A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘david bowie

[NEWS] Seven Christmas links: Bowie and Bing, horror, ghosts, holidays, xenophobia, Elf on the Shelf

  • Dangerous Minds shares the story of the remarkable duet between Bing Crosby and David Bowie.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at the 1980 horror film To All A Goodnight.
  • Strange Company shares a strange story, of a ghostly choir reportedly heard in 1944, here.
  • Caitlin Kelly at the Broadside Blog writes about why she and her husband each take Christmas seriously.
  • Paul Campos at Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the xenophobia behind the idea of a War on Christmas, going back to the anti-Semitism of Henry Ford.
  • JSTOR Daily carries suggestions that the idea of the Grinch, from Dr. Seuss, has anti-Semitic origins.
  • VICE makes the case for the creepiness of the Elf on the Shelf in the context of a surveillance society, here.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait urges caution in identifying K2-18b, a mini-Neptune with water vapour in its atmosphere, as Earth-like.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on the discovery of C/2019 Q4 (Borisov), a likely interstellar comet like ‘Oumuamua.
  • The Crux reports on the orange roughy, a fish commonly caught as byproduct that can live up to 250 years.
  • D-Brief looks at the harm that may be caused by some insecticides to songbirds, including anorexia and delayed migrations.
  • Dangerous Minds considers if David Bowie actually did burn his 360-ton Glass Spider stage prop.
  • Gizmodo notes the formidable, fanged marsupials once existing in Australia.
  • Imageo notes signs that a dreaded blob of hot water, auguring climate change, might now be lurking in the Pacific Ocean.
  • io9 notes that Ryan Murphy has shared the official title sequence for the 1984 season of American Horror Story.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the history, in popular culture and actual technology, of the artificial womb.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at how lightly the Sackler family got off for their involvement in triggering the opioid crisis with OxyContin.
  • Marginal Revolution notes many companies are now seeking insurance to protect themselves in the US-China trade war.
  • Tim Parks writes at the NYR Daily about how every era tends to have translations which fit its ethos.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a paper suggesting that immigration and immigrants do not have major effects on the overall fertility of highly-developed countries.
  • Frank Jacobs notes a mysterious 1920s German map of South America that shows Brasilia, the Brazilian capital built only from 1956. What is up with this?
  • Window on Eurasia reports on the negative effects of massive migration of workers from Tajikistan on the country’s women.

[MUSIC] Five music links: Rouge, David Bowie, Taylor Swift, Dixie Chicks, maps

  • Dangerous Minds looks/u> at obscure 1970s glam punk band Rouge, from Japan.
  • Dangerous Minds points readers to the excellent David Bowie fan comic, the biographical “The Side Effects of the Cocaine”.
  • Taylor Swift made a wonderful donation to the Regent Park School of Music.
  • I do agree with Anne T. Donahue at CBC Arts Mthat country music needs more of the innovative challenges brought by the Dixie Chicks.
  • CityLab shares a playlist of songs dealing, in one way or another, with maps.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait takes a look at the German city of Nordlingen, formed in a crater created by the impact of a binary asteroid with Earth.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on the possibility that the farside of the Moon might bear the imprint of an ancient collision with a dwarf planet the size of Ceres.
  • D-Brief notes that dredging for the expansion of the port of Miami has caused terrible damage to corals there.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at the last appearances of David Bowie and Iggy Pop together on stage.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that China is on track to launch an ambitious robotic mission to Mars in 2020.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog talks about what sociological research actually is.
  • Gizmodo reports on the discovery of a torus of cool gas circling Sagittarius A* at a distance of a hundredth of a light-year.
  • io9 reports about Angola Janga, an independent graphic novel by Marcelo D’Salete showing how slaves from Africa in Brazil fought for their freedom and independence.
  • The Island Review shares some poems of Matthew Landrum, inspired by the Faroe Islands.
  • Joe. My. God. looks at how creationists are mocking flat-earthers for their lack of scientific knowledge.
  • Language Hat looks at the observations of Mary Beard that full fluency in ancient Latin is rare even for experts, for reasons I think understandable.
  • Melissa Byrnes wrote at Lawyers, Guns and Money about the meaning of 4 June 1989 in the political transitions of China and Poland.
  • Marginal Revolution notes how the New York Times has become much more aware of cutting-edge social justice in recent years.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how the memories and relics of the Sugar Land prison complex outside of Houston, Texas, are being preserved.
  • Jason C Davis at the Planetary Society Blog looks at the differences between LightSail 1 and the soon-to-be-launched LightSail 2.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks in detail at the high electricity prices in Argentina.
  • Peter Rukavina looks at the problems with electric vehicle promotion on PEI.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at when the universe will have its first black dwarf. (Not in a while.)
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that Belarusians are not as interested in becoming citizens of Russia as an Internet poll suggests.
  • Arnold Zwicky highlights a Pride Month cartoon set in Antarctica featuring the same-sex marriage of two penguins.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomy notes how the occultation of distant stars by nearby asteroids can help astronomers determine stars’ size.
  • D-Brief notes the remarkable achievements of some scientists in reviving the brains of pigs hours after their death.
  • Dangerous Minds takes a look at how David Bowie got involved in The Man Who Fell To Earth.
  • Dead Things looks at the recent identification of the late Cretaceous dinosaur Gobihadros.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes that astronomers have determined an interstellar meteorite likely hit the Earth in 2014.
  • Gizmodo reports on a very dim L-dwarf star 250 light-years away, ULAS J224940.13−011236.9, that experienced a massive flare. How did it do it?
  • Hornet Stories shares some vintage photos of same-sex couples from generations ago being physically affectionate.
  • At The Island Review, Nancy Forde writes about motherhood and her experience on Greenland, in the coastal community of Ilulissat.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how Paris’ Notre-Dame has always been in a process of recreation.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns, and Money notes the continuing oppression of workers in Bangladesh.
  • The LRB Blog notes the flaws in the defense, and in the political thinking, of Julian Assange. (Transparency is not enough.)
  • The NYR Daily reports on how photographer Claudia Andujar has regarded the Yanomami as they face existential challenges.
  • The Planetary Society Blog traces the crash of Beresheet on the Moon to a software conflict.
  • Ilya Somin at the Volokh Conspiracy warns against the idea of inevitable moral progress.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the desires of some Russian conservatives to see Russia included in a European Union dominated by neo-traditionalists.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Charlie Stross at Antipope notes</u. the many problems appearing already with 2019, starting with Brexit.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait examines the mysterious AT2018cow event. What was it?
  • blogTO notes that the Ontario government seems to be preparing for a new round of amalgamation, this time involving Toronto neighbours.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about her strategies for minimizing her personal waste, including buying expensive durables.
  • D-Brief shares Chang’e-4 photos taken on the far side of the Moon.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes an innovative design for a steam-powered asteroid hopper.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog writes about verstehen, the process of coming to an understanding of a subject, as demonstrated in the Arlene Stein study Unbound about trans men.
  • Gizmodo looks at the remarkably complex nascent planetary system of the quarternary star system HD 98800.
  • Imageo shares a visualization of the terrifyingly rapid spread of the Camp Fire.
  • JSTOR Daily debunks the myth of Wilson’s unconditional support for the Fourteen Points.
  • Language Hat notes a new study that claims to provide solid grounds for distinguishing dialects from languages.
  • Language Log looks at what David Bowie had to say about the Internet in 1999, and how he said it.
  • Christine Gordon Manley writes about her identity as a Newfoundlander.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the very variable definitions of urbanization in different states of India as well as nationally.
  • Emily Lakdawalla at the Planetary Society Blog shares a few more images of Ultima Thule.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews a new Toronto production of Iphegenia and the Furies.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how a fifth dimension might make the instantaneous spore drive of Discovery possible.
  • Window on Eurasia links to an article examining eight misconceptions of Russians about Belarus.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Anthrodendum reviews the book Fistula Politics, the latest from the field of medical anthropology.
  • Architectuul takes a look at post-war architecture in Germany, a country where the devastation of the war left clean slates for ambitious new designers and architects.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at newly discovered Kuiper Belt object 2008 VG 18.
  • Laura Agustín at Border Thinking takes a look at the figure of the migrant sex worker.
  • Centauri Dreams features an essay by Al Jackson celebrating the Apollo 8 moon mission.
  • D-Brief notes how physicists manufactured a quark soup in a collider to study the early universe.
  • Dangerous Minds shares some photos of a young David Bowie.
  • Angelique Harris at the Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at what the social sciences have to say about sexuality and dating among millennial Americans.
  • Gizmodo notes the odd apparent smoothness of Ultima Thule, target of a very close flyby by New Horizons on New Year’s Day.
  • Hornet Stories notes the censorship-challenging art by Slava Mogutin available from the Tom of Finland store.
  • Imageo shares orbital imagery of the eruption of Anak Krakatau in Indonesia, trigger of a devastating volcanic tsunami.
  • Nick Stewart at The Island Review writes beautifully about his experience crossing the Irish Sea on a ferry, from Liverpool to Belfast.
  • Lyman Stone at In A State of Migration shares the story, with photos, of his recent whirlwind trip to Vietnam.
  • JSTOR Daily considers whether or not fan fiction might be a useful tool to promote student literacy.
  • Language Hat notes a contentious reconstruction of the sound system of obscure but fascinating Tocharian, an extinct Indo-European language from modern XInjiang.
  • Dan Nexon at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the irreversible damage being caused by the Trump Administration to the United States’ foreign policy.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a paper suggesting users of Facebook would need a payment of at least one thousand dollars to abandon Facebook.
  • Lisa Nandy at the NYR Daily argues that the citizens of the United Kingdom need desperately to engage with Brexit, to take back control, in order to escape catastrophic consequences from ill-thought policies.
  • Marc Rayman at the Planetary Society Blog celebrates the life and achievements of the Dawn probe.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that so many Venezuelans are fleeing their country because food is literally unavailable, what with a collapsing agricultural sector.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog breaks down polling of nostalgia for the Soviet Union among Russians.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that simply finding oxygen in the atmosphere of an exoplanet is not by itself proof of life.
  • Ilya Somin at the Volokh Conspiracy reports on how the United States is making progress towards ending exclusionary zoning.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi shares an interview with the lawyer of Santa Claus.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on a fascinating paper, examining how some Russian immigrants in Germany use Udmurt as a family language.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at the lives of two notable members of the Swiss diaspora in Paris’ Montmartre.

[MUSIC] Five music links: The Music Man, Raine Maida, David Bowie, 70s, Erland Cooper

  • JSTOR Daily reports on how the 1962 movie The Music Man, based on the earlier musical, became a major Cold War export of the US even as small-town America was changing.
  • This Global News interview with Raine Maida, lead singer of Our Lady Peace, makes me positive-nostalgic for the 1990s.
  • NPR reported on the discovery of David Bowie’s first demo, from 1963, some time ago, but this still amazes me.
  • At In Media Res, Russell Arben Fox took a look at the 1970s song “Hot Child in the City”.
  • The Island Review interviewed multi-instrumentalist Erland Cooper and shared some of his music, inspired by the culture and the sound of the Orkneys.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

Many things accumulated after a pause of a couple of months. Here are some of the best links to come about in this time.

  • Anthrodendum considers the issue of the security, or not, of cloud data storage used by anthropologists.
  • Architectuul takes a look at the very complex history of urban planning and architecture in the city of Skopje, linked to issues of disaster and identity.
  • Centauri Dreams features an essay by Ioannis Kokkidinis, examining the nature of the lunar settlement of Artemis in Andy Weir’s novel of the same. What is it?
  • Crux notes the possibility that human organs for transplant might one day soon be grown to order.
  • D-Brief notes evidence that extrasolar visitor ‘Oumuamua is actually more like a comet than an asteroid.
  • Bruce Dorminey makes the sensible argument that plans for colonizing Mars have to wait until we save Earth. (I myself have always thought the sort of environmental engineering necessary for Mars would be developed from techniques used on Earth.)
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog took an interesting look at the relationship between hobbies and work.
  • Far Outliers looks at how, in the belle époque, different European empires took different attitudes towards the emigration of their subjects depending on their ethnicity. (Russia was happy to be rid of Jews, while Hungary encouraged non-Magyars to leave.)
  • The Finger Post shares some photos taken by the author on a trip to the city of Granada, in Nicaragua.
  • The Frailest Thing’s L.M. Sacasas makes an interesting argument as to the extent to which modern technology creates a new sense of self-consciousness in individuals.
  • Inkfish suggests that the bowhead whale has a more impressive repertoire of music–of song, at least–than the fabled humpback.
  • Information is Beautiful has a wonderful illustration of the Drake Equation.
  • JSTOR Daily takes a look at the American women who tried to prevent the Trail of Tears.
  • Language Hat takes a look at the diversity of Slovene dialects, this diversity perhaps reflecting the stability of the Slovene-inhabited territories over centuries.
  • Language Log considers the future of the Cantonese language in Hong Kong, faced with pressure from China.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how negatively disruptive a withdrawal of American forces from Germany would be for the United States and its position in the world.
  • Lingua Franca, at the Chronicle, notes the usefulness of the term “Latinx”.
  • The LRB Blog reports on the restoration of a late 19th century Japanese-style garden in Britain.
  • The New APPS Blog considers the ways in which Facebook, through the power of big data, can help commodify personal likes.
  • Neuroskeptic reports on the use of ayahusasca as an anti-depressant. Can it work?
  • Justin Petrone, attending a Nordic scientific conference in Iceland to which Estonia was invited, talks about the frontiers of Nordic identity.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw writes about what it is to be a literary historian.
  • Drew Rowsome praises Dylan Jones’ new biographical collection of interviews with the intimates of David Bowie.
  • Peter Rukavina shares an old Guardian article from 1993, describing and showing the first webserver on Prince Edward Island.
  • Seriously Science notes the potential contagiousness of parrot laughter.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little t.com/2018/06/shakespeare-on-tyranny.htmltakes a look at the new Stephen Greenblatt book, Shakespeare on Power, about Shakespeare’s perspectives on tyranny.
  • Window on Eurasia shares speculation as to what might happen if relations between Russia and Kazakhstan broke down.
  • Worthwhile Canadian Initiative noticed, before the election, the serious fiscal challenges facing Ontario.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell points out that creating a national ID database in the UK without issuing actual cards would be a nightmare.
  • Arnold Zwicky reports on a strand of his Swiss family’s history found in a Paris building.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the unusual exoplanet HIP 65426 b, orbiting its parent star in a very distant orbit. Why is that?
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly shares some photos from an evening spent at the Metropolitan Opera in New York City.
  • Centauri Dreams imagines what could have been if Voyager 1 had, as some hoped, gone on to Pluto. What discoveries would have been made, decades before New Horizons by a probe with less capable instrumentation?
  • Dangerous Minds takes a look at David Bowie’s mid-1970s nadir, caught up in an oddly vegetarianism-driven panic over psychic espionage.
  • At In A State of Migration, Lyman Stone uses a variety of demographic, cultural, and economic markers to define the Rust Belt of the United States.
  • JSTOR Daily notes that, at one point, American funerals included swag, nice gifts to mourners like sets of gloves.
  • Language Hat notes a language of the Pakistani Himalayas, Badeshi, that turns out not to be quite completely extinct.
  • Justin Petrone, at north!, celebrates his discovery of a familiar type, an Italian coffeeshop owner, in his adopted Estonia.
  • Out There considers the remarkable potential of exploration and telescopic study at the edge of our solar system.
  • The Planetary Society Blog’s Emily Lakdawalla notes that the Japanese Hayabusa 2 probe has detected its target, asteroid Ryugu.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on tuyo, a Filipino comfort food combining dried fish with chocolate-flavoured rice porridge.
  • Peter Rukavina reports on an entertaining-sounding club meeting in Charlottetown, of Island subscribers to The New Yorker.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how the new Great Magellan telescope will not have artificial spikes marring its field of vision.
  • Towleroad notes< that CNN's Don Lemon is aware of Trump's nickname for him, "Sour Lemon".
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Russia’s working-age population is set to decline regardless of recent demographic initiatives.