A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘cuba

[NEWS] Five JSTOR Daily links: doctors & drugs, horses & war, JFK, raisin wine, Irish & Ireland

  • JSTOR Daily notes how early doctors used to party with drugs as a matter of course.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the experiences of horses and donkeys in the US Civil War.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how the disaster of the Bay of Pigs changed the decision-making of JFK.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how early 19th century American Jews made use of raisin wine in Passover, and how this changed.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how the revival of the Irish language, connecting Ireland to the rest of Europe, played a key role in leading to independence for Ireland.

[URBAN NOTE] Five links about cities: dance, libraries, urban agriculture, density, H.P. Lovecraft

  • Guardian Cities raises an interesting possibility: Could choreographers contribute to better-designed cities?
  • CityLab considers if public libraries might taken on greater civic importance as archives for public data.
  • Miguel Altieri argues at The Conversation that urban agriculture can improve food security in American cities, drawing from models in Cuba and Argentina.
  • The more the density of residents and infrastructures increases, studies have found, the less the impact on the natural environment. Building up is green. Global News reports.
  • At CityMetric, Mark Clapham considers the city as it appears in the fiction of H.P. Lovecraft.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: London, Halifax, Cerro Belmonte, Munich, Hong Kong

  • CBC reports on a terrible incident of racist harassment at a London, Ontario Sobeys grocery store, where one man tried to detain someone non-white as a supposed “illegal.”
  • Global News reports on a scandal in Halifax’s growing Buddhist community, of sexual improprieties by a leader, here.
  • Ozy reports on how Fidel Castro helped the Madrid suburb of Cerro Belmonte fight off an expropriation bid, here.
  • Citylab discusses the proposal for an aerial gondola in Munich, as part of that city’s mass transit system.
  • Matthew Keegan at Guardian Cities describes how feng shui remains a central feature of design and architecture in Hong Kong.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • At Anthro{dendum}, Daniel Miller writes about how some of the food he cooks evokes his history in Cuba-influenced Tampa.
  • Bad Astronomer notes an astonishingly high-resolution image of protoplanet Vesta taken from the Earth.
  • The Big Picture shares photos of the Kakuma refugee camp, in Kenya.
  • Centauri Dreams notes one proposal to help extend the life of a Type III civilization in the Milky Way Galaxy by importing stars from outside of the local group.
  • Crooked Timber’s Corey Robin talks about changing minds in politics, inspired by the success of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.
  • Dangerous Minds shares the 1978 BBC documentary on surrealism, Europe After the Rain.
  • Far Outliers shares the third part of a summary of an article on African and Japanese mercenaries in Asia.
  • Hornet Stories reports on the regret of Buffy showrunner Martin Noxon that her show killed off Tara. (I agree: I liked her.)
  • At In Medias Res, Russell Arben Fox wonders what American farmers–by extension, perhaps, other farmers in other high-income societies–want. With their entire culture being undermine, what can they hope for?
  • Joe. My. God. notes how far-right groups in Europe are increasingly welcoming lesbian, gay, and bisexual members. (Not so much trans people, it seems.)
  • JSTOR Daily reports on the obvious utility of the humble beaver (in its North American homelands, at least).
  • Language Log considers the politics of the national language policy of China.
  • This Language Hat articlereporting on a conference on xenolinguistics, and the discussion in the comments, is fascinating. What can we hope to learn about non-human language? What will it have, and have not, in common?
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer considers the slow corruption of independent institutions in Mexico that may occur under the presidency of AMLO.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that, while we have not found life on Enceladus, we have found indicators of a world that could support life.
  • Window on Eurasia wonders if Russia is increasingly at risk of being displaced in Central Asia by a dynamic Kazakhstan.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Adam Fish at Anthro{dendum} takes a look at the roles of drones in capitalism, here.
  • Bad Astronomy talks about the discovery of a nascent planet in orbit of young star PDS 70.
  • Centauri Dreams notes what the discovery of a Charon eclipsing its partner Pluto meant, for those worlds and for astronomy generally.
  • D-Brief notes a demographic study of Italian centenarians suggesting that, after reaching the age of 105, human mortality rates seem to plateau. Does this indicate the potential for further life expectancy increases?
  • Dead Things shares the result of a genetics study of silkworms. Where did these anchors of the Silk Road come from?
  • Jonathan Wynn at the Everyday Sociology Blog considers the role of the side hustle in creative professions.
  • Far Outliers reports on the time, in the 1930s, when some people in Second Republic Poland thought that the country should acquire overseas colonies.
  • Hornet Stories reports on how, in earlier centuries, the English word “pinke” meant a shade of yellow.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on how, nearly two decades later, Sex and the City is still an influential and important piece of pop culture.
  • Language Hat links to Keith Gessen’s account, in The New Yorker, about how he came to teach his young son Russian.
  • Lingua Franca, at the Chronicle of Higher Education, reports on the decent and strongly Cuban Spanish spoken by Ernest Hemingway.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the mystique surrounding testosterone, the powerful masculinizing hormone.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer shares his thoughts on the election, in Mexico, of left-leaning populist Andrés Manuel López Obrador. Worst-case scenarios aren’t likely to materialize in the short and medium terms, at least.
  • Vintage Space notes how, at the height of the Cold War, some hoped to demonstrate American strength by nuking the Moon. (Really.)
  • Window on Eurasia links to an essayist who suggests that Russia should look to America as much as to Europe for models of society.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • James Bow shares a deeply personal memory about a streetcar stop by Queens Quay where his life was recently transformed.
  • D-Brief notes that antimatter is one byproduct of lightning. (Really.)
  • Daily JSTOR counsels against buying into the scam of “authenticity.”
  • Language Hat shares a 2005 essay by Patricia Palmer, talking about how the spread of English was intimately linked with imperialism, first in Ireland then overseas.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money is strongly against Black Friday.
  • The NYR Daily notes that Donald Trump’s hardline policies are not going to help bring about change in Cuba.
  • Out There talks about how we are able to be pretty sure that interstellar asteorid ‘Oumuamua is not an extraterrestrial artifact.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer tries to imagine, economically, what an American Ontario would be like.
  • Roads and Kingdoms talks about some good local beer enjoyed in Chiapas.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel shares a list of ten scientific phenomena we should be thankful for, if we want to exist.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares a photo of his Christmas bell flowering maple.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Apostrophen’s ‘Nathan Smith points to his blog post about the strengths of the chosen families of queer people, in life and in his fiction.
  • Beyond the Beyond’s Bruce Sterling revisits the politics behind France’s Minitel network, archaic yet pioneering.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly blogs about meeting her online friends in real life. Frankly, it would never occur to me not to do that.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at how Kepler’s exoplanets fall neatly into separate classes, super-Earths and mini-Neptunes.
  • The LRB Blog has a terrible report from Grenfell Tower, surrounded by betrayed survivors and apocalypse.
  • The Map Room Blog notes the inclusion of Canada’s First Nations communities on Google Maps.
  • The NYRB Daily’s Robert Cottrell explores the banalities revealed by Oliver Stone’s interviews of Putin.
  • The Planetary Society Blog’s Jason Davis considers the likely gains and challenges associated with missions to the ice giants of Uranus and Neptune.
  • Towleroad notes the new Alan Cumming film After Louie, dealing with a romance between an ACT-UP survivor and a younger man
  • The Volokh Conspiracy’s Ilya Somin does not find much good coming from Trump’s announced Cuba policy.
  • Window on Eurasia warns about the threat posed by Orthodox Christian fundamentalists in Russia.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait mourns the death of Apollo astronaut Gene Cernan and calls for a return to the Moon.
  • Beyond the Beyond’s Bruce Sterling wonders what future historiography will look like when it’s automatically assumed that British imperialism in South Asia was a bad thing.
  • blogTO highlights an impressive new condo tower planned for Mississauga.
  • D-Brief looks at how a literal heartbeat can transform the perception of an individual by race.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining the potential for exoplanets orbiting red dwarfs to be habitable, finding that there seem to be no deal-breakers.
  • Language Hat shares the reflections of Russian-born author Boris Fishman who reads his novel, written in English, translated into the Russian.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money links to a paper looking at the potential for industrial espionage to actually pay off.
  • The LRB Blog considers what will happen to Cuban migration now that Cuban migrants to the United States have no special status.
  • The NYRB Daily looks at post-revolutionary Cairo through film.
  • Savage Minds considers the grounds for potentially treating artificial intelligences as people.
  • Torontoist looks at two rival schools of medicine in 19th century Toronto.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes that Washington D.C.’s Freedom Plaza can be cleared of protests.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the potential financial catastrophe of Russia’s declining villages, and looks at Belarus’ national identity.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • At Apostrophen, ‘Nathan Smith talks about how he made a tradition out of Christmas tree ornamentation over the past twenty years.
  • blogTO notes that Toronto’s waterfront has major E Coli issues.
  • Crooked Timber notes the potential for the recent by-election in London, fought on Brexit and lost by the Tories, to mean something.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze reports on a search for radio flares from brown dwarfs.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that China has been installing ecologies on its artificial South China Sea islands.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog considers what it means to be an ally.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the complex peace negotiations in Colombia.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a map of American infrastructure.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a one-terabyte drive passed from person to person that serves as a sort of Internet in Cuba.
  • Towleroad notes a film project by one Leo Herrera that aims to imagine what prominent AIDS victims would have done and been like had their not been killed by the epidemic.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes the complexities surrounding Brexit.
  • Arnold Zwicky has had enough with linguistic prescriptivism.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Bad Astronomy notes the discovery of massive ice deposits underneath Mars’ Utopia Planitia.
  • blogTO shares photos of what the new TTC buses will look like.
  • Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly describes a lovely exhibition of the artifacts of the life of Charlotte Brontë in New York City.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to two papers on the detection of exomoons.
  • Itching for Eestimaa notes how Estonia, despite wanting solitude and independence, keeps getting dragged into global geopolitics.
  • Joe. My. God. notes Mike Pence’s improbable arguments that he did not, in fact, support ex-gay conversion “therapy”.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes Castro’s positive contributions to the fight against apartheid, and looks at the colonial booze trade.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the economic incentives for prostitution in a time of austerity.
  • The Map Room Blog maps the shifting and shrinking ice of the Arctic.
  • Marginal Revolution links to an interview with an anthropologist who wonders about the knowledge of others that ubiquitous AI would allow. (The example given is of cows who can adjust their milking schedules.)
  • THe NYRB Daily reflects on Cuba after Castro.
  • Otto Pohl talks about the fate of Soviet Kurds under Stalin.
  • Window on Eurasia argues the Soviet Union was falling apart and is skeptical of a Russian plan to create a hierarchy for Russia’s Muslim populations.