A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘coral

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait takes a look at the German city of Nordlingen, formed in a crater created by the impact of a binary asteroid with Earth.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on the possibility that the farside of the Moon might bear the imprint of an ancient collision with a dwarf planet the size of Ceres.
  • D-Brief notes that dredging for the expansion of the port of Miami has caused terrible damage to corals there.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at the last appearances of David Bowie and Iggy Pop together on stage.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that China is on track to launch an ambitious robotic mission to Mars in 2020.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog talks about what sociological research actually is.
  • Gizmodo reports on the discovery of a torus of cool gas circling Sagittarius A* at a distance of a hundredth of a light-year.
  • io9 reports about Angola Janga, an independent graphic novel by Marcelo D’Salete showing how slaves from Africa in Brazil fought for their freedom and independence.
  • The Island Review shares some poems of Matthew Landrum, inspired by the Faroe Islands.
  • Joe. My. God. looks at how creationists are mocking flat-earthers for their lack of scientific knowledge.
  • Language Hat looks at the observations of Mary Beard that full fluency in ancient Latin is rare even for experts, for reasons I think understandable.
  • Melissa Byrnes wrote at Lawyers, Guns and Money about the meaning of 4 June 1989 in the political transitions of China and Poland.
  • Marginal Revolution notes how the New York Times has become much more aware of cutting-edge social justice in recent years.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how the memories and relics of the Sugar Land prison complex outside of Houston, Texas, are being preserved.
  • Jason C Davis at the Planetary Society Blog looks at the differences between LightSail 1 and the soon-to-be-launched LightSail 2.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks in detail at the high electricity prices in Argentina.
  • Peter Rukavina looks at the problems with electric vehicle promotion on PEI.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at when the universe will have its first black dwarf. (Not in a while.)
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that Belarusians are not as interested in becoming citizens of Russia as an Internet poll suggests.
  • Arnold Zwicky highlights a Pride Month cartoon set in Antarctica featuring the same-sex marriage of two penguins.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Centauri Dreams reports on how dataset mining of K2 data revealed 18 more Earth-sized planets.
  • Crooked Timber speculates on how Clarence Thomas might rule on abortion given his public rulings.
  • D-Brief observes that some corals in Hawaii appear to thrive in acidic waters. Is there hope yet for coral reefs?
  • Karen Sternheimer writes at the Everyday Sociology Blog about how sociology and history overlap, in their subjects and in their methods.
  • Far Outliers examines how the last remnants of Soviet power faded quickly around the world in 1991.
  • Gizmodo looks at how an image of a rare albino panda has just been captured.
  • Joe. My. God. notes how Christian fundamentalists want to make the east of Washington State into a 51st state run by Biblical law.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how trees can minimize algae blooms in nearby water systems.
  • Victor Mair at Language Log takes issue with problematic pop psychology regarding bilingualism in Singapore.
  • Lawyers, Guns, and Money takes issue with trying to minimize court decisions like (for instance) a hypothetical overthrow of Miranda v. Arizona. (Roe v. Wade is what they are concerned with.)
  • The NYR Daily looks at the short storied life of avant-garde filmmaker Barbara Rubin.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why we can never learn everything about our universe.
  • Towleroad notes that downloads of the relationship app Hinge have surged after Pete Buttigieg said he met his now-husband there.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Ukraine is seeking to have the Kerch Strait separating Crimea from adjacent Russia declared an international body of water.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at what famed gay writer John Rechy is doing these days.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Architectuul interviews Vladimir Kulić, curator of the MoMA exhibition Toward a Concrete Utopia: Architecture in Yugoslavia, 1948–1980, about the history of innovative architecture in Yugoslavia.
  • The Crux takes a look at the long search for hidden planets in the solar system, starting with Neptune and continuing to Tyche.
  • D-Brief notes that ISRO, the space agency of India, is planning on launching a mission to Venus, and is soliciting outside contributions.
  • Drew Ex Machina’s Andrew LePage writes about his efforts to photograph, from space, clouds over California’s Mount Whitney.
  • Earther notes that geoengineering is being considered as one strategy to help save the coral reefs.
  • Gizmodo takes a look at the limits, legal and otherwise, facing the Internet Archive in its preservation of humanity’s online history.
  • JSTOR Daily explains why the Loch Ness monster has the scientific binominal Nessiteras rhombopteryx.
  • Language Hat links to “The Poor Man of Nippur”, a short film by Cambridge academic Martin Worthington that may be the first film in the Babylonian language.
  • The LRB Blog notes the conflict between West Bank settlers and Airbnb. Am I churlish to wish that neither side wins?
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper noting how quickly, after Poland regained its independence, human capital differences between the different parts of the once-divided country faded.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel takes a look at what it takes, in terms of element abundance and galactic structure, for life-bearing planets to form in the early universe, and when they can form.

[NEWS] Five science links: oceans, global warming, stars, Milky Way Galaxy, Sagittarius A*

  • CBC notes that a cold-water reef off of Cape Breton ravaged by fishing is showing signs of recovery.
  • Motherboard reports a study suggesting that the oceans have absorbed much more heat than previously thought, suggesting the margins to avoid climate change are thinner than imagined.
  • Paul M. Sutter at Universe Today notes how scarily large and massive blue giant stars can unlock key mysteries about stellar evolution.
  • Motherboard notes the latest, strong evidence for Sagittarius A* at the heart of the Milky Way Galaxy actually being a black hole.
  • Phys.org notes a new study suggesting that the inner core of the Milky Way Galaxy was formed by an ancient collision with a dwarf galaxy 10 billion years ago.

[LINK] “Coral Reefs Provide Crystal Ball for Future Change”

The Dragon’s Tales linked to Brian Kahn’s Scientific American article noting the negative effects of El Niño–and, climate change–on coral reefs.

Christmas Island sits about as close to the middle of the Pacific as you can get. The main island of Kiribati, a small island nation, is 3,300 miles from San Francisco, 3,800 miles from Brisbane and just 140 miles north of the equator. Its closest neighbor of note is Hawaii, which is still 1,250 miles away.

Some might say it’s as close to the middle of nowhere as you can get. But it’s at the center of one of the biggest climate events in decades. A super El Niño has raised water temperatures to unprecedented levels and it’s causing a massive coral die off.

Researchers are racing to track the impacts the warming is having on coral as well as what happens to the reefs when the waters cool. The work has implications well beyond an island in the middle of nowhere. How coral respond to this year’s El Niño offers a preview of what the rest of the world’s coral will face as the world continues to warm.

From the water’s surface, the coral reefs surrounding Christmas Island looked healthy. But as soon as Kim Cobb plunged below the azure waters that surround the world’s largest atoll, a new picture began to emerge on a November dive.

Once-vibrant reefs had lost their color. Ghostly white skeletons covered in a growing layer of green-brown algae created a desolate underwater landscape.

Written by Randy McDonald

December 21, 2015 at 3:07 pm