A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘crimean tatars

[BLOG] Some Monday links

leave a comment »

  • Centauri Dreams reports on asteroid P/2016 G1, a world that, after splitting, is now showing signs of a cometary tail.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog considers outrage as a sociological phenomenon. What, exactly, does it do? What does it change?
  • Joe. My. God. reports on a new push for same-sex marriage in Germany, coming from the SPD.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money examines the Alabama government’s disinterest in commemorating the Selma march for freedom.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at Oxford University’s attempt to recruit white British male students.
  • At the NYRB Daily, Masha Gessen warns against falling too readily into the trap of identifying conspiracies in dealing with Trump.
  • pollotenchegg maps the distribution of Muslims in Crimea according to the 1897 Russian census.
  • Savage Minds takes a brief look at ayahuasca, a ritual beverage of Andean indigenous peoples, and looks at how its legality in the United States remains complicated.
  • Elf Sternberg considers the problems of straight men with sex, and argues they might be especially trapped by a culture that makes it difficult for straight men to consider sex as anything but a birthright and an obligation.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy considers how the complexities of eminent domain might complicate the US-Mexican border wall.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on protests in Russia and argues Belarus is on the verge of something.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomy shares a video imagining of how Cassini will meet its end with Saturn.
  • Cody Delistraty shares an interview with Rebecca Solnit.
  • Far Outliers reports on Margaret Thatcher’s unorthodox campaign in 1979.
  • Joe. My. God. shares Hillary Clinton’s thanks to her 66 million voters.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at gender stereotypes among scientists.
  • The NYRB Daily talks about the visual art of Pipilotti Rist.
  • Otto Pohl commemorates the 73rd anniversary of the deportation of the Kalmyks.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests China might follow Russia’s Crimea strategy in invading Taiwan, and looks at the latest on controversies about Tatar identity and genetics.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Bad Astronomy reports on the astounding scientific illiteracy of Trump advisor Anthony Scaramucci.
  • blogTO compiles a list of the best tobagganing hills in Toronto.
  • Citizen Science Salon looks at what we can do in the redwood forests.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes a gap in the disk of TW Hydrae.
  • Imageo notes that 2016 is the warmest year in the records.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that a pride parade protected by police went off in Montenegro.
  • Language Hat shares the story of Lazer Lederhendler, a son of Holocaust survivors in Montréal who became one of the leading translators into English of Québec literature.
  • Language Log looks at the distant origins of Japanese terms for “dog.”
  • Marginal Revolution notes the rising popularity of Vladimir Putin on the American right.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks at the links between Russia and the “Calexit” movement.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy celebrates Saturnalia.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at Russia’s use of genetics to disentangle the Tatar peoples and argues that the definition of Russians and Ukrainians as fraternal is dangerous to the latter.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Antipope’s Charlie Stross fears the arrival of fascism in Britain after the murder of Jo Cox.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on SDSSJ1043+0855, a white dwarf apparently consuming a rocky planet.
  • The Crux notes discussion of terraforming Mars.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes the revealing result of a study of the crops that ancient Indonesians brought to Madagascar.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog considers hierarchy has manifested in a dance competition being filmed for television.
  • The LRB Blog considers the state of Algerian and Arab-language literature.
  • The Map Room Blog maps migrant deaths in the Mediterranean.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the collapse of coal companies in the United States.
  • The Power and the Money notes that Puerto Rico is not a colony of the United States.
  • Savage Minds considers at length the situation of Crimea and of Crimean Tatars.
  • Window on Eurasia wonders if the West is forgetting about Ukraine.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Beyond the Beyond considers the floating mountains of Pluto.
  • The Boston Globe‘s Big Picture notes the story of a church that transitioned from an old-style church building to a storefront.
  • blogTO shares a photo of the Gardiner Expressway, closed for construction.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the search for life around red giant stars.
  • Crooked Timber criticizes left-wing Brexit proponents for the contradictions in their politics.
  • The Dragon’s Tales looks at mountain-building on Io.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas wonders if the kids are all right in an age of ubiquitous technology.
  • The LRB Blog notes Trump’s acceptance by Fox.
  • Otto Pohl shares a list of his articles dealing with the Crimean Tatars.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer examines air pollution and car traffic in Mexico City.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the political popularity of Sufis in Dagestan.
  • Arnold Zwicky celebrates actor Joe Dallesandro.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Charlie Stross at Antipope wonders what subtle techniques could be used to sabotage a modern technology firm.
  • Bad Astronomy notes the work that went into determining the origins of a high-energy neutrino.
  • blogTO praises the Toronto Islands.
  • Imageo shares this unsettling graphic depicting rising global temperatures over time.
  • The Map Room notes, using Amazon’s controversy over same-day delivery being coincidentally limited largely to areas with non-black populations, the problems involved with being blind about data.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen makes the case for Britain staying in the imperfect European Union.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that the new Brazilian government’s all-male cabinet required some work, given the presence of women in Brazil’s business life.
  • Transit Toronto looks at plans for new GO Station construction in the GTA.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at Russian coverage of Crimean Tatar Jamala’s song “1944” and her victory for Ukraine at Eurovision.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • blogTO notes that April has been the snowiest month this year.
  • D-Brief notes that we are on the verge of a literal explosion in gravitational wave astronomy detection.
  • The Dragon’s Tales examines Maya water management.
  • Far Outliers notes the 1709 rescue of Alexander Selkirk from a desert island, one of the inspirations behind Robinson Crusoe.
  • Geocurrents speculates that Crimean Tatars may follow North Caucasians in supporting radical Islam.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that a Republican co-sponsor of an anti-trans law has been quarantined as a danger to female co-workers.
  • Language Hat examines how one language deals with the representation of time.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a beautiful topographic map of Mars.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a new book by Joel Kotkin that seems somewhat anti-cities.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders if Irish independence could have been avoided.
  • Peter Rukavina contrasts and compares public spending and revenues on Prince Edward Island in 1915 versus 2015. The changes–particularly the increases–are notable.
  • Une heure de peine looks at the idea of the insider, in French.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Eastern religions are now seen as threatening by some Russians and looks at the construction of Russian influence networks in France.