A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘cryptocurrency

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait, looking at the Moon, considers what a “small” crater is.
  • Citizen Science Salon looks at Amino Labs, a start-up that aims to enable people–even children–to use simple kits to engage in bioengineering.
  • Crooked Timber notes that the collapse in Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies means good things for the global environment.
  • The Crux considers the extent to which gender–gender identity, gendered roles–is unique to humans.
  • A Fistful of Euros considers the generalized extremism of the “filets jaunes” of France and where this might lead that country.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing shares the skepticism of Jacques Ellul in a “technical” humanism, one that seeks to ameliorate the details of a dehumanizing life.
  • Gizmodo considers how we can start preparing for the risks of powerful artificial intelligence to humans, even potentially existential ones.
  • The Island Review interviews Nancy Campbell, a writer concerned with the islands and cultures of the Arctic like Greenland.
  • Language Hat considers the idea of “efficient languages”. What does this idea even mean?
  • Language Log considers the potential impact of making English an official language on Taiwan.
  • The LRB Blog considers the political future of France.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how many people in Kyrgzystan are becoming angered by China’s Xinjiang policies.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers St. Bernard, in connection with dogs and otherwise.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: architecture, cryptocurrency condos, crime, police

  • Toronto Storeys shares the opinions of six architects as to their favourite buildings in the city.
  • Why is one condo owner in Toronto only accepting bitcoin payments from potential purchasers? Among other things, it makes things relatively easier for foreign buyers. CBC reports.
  • Marcel Theriault, one of the policeman accused of brutally beating Dafonte Miller, is also accused of misleading Durham Region police investigators. The Toronto Star reports.
  • University of Toronto doctoral student Sasha Reid identified the pattern of a serial killer at work in Toronto’s LGBTQ community, and told police. Their response? They thanked her and moved on. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Edward Keenan wonders why Toronto Police Chief Mark Saunders possibly thought he could say what he said about the community not helping, especially when the community has been warning about a serial killer while police denied anything. The Toronto Star has the article.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes that a recent massive flare at Proxima Centauri, one that made the star become a thousand times brighter, not only makes Proxima b unlikely to be habitable but makes it unlikely Proxima has (as some suggested) a big planetary system.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that South Korea, contrary to earlier reports, is not going to ban cryptocurrency.
  • Hornet Stories notes that six American states–Arkansas, Indiana, Kentucky, Missouri, Montana, and Oklahoma–have seen the introduction of legislation replacing marriage with a marriage contract, on account of marriage equality.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on the deep similarities and differences between serfdom in Russia and slavery in the United States, both formally abolished in the 1860s.
  • Language Hat links to a Telegraph article reporting on the efforts of different people to translate different ancient languages.
  • The New APPS Blog notes that, after Delta dropped its discount for NRA members, the pro-NRA governor of Georgia dropped tax breaks for the airline.
  • This call for the world to respond to the horrors in Syria, shared at the NYR Daily, is likely to fall on deaf ears.
  • At Strange Maps, Frank Jacobs shares some maps showing areas where the United States is truly exceptional.
  • Supernova Condensate notes how nested planetary orbits can be used to trace beautiful spirograph patterns.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how no one in the Soviet Union in 1991 was prepared to do anything to save the Soviet Union.