A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘dawn

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Anthrodendum reviews the book Fistula Politics, the latest from the field of medical anthropology.
  • Architectuul takes a look at post-war architecture in Germany, a country where the devastation of the war left clean slates for ambitious new designers and architects.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at newly discovered Kuiper Belt object 2008 VG 18.
  • Laura Agustín at Border Thinking takes a look at the figure of the migrant sex worker.
  • Centauri Dreams features an essay by Al Jackson celebrating the Apollo 8 moon mission.
  • D-Brief notes how physicists manufactured a quark soup in a collider to study the early universe.
  • Dangerous Minds shares some photos of a young David Bowie.
  • Angelique Harris at the Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at what the social sciences have to say about sexuality and dating among millennial Americans.
  • Gizmodo notes the odd apparent smoothness of Ultima Thule, target of a very close flyby by New Horizons on New Year’s Day.
  • Hornet Stories notes the censorship-challenging art by Slava Mogutin available from the Tom of Finland store.
  • Imageo shares orbital imagery of the eruption of Anak Krakatau in Indonesia, trigger of a devastating volcanic tsunami.
  • Nick Stewart at The Island Review writes beautifully about his experience crossing the Irish Sea on a ferry, from Liverpool to Belfast.
  • Lyman Stone at In A State of Migration shares the story, with photos, of his recent whirlwind trip to Vietnam.
  • JSTOR Daily considers whether or not fan fiction might be a useful tool to promote student literacy.
  • Language Hat notes a contentious reconstruction of the sound system of obscure but fascinating Tocharian, an extinct Indo-European language from modern XInjiang.
  • Dan Nexon at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the irreversible damage being caused by the Trump Administration to the United States’ foreign policy.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a paper suggesting users of Facebook would need a payment of at least one thousand dollars to abandon Facebook.
  • Lisa Nandy at the NYR Daily argues that the citizens of the United Kingdom need desperately to engage with Brexit, to take back control, in order to escape catastrophic consequences from ill-thought policies.
  • Marc Rayman at the Planetary Society Blog celebrates the life and achievements of the Dawn probe.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that so many Venezuelans are fleeing their country because food is literally unavailable, what with a collapsing agricultural sector.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog breaks down polling of nostalgia for the Soviet Union among Russians.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that simply finding oxygen in the atmosphere of an exoplanet is not by itself proof of life.
  • Ilya Somin at the Volokh Conspiracy reports on how the United States is making progress towards ending exclusionary zoning.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi shares an interview with the lawyer of Santa Claus.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on a fascinating paper, examining how some Russian immigrants in Germany use Udmurt as a family language.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at the lives of two notable members of the Swiss diaspora in Paris’ Montmartre.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Centauri Dreams considers, in the light of potential climate change extinction, the definitions of habitable exoplanets. Do we assume life to be too flexible?
  • D-Brief notes that the Dawn probe found evidence of organic compounds, amorphous carbon, on the surface of Ceres.
  • Lauren Madden at the Everyday Sociology Blog urges people to resist the impulse to misclassify the causes of mass shootings as senseless randomness.
  • Hornet Stories takes a look at Jobriath, the man who for a brief time in the mid-1970s was an out queer rock god, on what would have been his birthday.
  • Imageo notes that anthropogenic climate change risks plunging the global climate back to the heat and high sea levels of 50 million years ago, to the Eocene.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how the fairy tale stereotype of the passive female character was created by moral reformers following the Protestant Reformation.
  • Language Hat notes the Ao language, created by utopian early 20th century dreamers from Lithuania’s Jewish community as a universal method of communication.
  • Mark Liberman at Language Log notes the emergence and evolution of the word “biomarker” over the past half-century.
  • Simon Balto at Lawyers, Guns and Money writes about a frightening encounter on a night out with his partner with an aggressive person who kept calling him a “snowflake”. What does this, the embrace of this word as a supposed critique, say about racism and conservatism in the United States now?
  • The LRB Blog notes the prosecution of the Stansted 15 for blocking a deportation of refugees on terrorism. What does this say about the administration of justice and borders in the United Kingdom now?
  • Marginal Revolution notes that, in China, scientists convicted of fraud will face serious hits to their social credit ratings.
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at the “toxic femininity” of women on the American far right.
  • Roads and Kingdoms looks at the struggle of Mayan peoples in Guatemala to secure their land claims in the face of commercial agriculture.
  • Daniel Little at Understanding Society takes a look at how government enacts policy, not doing so as a unified whole at all.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the deep hostility of Lukashenko in Belarus to any talk of deep integration with Russia, something he sees as tantamount to Belarus’ annexation into Russia.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at the remarkable steel-banded sculpture of Fernando Suárez Reguera, and of sculptors like him.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • D-Brief notes that, with the Dawn probe unresponsive, its mission to Vesta and Ceres is now over.
  • The Dragon’s Tales reports that NASA is seeking commercial partners to deliver cargo to the proposed Gateway station.
  • JSTOR Daily looks back to a time where chestnuts were a staple food in Appalachia.
  • Language Log takes a look at prehistoric words in Eurasia for honey, in Indo-European and Old Sinitic.
  • Joy Katz at the LRB Blog writes about her lived experience of the conventional Pittsburgh neighbourhood of Squirrel Hill, a perhaps unlikely scene of tragedy.
  • The Map Room Blog links to an interactive map showing the Québec election results.
  • Marginal Revolution links to that New York Magazine article about young people who do not vote to start a discussion.
  • Roads and Kingdoms looks at the real dangers faced by Venezuelan refugees in the northern Brazilian state of Roraima, at the start of the era of Bolsonaro.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that changes to the Russian census allowing people to identify with multiple ethnicities could lead to a sharp shrinking in the numbers of minority nationalities.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomy shares an image of Hyperion, a proto-supercluster of galaxies literally jawdropping in scope.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly asks an interesting question: Who is your rock, your support? Who is your gravel?
  • Centauri Dreams notes a new paper suggesting a way to determine the size of undetected planets from the sorts of dust that they create.
  • Crooked Timber notes the obvious, that neither China nor the United States would win in a war in the South China Sea.
  • D-Brief ,a href=”http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/d-brief/2018/10/16/ganymede-moon-jupiter-world-tectonic-faults/”>notes that Ganymede, the largest moon of Jupiter and in the solar system, has tectonic faults in its icy crust.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that Russia is interested in cooperating with India in space travel.
  • David Finger at The Finger Post reports on his search for a Philly cheese steak sandwich in Philadelphia.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing considers the way in which modern social networking creates a totalitarianism, enlisting people through games into supporting its edifice.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Thailand is preparing to legalize civil unions for same-sex couples.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the 19th century heyday of “mummy brown”, a paint pigment used by artists made of ground-up Egyptian mummies.
  • Language Log notes that the expression “add oil”, originally from Chinese slang, is now in the OED.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how the lies of Facebook about the popularity on online video dealt a terrible blow to journalism.
  • Lingua Franca examines how the word “smarmy” came about and spread.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the exceptional generosity of actor Chow Yun Fat, who is giving away his vast estate.
  • Hugh Eakin at the NYR Daily takes a look at the role of the United States in mounting repression in Saudi Arabia, symbolized by the Khashoggi killing.
  • Marc Rayman at the Planetary Society Blog looks at the achievements of the Dawn probe, at Ceres and Vesta and the points in between, on this its 11th anniversary.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares a photo essay looking at the difficult treks of the Rohingya as they are forced to scavenge firewood from a local forest.
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at the homoerotic photography of James Critchley.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at what it was likely, in the early universe, when starlight became visible for the first time.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps debunks a map purporting to show post-Fukushima contamination of the entire Pacific, and has it with false and discouraging apocalyptic maps generally.
  • Window on Eurasia takes a look at the deep divide between the Russian and Ukrainian nations.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomy notes the wonders being witnessed by the Dawn probe in orbit of Ceres.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the potential of effectively immortal interstellar probes.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of some genetic origins of loneliness.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog notes the connections and potential conflicts between concepts of race and the British royal family.
  • Far Outliers shares the first part of the summary of an article examining contact between African and Japanese mercenaries in early modern Asia.
  • Gizmodo wonders if Uranus’ large axial tilt can be explained by some sort of massive collision.
  • Hornet Stories likes the way that Pose, a show set in queer communities in New York City in the 1980s, deals with HIV.
  • In the aftermath of the tumult regarding the New York Times’ coverage of Batman and Catwoman, io9 offers the paper some tips on covering pop culture.
  • JSTOR Daily shares a paper noting how and why, in belle époque Chicago, immigrant communities often sponsored Fourth of July celebrations.
  • Language Hat deals with the convention of many writers in English to italicize foreign words. Why do this, again?
  • Jonathan Freedland at the NYR Daily considers the import of the Fourth of July for the United States in 2018.
  • Science and Food looks at liquid nitrogen gastronomy.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers if the universe might be headed for a big rip.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Centauri Dreams notes evidence that pitted terrain, as found on Ceres and Vesta, indicates subsurface ice.
  • Dead Things links to evidence suggesting insomnia and poor sleep are not disorders, but rather evolutionary inheritances that were useful in the past.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the critical human role in the ongoing sixth extinction.
  • Language Hat links to speculation that the Afroasiatic language family has its origins in the Natufian Levant.
  • The LRB Blog reports on a fascinating French show about espionage, Le Bureau des légendes.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw reports on an important speech by Malcolm Turnbull on politics and Australia’s Liberal Party.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares Marc Rayman’s report on the latest discoveries of Dawn at Ceres.
  • Spacing’ Sean Ruthven has a review of a beautiful book on the Sea Ranch, a northern California estate.
  • Back in May, Septembre Anderson argued at Torontoist that rather than embracing diversity, Canadian media was more willing to wither.
  • Window on Eurasia shares an argument suggesting Baltic Russians would not follow the Donbas into revolt because the Baltics are much better off economically.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Centauri Dreams looks at the discoveries of Dawn of Ceres.
  • Crooked Timber remembers anthropologist Benedict Anderson.
  • The Dragon’s Tales reports on the intensification of Russia’s war in Syria.
  • Discover‘s The Extremophiles blogs about the DNA of viruses in Yellowstone’s acidic hot springs.
  • Joe. My. God. notes Ricky Martin’s launching of a LGBT group in support of Hillary Clinton.
  • Language Hat notes the discovery of the earliest traces of an alphabet.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money writes about Lakota leader Red Cloud.
  • The New APPS Blog considers, after Foucault, if ancient Greek philosophy was Western.
  • Transit Toronto notes the resumption of subway service after midnight north of Eglinton.
  • Towleroad notes the importance of the B-52s.
  • Why I Love Toronto profiles an interesting cat gift shop.
  • Window on Eurasia notes Russia’s pharmaceutical weaknesses, suggests Russia is using Syria to undermine Europe mainly, and looks at Tatarstan’s issues with Russia’s constitutional practices.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly describes what it takes to be a professional writer.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper considering dust in atmospheres.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes the study of a medieval Korean star catalogue.
  • Language Hat notes a program to translate Mexican writers who write in indigenous languages.
  • Steve Munro offers advice on what to do about Smarttrack.
  • Marginal Revolution refers readers to Gary Kasparov’s new book on politics, criticizing Putin and much else.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares the latest data from Dawn at Ceres.
  • Torontoist has a beautiful picture of the Prince Edward Viaduct.
  • Towleroad notes a referendum on same-sex marriage in Slovenia.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • blogTO notes that you can now LARP at Casa Loma.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the odd reddish marks on the surface of Saturn’s moon Tethys.
  • Crooked Timber takes issue with David Frum’s misrepresentation of an article on Mediterranean migration.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes the discovery of the aurora of a nearby brown dwarf.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes evidence of carbonation on the Martian surface and suggests the presence of anomalous amounts of mercury on Earth associated with mass extinctions.
  • Geocurrents maps the terrifying strength of California’s drought.
  • Language Hat notes that Cockney is disappearing from London.
  • Language Log notes coded word usage on the Chinese Internet.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper examining the effects of hunting male lions.
  • The Map Room links to new maps of Ceres and Pluto.
  • The Planetary Society Blog examines the Dawn probe’s mapping orbits of Ceres.
  • Progressive Download traces the migration of the aloe plants over time from Arabia.
  • Savage Minds notes how hacktivists are being treated as terrorists.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the Ukrainian war is leading to the spread of heavy weapons in Russia, looks at Russian opposition to a Crimean Tatar conference in Turkey, suggests that the West is letting Ukraine fight a limited war in Donbas, and looks at the falling Russian birthrate.

[LINK] “Ceres Resembles Saturn’s Icy Moons”

Universe Today’s Jason Major reports on how dwarf planet Ceres is starting to look like an outer-system ice world. More, including a map, at the site.

With craters 3.7 miles (6 km) deep and mountains rising about the same distance from its surface, Ceres bears a resemblance to some of Saturn’s frozen moons.

“The craters we find on Ceres, in terms of their depth and diameter, are very similar to what we see on Dione and Tethys, two icy satellites of Saturn that are about the same size and density as Ceres,” said Paul Schenk, Dawn science team member and a geologist at the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI) in Houston, TX. “The features are pretty consistent with an ice-rich crust.”

In addition to elevation mapping Ceres has also had some of its more prominent craters named. No longer just “bright spot crater” and “Spot 1,” these ancient impact scars now have official IAU monikers… from the Roman Occator to the Hawaiian Haulani to the Hopi Kerwan, craters on Ceres are named after agriculture-related gods and goddesses of mythologies from around the world.

Dawn is currently moving closer toward Ceres into its third mapping orbit. By mid-August it will be 900 miles (1448 km) above Ceres’ surface and will proceed with acquiring data from this lower altitude, three times closer than it has been previously.

At 584 miles (940 km) in diameter Ceres is about 40 percent the size of Pluto.

Written by Randy McDonald

July 29, 2015 at 10:26 pm