A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘croatia

[DM] Some news links: fertility, population aging, migration, demography is not destiny, Eurabia

Over the past week, I’ve come across some interesting news reports about different trends in different parts of the world. I have assembled them in a links post at Demography Matters.

  • The Independent noted that the length and severity of the Greek economic crisis means that, for many younger Greeks, the chance to have a family the size they wanted–or the chance to have a family at all–is passing. The Korea Herald, meanwhile, noted that the fertility rate in South Korea likely dipped below 1 child per woman, surely a record low for any nation-state (although some Chinese provinces, to be fair, have seen similar dips).
  • The South China Morning Post argued that Hong Kong, facing rapid population aging, should try to keep its elderly employed. Similar arguments were made over at Bloomberg with regards to the United States, although the American demographic situation is rather less dramatic than Hong Kong’s.
  • Canadian news source Global News noted that, thanks to international migration, the population of the Atlantic Canadian province of Nova Scotia actually experienced net growth. OBC Transeuropa, meanwhile, observed that despite growing emigration from Croatia to richer European Union member-states like Germany and Ireland, labour shortages are drawing substantial numbers of workers not only from the former Yugoslavia but from further afield.
  • At Open Democracy, Oliver Haynes speaking about Brexit argued strongly against assuming simple demographic change will lead to shifts of political opinion. People still need to be convinced.
  • Open Democracy’s Carmen Aguilera, meanwhile, noted that far-right Spanish political party Vox is now making Eurabian arguments, suggesting that Muslim immigrants are but the vanguard of a broader Muslim invasion.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Oshawa, Simcoe County, Vancouver, Dublin, Dubrovnik

  • Kyle Cicerella at the Canadian Press reports on the close link in Oshawa between GM workers and their local OHL hockey team, the Oshawa Generals. The Global News hosts the article.
  • This long feature at Global News about the impact of the fentanyl epidemic in Simcoe County is heart-rending.
  • VICE reports on how the May Wah SRO hotel, an affordable haven for elderly Chinese-Canadians in downtown Toronto, managed to survive the threat of gentrification.
  • Guardian Cities reports on how Dublin is facing a serious homelessness crisis despite there being more than thirty thousand empty homes, held by landlord investors.
  • The English-language Dubrovnik Times reports that, apparently on the basis of thriving tourism, Dubrovnik stands out in Croatia as a place that has seen population growth.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Ryan Anderson at Anthrodendum takes a look at how the threat posed to coastal properties by sea level rise reveals much about how human beings assign value.
  • A BCer in Toronto’s Jeff Jedras writes about the food at a Newfoundlander party in Ottawa.
  • D-Brief considers how past ice ages might have been caused by the shifting poles.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at the work of Michelle Pannor Silver, looking at how retirement can influence the identities of individuals.
  • Far Outliers notes that, in its first major wars, Japan treated prisoners of war well.
  • JSTOR Daily examines a paper that takes a look at how the X-Men have achieved such resonance in pop culture, such power as symbols of minorities’ persecution and survival.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money is critical of the effusive press coverage of Mitt Romney, new Republican senator.
  • Geoffrey Pullum at Lingua Franca shares, for other English speakers, a lexicon of specialized words from the United Kingdom regarding Brexit.
  • At the LRB Blog, Hyo Yoon Kang takes a look at a series of legal hearings investigating the possibility of assigning legal responsibility for global warming to “carbon majors” like big oil.
  • Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution shares his argument that the history of the 21st century United States might look like that of the 19th century, with progress despite political disarray.
  • The NYR Daily shares the arguments of scholar of populism, Jan-Werner Müller, looking at what Cold War liberalism has to say now.
  • Peter Rukavina shares the story of his two visits to relatives around the Croatian city of Kutina, with photos.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at how astronomers solved the mystery of the “Zone of Avoidance”, the portions of space blotted out by the dense plane of our galaxy.
  • Window on Eurasia reports from a conference on minority languages where speakers complain about Russian government pressures against their languages.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at tea, starting with tea-time aphorisms and going further afield.

[ISL] Five islands links: Indonesia and Bali, Abba Vis, Iles-de-la-Madeleine, Scalpay, music

  • The Economist reports, with skepticism, on the proposal of the government of Indonesia to diffuse tourism beyond Bali to up to a dozen similar insular destinations.
  • Srećko Horvat at The Guardian fears that the latest Mamma Mia! film might make life impossible for the inhabitants of the Croatian island of Vis, where this movie was filmed.
  • André Lavoie at Le Devoir takes a look at the recent appearances of the Iles-de-la-Madeleine in Québec film.
  • Marg Greenwood at The Island Review writes, with photos, about a walk she took on the Scottish island of Scalpay.
  • Atlas Obscura writes about the sound map created by Andrew Pekler as a soundtrack for a tour of islands once mistakenly charted as existing.

[NEWS] Five cultural links: astronauts learning Chinese, hitchhiking, Catalonia, Croatia, Georgia

  • The BBC reports on how astronauts from Europe are starting to learn Chinese, the better to interacting with future fellow travelers.
  • MacLean’s takes a look at the practical disappearance of hitchhiking as a mode of travel in Canada, from its heights in the 1970s. (No surprise, I think, on safety grounds alone.)
  • PRI notes the practical disappearance of the quintessentially Spanish bullfight in Catalonia, driven by national identity and by animal-rights sentiment.
  • Transitions Online notes how the strong performance of Croatia at the World Cup, making it to the finals, was welcomed by most people in the former Yugoslavia.
  • Open Democracy notes how tensions between liberal and conservative views on popular culture and public life are becoming political in post-Soviet Georgia.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Mississauga, Kahnawake, Madrid, Helsinki, Mumbai

  • Croatian-Canadian fans in Mississauga were definitely organized and ready to celebrate the Croatian team playing in the World Cup finals. Global News reports.
  • People in Kahnawake are looking forward to an upcoming powwow, as a celebration of indigenous culture and a vehicle for reconciliation. Global News reports.
  • CityLab notes the progress that environmental initiatives in Madrid have had in bringing wildlife back to the Spanish capital.
  • Politico Europe reports on the mood in Helsinki on the eve of the Trump-Putin summit there. Avoiding a repetition of Munich was prominent in locals’ minds.
  • Namrata Kolachalam at Roads and Kingdoms reports from Mumbai on the negative environmental impact of a controversial statue of Marathi conqueror Shivaji on local fishing communities.

[NEWS] Three links on frontiers: Liberland, Catalonia, West Bank maps

  • GQ has a terribly unflattering article about the motivations and personalities behind the establishment of Liberland, a libertarian microstate on an island at the frontiers of Serbia and Croatia.
  • This extended examination of the issue of Catalonian separatism in Spain, taking a look at both sides of the conflicts, suggests this conflict may be intractable. The Atlantic has it.
  • Miriam Berger at Wired notes how the profound insufficiency of maps of the Palestinian-occupied areas of the West Bank forces Palestinians to turn to newcomer maps.me.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about her vacation in Croatia’s Istria.
  • Centauri Dreams highlights the work of citizen scientists who are producing stunning images of Jupiter through Juno data.
  • Cody Delistraty examines the unique history of Paris’ Maison de Verre, a house made entirely of glass.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes a recent study suggesting red dwarfs tend to produce stellar winds stripping exo-Earths of their atmospheres.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the mechanics of press censorship in a changing Burma.
  • Language Log’s Geoff Nunberg points out that the phrase “… in the woodpile” is indelibly marked with racism.
  • The NYR Daily remembers the life and notes the death of Xiu Liaobo.
  • Pamela MacNaughtan at Roads and Kingdoms tells the story of how she found the perfect lobster roll on the Iles-de-la-Madeleine.
  • The Signal shares a provocative discussion on the potential role and future decipherability of the emoji in language.
  • Towleroad shares a comforting legal analysis suggesting that marriage equality is not yet threatened in the United States.
  • Transit Toronto notes another weekend subway shutdown, this time on the Bloor line west from Ossington.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that this year will be critical for Russia’s future relationship with Tatarstan.
  • Unicorn Booty largely approves, as do I, of the controversial recent Teen Vogue guide to anal sex. Safe sex is informed sex.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares photos of the purple-heavy gardens of his neighbourhood in California.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Antipope’s Charlie Stross considers the question of how to build durable space colonies.
  • blogTO notes that the musical Hamilton might be coming to Toronto.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that European populations are descended from Anatolian farmers, not local hunter0-gatherers.
  • Far Outliers notes the plight of Czech and Slovak migrants in Russia following the outbreak of the First World War.
  • Language Log looks at new programs to promote the learning of Cantonese, outside of China proper.
  • Towleroad notes the sad story of a Belgian man who wants euthanasia because he’s ashamed of being gay.
  • The Financial Times‘ The World worries about the possible spread of illiberal democracy to Croatia.

[LINK] “Former Yugoslav States, Albania Vow to Step Up Drive to Join EU”

Bloomberg’s Jasmina Kuzmanovic and Gordana Filipovic report on the renewed push in the western Balkans for European Union membership. Certainly it’s not as if the western Balkans have any other future.

Former Yugoslav republics and neighboring Albania vowed to resuscitate their drive for European Union integration after the migrant crisis rocked the region and created the worst political rifts between Balkan states since the civil wars of the 1990s.

The heads of state for EU members Croatia and Slovenia and EU outsiders Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Macedonia, Kosovo and Albania signed a joint commitment to strengthening the stability and prosperity of the region. They also aim to strengthen ties to the U.S. and seek an expansion of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization deeper into the Balkans.

[. . .]

The western Balkans has been stretched by the flood of hundreds of thousands of migrants escaping the violence in Syria as well as refugees from as far away as Afghanistan and Northern Africa. Slovenia and Croatia strained their EU ties after Slovenia declared its intention to build fencing along the two countries’ shared border. The dispute is being echoed across the EU as governments grapple with a crisis on a scale not seen since the 1940s.

Written by Randy McDonald

November 26, 2015 at 3:02 pm