9/11.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how fire could destroy the stressed rainforest of the Amazon.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how few judges in the US have been impeached.
  • The LRB Blog looks at how the already tenuous position of Haitians in the Bahamas has been worsened by Dorian.
  • The Map Room Blog looks at the importance of the integrity of official maps in the era of Trump.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at the political importance of marriage ceremonies in Lebanon and Gaza.
  • Drew Rowsome interviews the Zakar Twins on the occasion of their new play Pray the Gay Away, playing in Toronto in October.
  • The Russian Demographic Blog shares statistics on birthrates in the different provinces of the Russian Empire circa 1906.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel reports on the first experiment done on the photoelectric effect, revealing quantum mechanics.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at growing anti-Chinese sentiments in Central Asia.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at “The Hurtful Dog”, a Cyanide and Happiness cartoon.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes that mysterious Boyajian’s Star has nearly two dozen identified analogues, like HD 139139.
  • James Bow reports from his con trip to Portland.
  • Caitlin Kelly at the Broadside Blog notes the particular pleasure of having old friends, people with long baselines on us.
  • Centauri Dreams describes a proposed mission to interstellar comet C/2019 Q4 (Borisov).
  • The Crux notes how feeding cows seaweed could sharply reduce their methane production.
  • D-Brief notes that comet C/2019 Q4 is decidedly red.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes a claim that water-rich exoplanet K2-18b might well have more water than Earth.
  • Gizmodo reports on a claim that Loki, biggest volcano on Io, is set to explode in a massive eruption.
  • io9 notes that Warner Brothers is planning a Funko Pop movie.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the claim of Donald Trump that he is ready for war with Iran.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how people in early modern Europe thought they could treat wounds with magic.
  • Language Hat considers how “I tip my hat” might, translated, sound funny to a speaker of Canadian French.
  • Language Log considers how speakers of Korean, and other languages, can find word spacing a challenge.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the partisan politics of the US Supreme Court.
  • At the NYR Daily, Naomi Klein makes a case for the political and environmental necessity of a Green New Deal.
  • Peter Watts takes apart a recent argument proclaiming the existence of free will.
  • Peter Rukavina tells how travelling by rail or air from Prince Edward Island to points of the mainland can not only be terribly inconvenient, but environmentally worse than car travel. PEI does need better rail connections.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog examines how different countries in Europe will conduct their census in 2020.
  • Window on Eurasia shares the arguments of a geographer who makes the point that China has a larger effective territory than Russia (or Canada).
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at a 1971 prediction by J.G. Ballard about demagoguery and guilt, something that now looks reasonably accurate.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers models of segregation of cartoon characters from normal ones in comics.

[NEWS] Eleven politics links

  • The amount of money that has gone into the Doug Ford Ontario News Now propaganda videos–more than one hundred!–is shocking. Global News reports.
  • That Maxime Bernier is finding himself challenged, in his home region of the Beauce, by another Maxine Bernier is charming. Le Devoir has it.
  • The Times of London interview with David Cameron, three years after the Brexit referendum and with his new biography, is enlightening. (And shocking.)
  • There may well be, finally, a popular groundswell among Europeans to make the European Union more of a classical superpower. Bloomberg has it.
  • Shannon Gormley at MacLean’s looks at how, come 2047, Hong Kong is bound to see radical change.
  • At Bloomberg, David Fickling notes how populism plays a huge role in the economic divergence of Argentina from Australia, here.
  • India would lose out, it is argued, if it does not sign onto the China-led RCEP economic grouping. Bloomberg has it.
  • Did economic nationalism in central Europe make the region more resistant to the slowdown in Germany? Bloomberg considers.
  • VICE reports on how Trump supporters in the US Midwest are unhappy with continued globalization, here.
  • Global News reports on new interest in Ontario in diffusing immigration beyond the Greater Toronto Area, here.
  • Philippe J. Fournier reports at MacLean’s about the latest polling, suggesting the Liberals are on the edge of a majority.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes how variable gravity is on irregular asteroid Bennu.
  • Bruce Dorminey reports on how the European Southern Observatory has charted the Magellanic Clouds in unprecedented detail.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares a collection of links looking at the Precambrian Earth.
  • Andrew LePage at Drew Ex Machina reports on the late 1950s race to send probes to the Moon.
  • Gizmodo shares some stunning astronomy photos.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on the saltwater roads, the routes that slaves in Florida used to escape to the free Bahamas.
  • Language Log looks at some examples of bad English from Japan. How did they come about?
  • Paul Campos at Lawyers, Guns and Money rejects the idea of honouring people like Condoleezza Rice.
  • Marginal Revolution considers the idea of free will in light of neurology.
  • Corey S Powell at Out There interviews James Lovelock on his new book Novacene, in which Lovelock imagines the future world and Gaia taken over by AI.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the water shortages faced by downstream countries in Central Asia.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Architectuul shares photos from a bike tour of Berlin.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait reports on new evidence that exocomets are raining on star Beta Pictoris.
  • Larry Klaes at Centauri Dreams reviews the two late 1970s SF films Alien and Star Trek I, products of the same era.
  • D-Brief reports on Hubble studies of the star clusters of the Large Magellanic Cloud.
  • Bruce Dorminey shares Gemini telescope images of interstellar comet C/2019 Q4 (Borisov).
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares video of Space X’s Starhopper test flight.
  • Far Outliers notes the import of the 13th century Norman king of England calling himself Edward after an Anglo-Saxon king.
  • Gizmodo notes that not only can rats learn to play hide and seek, they seem to enjoy it.
  • io9 notes the fantastic high camp of Mister Sinister in the new Jonathan Hickman X-Men run, borrowing a note from Kieron Gillen’s portrayal of the character.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Guiliani’s soon-to-be ex-wife says he has descended from 911 hero to a liar.
  • Language Log looks at the recent ridiculous suggestion that English, among other languages, descends from Chinese.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the brief history of commemorating the V2 attacks on London.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the practice in Saskatchewan of sterilizing First Nations women against their consent.
  • Marginal Revolution suggests that farmers in Brazil might be getting a partly unfair treatment. (Partly.)
  • The Planetary Society Blog explains why C/2019 Q4 (Borisov) matters.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that, for the first time, immigrants from Turkmenistan in Belarus outnumber immigrants from Ukraine.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomy notes the remarkably eccentric orbit of gas giant HR 5138b.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the impact that large-scale collisions have on the evolution of planets.
  • Chris Bertram at Crooked Timber noted yesterday that babies born on September 11th in 2001 are now 18 years old, adults.
  • The Crux notes that some of the hominins in the Sima de los Huesos site in Spain, ancestors to Neanderthals, may have been murdered.
  • D-Brief reports on the cryodrakon, a pterosaur that roamed the skies above what is now Canada 77 million years ago.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at the political artwork of Jan Pötter.
  • Gizmodo notes a poll suggesting a majority of Britons would support actively seeking to communicate with extraterrestrial civilizations.
  • io9 has a loving critical review of the first Star Trek movie.
  • JSTOR Daily shares, from April 1939, an essay by the anonymous head of British intelligence looking at the international context on the eve of the Second World War.
  • Language Log notes a recent essay on the mysterious Voynich manuscript, one concluding that it is almost certainly a hoax of some kind.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the future of the labour movement in the United States.
  • Marginal Revolution considers what sort of industrial policy would work for the United States.
  • Yardena Schwartz writes at NYR Daily about the potential power of Arab voters in Israel.
  • Jim Belshaw at Personal Reflections explains why, despite interest, Australia did not launch a space program in the 1980s.
  • Drew Rowsome provides a queer review of It: Chapter Two.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how government censorship of science doomed the Soviet Union and could hurt the United States next.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how, in the Volga republics, recent educational policy changes have marginalized non-Russian languages.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares a glossy, fashion photography-style, reimagining of the central relationship in the James Baldwin classic Giovanni’s Room, arranged by Hilton Als.