A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘comets

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares the latest from exoplanet PDS 70b, which has a gain in mass that has actually been detected by astronomers.
  • The Crux considers what information, exactly, hypothetical extraterrestrials could extract from the Golden Record of Voyager. Are the messages decipherable?
  • D-Brief shares the most detailed map yet assembled of Comet 67P, compiled from images taken by the Rosetta probe.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog writes about the way changing shopping malls reflect, and influence, changes in the broader culture.
  • Hornet Stories notes that, while Pope Francis may not want parents of gay children to cut their ties, he does think the parents should look into conversion therapy.
  • JSTOR Daily links to a paper examining how beekeeping in early modern England led to the creation of a broader pattern of communications and discourse on the subject.
  • Language Hat shares the story of an American diplomat in 1960s Argentina, and his experiences learning Spanish (after having spoken Portuguese) and travelling in the provinces.
  • Language Log shares a biscriptal ad from Hong Kong.
  • The LRB Blog shares a story told by Harry Stopes about a maritime trip with harbour pilots from Cornwall.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares an anecdote of a family meal of empanadas in the Argentine city of Cordoba during the world cup.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why, in the early universe, the most massive stars massed the equivalent of a thousand suns, much larger than any star known now.
  • Towleroad shares Karl Schmid’s appearance on NBC Today, where he talked with Megyn Kelly about HIV in the era of undetectability.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the many obstacles placed by the Russian government in the way of Circassian refugees from Syria seeking refuge in their ancestral North Caucasus homeland.

[NEWS] Five science links: BC fires, urban animal intelligence, Oort clouds, stars, dark energy

  • The fires of British Columbia are so vast that their smoke is reaching the west of France. Ici Radio-Canada reports.
  • Are the unique challenges posed by modern cities making the animals who live in them smarter? The Atlantic examines the issue.
  • Universe Today notes that the Oort clouds of other stars may well be visible on microwave frequencies.
  • Universe Today reports on the very recent finding that star formation in the Milky Way Galaxy shut down for billions of years, that we are in the middle of a second wave of star formation.
  • Do not fear: There is at least one hypothetical strategy that an arbitrarily advanced future civilization could adopt to minimize the effect of dark energy on its exploration of the universe. Universe Today reports.

[NEWS] Five sci-tech links: cometary disasters, ET malware, Kepler, bird language, Canadian rockets

  • Universe Today notes that, 12.8 thousand years ago, a disintegrating comet set a tenth of the Earth’s surface area on fire.
  • Should messages from extraterrestrial civilizations be automatically deleted on reception, for fear of their malware? Universe Today reports.
  • 14 different worlds detected by Kepler have been scanned for technological signatures of advanced civilizations. Universe Today reports.
  • Brandom Keim at National Geographic describes a fascinating study suggesting some birds–here, Japanese tits–have human-like rules for language and can picture in their mind’s eye the subjects of their communication.
  • CBC asks the perfectly sensible question why Canada does not have any indigenous rocket program.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the import of comet A/2017U1, a potential visitor from another planetary system, while Centauri Dreams also takes a look.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly celebrates Montréal’s Atwater Market, with photos.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes one report that Ceres’ primordial ocean may have mixed with its surface, to make a world covered in salty mud.
  • The Map Room Blog links to an interactive French-language map looking at census data on different neighbourhoods in different cities.
  • The New APPS Blog looks at the changing role of the judiciary as enforcing of order in a privatized world.
  • The NYR Daily wonders if North Korea’s government has firm control over its nuclear weapons, given American issues.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes the expansion of Google Maps to other worlds in our solar system.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer examines the situation facing Catalonia, and Spain, after the UDI.
  • Roads and Kingdoms takes a photographic look at Little Mogadishu, a Somali neighbourhood in Kampala, Uganda.
  • Rocky Planet notes the ongoing risk of a major volcanic eruption at Tinakula, in the Solomon Islands.
  • Understanding Society takes a look at the role and functioning of overlapping social identities.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Anthrodendum considers what, exactly, anthropology majors can do job-wise with their degrees. Interesting ideas.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the possible origins of cometary organics in deep space.
  • Hornet Stories talks of anti-immigrant Americans with immigrant ancestors who skirted relevant laws themselves, like Donald Trump.
  • Language Hat considers byssus, an exotic ancient textile and a word with a complex history.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at how the potential for disaster in Florida is worsened by poor planning.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the sad intersection of war, xenophobia, and rising rates of polio in Pakistan (and elsewhere).
  • The Map Room Blog notes an interactive map-related play still showing at the Halifax Fringe, Cartography.
  • The NYR Daily notes a high-profile corruption trial of a former government minister in Moscow.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares Paul Schenk’s story about how he interned at JPL in 1979 for the Voyager 2 flyby.
  • Roads and Kingdoms looks at the search by a Brazilian man for caves in the south of that country.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy asks some interesting questions about the mechanics of Settlers of Catan.
  • At Whatever, John Scalzi remembers Jerry Pournelle.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Russia is strongly opposed to any Circassian return to their ancestral homeland.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Centauri Dreams reports on asteroid P/2016 G1, a world that, after splitting, is now showing signs of a cometary tail.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog considers outrage as a sociological phenomenon. What, exactly, does it do? What does it change?
  • Joe. My. God. reports on a new push for same-sex marriage in Germany, coming from the SPD.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money examines the Alabama government’s disinterest in commemorating the Selma march for freedom.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at Oxford University’s attempt to recruit white British male students.
  • At the NYRB Daily, Masha Gessen warns against falling too readily into the trap of identifying conspiracies in dealing with Trump.
  • pollotenchegg maps the distribution of Muslims in Crimea according to the 1897 Russian census.
  • Savage Minds takes a brief look at ayahuasca, a ritual beverage of Andean indigenous peoples, and looks at how its legality in the United States remains complicated.
  • Elf Sternberg considers the problems of straight men with sex, and argues they might be especially trapped by a culture that makes it difficult for straight men to consider sex as anything but a birthright and an obligation.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy considers how the complexities of eminent domain might complicate the US-Mexican border wall.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on protests in Russia and argues Belarus is on the verge of something.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • blogTO notes that Uniqlo will be giving away free thermal clothing tomorrow.
  • James Bow shares his column about the importance of truth.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly shares with us her mid-winter walk.
  • Centauri Dreams reports about cometary water.
  • Dangerous Minds shares German cinema lobby cards from the 1960s.
  • Language Hat talks about dropping apostrophes.
  • Language Log reports about lexical searches on Google.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reports on the latest from Trump.
  • The NYRB Daily shares a review of an Iranian film on gender relations.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes the ongoing gas price protests in Mexico.
  • Spacing links to some articles about affordable housing around the world.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes Germany’s abolition of a law forbidding insults to foreign heads of state.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that stable Russian population figures cover up a wholesale collapse in the numbers of ethnic Russians, and looks at the shortages of skilled workers faced by defense industries.