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Posts Tagged ‘crime

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the discovery of Ross 128 b, a nearby exoplanet that looks like it actually might be plausibly very Earth-like.
  • blogTO notes that, after a decade, the east entrance of the Royal Ontario Museum is finally going to be an entrance again.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about the importance of self-care, of making time to experience pleasure.
  • Crooked Timber shares some of the 1871 etchings of Gustave Doré, fresh from the Paris Commune.
  • Daily JSTOR notes how one man’s collection of old tin cans tells a remarkable story about the settlement of the United States.
  • Dangerous Minds shares a vintage 1980 television report on the Los Angeles punk scene.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes a recent study of chemical abundances around Kronos and Krios, two very similar stars near each other, these abundances suggesting they are just forming planetary systems.
  • Gizmodo shares a revealing new table of exoplanets, one that brings out all sorts of interesting patterns and types.
  • Hornet Stories notes Courtney Love’s efforts to fundraise for LGBTQ homeless youth.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Margaret Court, an Australian tennis star now more famous for her homophobia, called for Australia to ignore the postal vote for marriage equality.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money makes the point that Trump’s Russian links are important to explore, not least because they reveal the spreading influence of kleptocracy.
  • Lingua Franca shares a perhaps over-stereotypical take on languages being caught between drives for purity and for diversity.
  • The LRB Blog notes the murder of Honduran environmental activist Berta Cácares.
  • The Map Room Blog links to an interesting collection of links to future and alternate-history mass transit maps of Melbourne.
  • The NYR Daily links to an interesting exhibit about disposable fashion like the simple T-shirt.
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes a remarkable performance of a Beatles song in the hill country of West Bengal.
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[NEWS] Five links: American gun owners, Japanese inequality, Polish politics, Lexit, #elsagate

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  • The small minority of American gun owners who own huge numbers of guns, more than they could seemingly use, is the subject of this study at The Guardian.
  • The Japanese economy may be growing, but so is inequality, Bloomberg reports.
  • This Open Democracy examination of the sharpening political divides in Poland, particularly outside of Warsaw, is gripping. It starts with the self-immolation of Upper Silesian Piotr Szczęsny in his country’s capital.
  • Julian Savarer takes a look at the many problems with “Lexit”, the idea of a left-wing argument for Brexit.
  • James Bridle looks at the complex human and artificial mechanisms behind the production of so much wrong children’s video content. #elsagate is only the tip of it all. Medium hosts the article.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the remarkably enduring supernova iPTF14hls, which seems to have attained its longevity through massive amounts of antimatter.
  • blogTO notes plans for the construction of a new public square in Chinatown, on Huron Street.
  • James Bow shares a short story of his, set in a future where everyone has a guaranteed minimum income but few have a job.
  • A poster at Crasstalk shares a nostalgic story about long-lost summers as a child in Albuquerque in the 1960s.
  • Bruce Dorminey reports on Universe, a beautiful book concerned with the history of astronomical imagery.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog explores the latent and manifest functions of education for job-seekers.
  • Far Outliers’ Joel talks about the Red Terror imposed by Lenin in 1918, and its foreshadowing of the future of the Soviet Union.
  • Language Hat links to a lovely analysis of a Tang Chinese poem, “On the Frontier.”
  • Language Log notes how the name of Chinese food “congee” ultimately has origins in Dravidian languages.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money takes note of the suspicious timing of links between the Trump family and Wikileaks.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen recounts his visit to an Amazon bookstore, and what he found lacking (or found good).
  • The NYR Daily notes the continuing controversy over the bells of the church of Balangiga, in the Philippines, taken as booty in 1901 by American forces and not returned.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders why Canadian incomes and productivity have historically been 20-30% lower than those of the United States, and why incomes have lately caught up.
  • Roads and Kingdoms considers the simple pleasures of an egg and cracker snack in the Faroe Islands.
  • Strange Company considers the bizarre 1910 murder of Massachusetts lawyer William Lowe Rice.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes an Australian publisher that suspended publication of a book in Australia for fear of negative reaction from China.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares some photos of his orchids, blooming early because of warm temperatures.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly takes a look at the concept of resilience.
  • D-Brief notes the many ways in which human beings can be killed by heat waves.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes a claim for the discovery of a new pulsar planet, PSR B0329+54 b, two Earth masses with an orbit three decades long.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas argues that, in some was, online connectivity is like a drug.
  • Hornet Stories considers the plight of bisexuals in the closet.
  • Language Hat considers the origins of the family name of Hungarian Karl-Maria Kertbeny, the man who developed the term “homosexuality”, and much else besides.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how the item of soap was a key component behind racism and apartheid in South Africa.
  • Progressive Download’s John Farrell notes a new book, The Quotable Darwin.
  • Peter Rukavina takes a look at 18 years’ worth of links on his blog. How many are still good? The answer may surprise you.
  • Understanding Society considers the insights of Tony Judt on the psychology of Europeans after the Second World War.
  • John Scalzi at Whatever considers, in Q&A format, some insights for men in the post-Weinstein era.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at how boundaries in the Caucasus were not necessarily defined entirely by the Bolsheviks.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers various odd appearances of pickles in contemporary popular culture.

[NEWS] Four links: Ryerson poverty, Scarborough subway, G20 kettling, mapping the war dead of Canada

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  • Ryerson University students’ dependence on food banks only says terrible things about Toronto, higher education, and income inequality. CBC reports.
  • John Michael McGrath at TVO notes that the Scarborough subway simply cannot make sense as an economic transit project.
  • The rampant insincerity I am not only in detecting from the Toronto police service in the aftermath of the 2010 G20 kittling incident surely cannot serve them well. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Cartographer Patrick Cain maps the war dead of Canada, in cities across the country and in multiple conflicts. The sheer density of the dead is eye-opening. The maps are at Global News.

[NEWS] Four queer links: homophobia and adoption, Tori Amos, naturism, whisper networks

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  • Global News reports on a Edmonton couple surprised their anti-gay views disqualify them for adoption. Did they think they might not get a non-straight child?
  • Hornet Stories reports on how Tori Amos got her start playing piano in gay bars.
  • Mike Miksche reports for NewNowNext from a gay naturists’ resort. The place sounds quite wholesome.
  • Jesse Dorris at The New Yorker makes the point that gay/bi/queer men, too, need a whisper network to warn of threats. Being out is hard, but necessary for this.

Written by Randy McDonald

November 9, 2017 at 6:15 pm

[NEWS] Six notes about science: birds, Julie Payette, agriculture, wood in space, Enceladus, minds

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  • Can parrots, capable of speech, be witnesses in criminal cases? Maybe. Atlas Obscura reports.
  • Julie Payette’s speech in defense of science, regarding climate change and the like, might well have been a bit more politic. (Maybe.) MacLean’s looks at the controversy.
  • Was sedentary agricultural civilization a mistake, as some suggest? The New Republic reports on the state of the debate.
  • Scientific American reports on the United States’ 1960s probes Ranger 3 through 5, built partly of wood.
  • Universe Today notes a new model suggesting that a porous rocky core could help Enceladus keep a liquid water ocean for billions of years.
  • The Walrus reports on how two conjoined twins, who seem to have access to each other’s consciousness, are proving very interesting theories of mind.