A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘democracy

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Centauri Dreams takes a look at the exciting early news on potentially habitable nearby exoplanet Ross 128 b.
  • The Crux notes that evidence has been found of Alzheimer-like illness in dolphins. Is this, as the scientists argue, a symptom of a syndrome shared between us, big-brained social species with long post-fertility lifespans?
  • D-Brief takes a look at the idea of contemporary life on Mars hiding away in the icy regolith near the surface.
  • Far Outliers notes one argument that Germany lost the Second World War because of the poor quality of its leaders.
  • Gizmodo notes the incredibly bright event PS1-10adi, two and a half billion light-years away. What is it? No one knows …
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money celebrates the end of the Mugabe dictatorship in Zimbabwe.
  • The Map Room Blog links to some fascinating detailed maps of the outcome of the Australian mail-in vote on marriage equality.
  • Roads and Kingdoms visits rural Mexico after the recent quake.
  • Cheri Lucas Rowlands shares some beautiful photos of fantastical Barcelona.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the insights provided by Pluto’s mysterious cool atmosphere, with its cooling haze, has implications for Earth at a time of global warming.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Russia is not going to allow even Tatarstan to include the Tatar language as a mandatory school subject.
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[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Dangerous Minds shares some of the exotic space music of composer Pauline Anna Strom.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining the effect of in-system super-Earth on asteroid impacts upon terrestrial planets.
  • Hornet Stories, for ones, notes that Cards Against Humanity has bought up a stretch along the US-Mexican border to prevent the construction of a border wall.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reminds people–sad that it has to be done–that, even in Trump outposts like Johnstown in Pennsylvania where racism has replaced reason among too many, there still are good things in this and other like communities.
  • The LRB Blog considers the plight of British-Iranian Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, whose plight in Iranian custody has been worsened by her government. What can be done for her?
  • Marginal Revolution notes how, in the early 20th century as in the early 21st century, substantial immigration to the US became politically controversial despite its benefits.
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at the art of Tove Jansson, beyond the Moomins.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer takes a look at the slow emergence of Canadian citizenship distinct from the British over the 20th century.
  • Roads and Kingdoms takes</u. a look at the grape-crashing of the vineyards of Oliver, British Columbia.
  • Peter Rukavina describes the origin of the theme music of CBC classic show The Friendly Giant in the 18th century English folk tune “Early One Morning.”
  • Seriously Science notes that oysters can apparently hear sound.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that the autonomy enjoyed by Puerto Rico was one source of inspiration for the nationalists of Tatarstan in the early 1990s.

[NEWS] Three clashes of ideologies: Sagan on religion and science, peace poppy, Russia and the West

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  • Christopher Douglas writes at The Conversation about how the Carl Sagan novel Contact explores Sagan’s own perspective on the relationship between religion and science.
  • I’m not at all sure I agree with the argument of Rob Breakenridge that the “peace poppy”, the white poppy preferred by some anti-war protesters, tarnishes Remembrance Day. Global News has the report
  • Leonid Bershidsky argues that the involvement of Putin’s Russia in Western politics is best understood as a strategy to undermine the credibility of these institutions and countries. (Continental Europe is doing better than the US and UK.) Bloomberg has it.

Written by Randy McDonald

November 13, 2017 at 4:15 pm

[URBAN NOTE] Edmonton, Dartmouth, Montréal and Valérie Plante, Trump and the Bills

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  • Global News notes a celebration of Harbin Gate, in Edmonton, a Chinese monument that may not be reassembled.
  • Dartmouth, it’s being said, is becoming the Brooklyn of Halifax. Global News reports.
  • It turns out that Donald Trump was involved in the push to keep the Buffalo Bills from moving to Toronto. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Chantal Hébert places the election of Valérie Plante as mayor of Montréal in the context of a backlash against elites.
  • Toula Drimonis at the National Observer places the election of Valérie Plante in the context of her strengths as a believable politician.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Anthrodendum takes an extended look at sexual harassment in anthropology, drawing from #metoo.
  • Crooked Timber considers the so-called Amazon-Facebook-Google “trinet” set to take over from the free Internet.
  • Dead Things considers if the Americas could have been populated by early migration down the coast, the “kelp route”.
  • Samuel Hatmaker’s Lego portrait of RuPaul is profiled in Hornet Stories.
  • Language Hat considers an untranslatable poem of Pasternak.
  • Language Log notes how Manafort’s legal team confused “Cyprus” with “cypress”.
  • Robert Farley of Lawyers, Guns and Money shares an interview of his with the Indian consul-general in Houston on the nature of the latter’s work.
  • Tyler Cowen of Marginal Revolution argues blaming Facebook for electoral manipulation overlooks the responsibility of individual voters.
  • The NYR Daily notes that the Kurds have paid the price for Trump’s dealings with Iran.
  • Roads and Kingdoms explores the surprisingly living Central Cemetery of Vienna.
  • Drew Rowsome explores the literature of horror writer Robert Sherman.
  • Towleroad notes BPM, the Oscar-contending French film about the AIDS crisis in that country.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the oddness of a pledge by China to fight illegal migration by Chinese into Russia.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlyn Kelly talks about the rejuvenating effects of “forest bathing”. I quite agree, myself.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the idea of Project Blue, a dedicated astronomy satellite to look for exoplanets at Alpha Centauri.
  • D-Brief notes that astrophysicists have verified an eclipse described in the Bible circa 1207 BCE.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to another KIC 8462852 study, finding its dimming is best explained by circumstellar debris.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog notes the importance of being careful with the use of numbers.
  • Far Outliers explores how Singapore managed to position itself as a safe destination for tourists visiting Asia.
  • Language Hat links to a beautiful passage from Kim Stanley Robinson’s Aurora on the messiness of language.
  • Language Log takes a look at the phenomenon of headlessness in the propaganda of North Korea.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the sad short life of Stanwix Melville.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares multiple images, with multiple perspectives, of Giordano Bruno crater on the Moon.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw finds the use of Section 44 of the Australian Constitution to disqualify politicians as dual nationals ridiculous.
  • Cheri Lucas Rowlands shares some beautiful photos of Saint-Tropez.
  • Arnold Zwicky meditates on language, moving from the strange names of the parts of flowers to the X-Men.

[URBAN NOTE] Six Toronto links: tourism, winter, HQ2, public art, wards, streets

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  • Shawn Micallef talks about where he, and other people in Toronto, takes visitors to this city.
  • Toronto is opening an additional five respite centres for the homeless. The Toronto Star reports.
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  • Royson James suggests the confident bid of Toronto for the Amazon HQ2 shows the maturity of the city.
  • A new report by OACD and the University of Toronto looks at ways Toronto can improve its public art scene. Metro Toronto reports.
  • The ward boundaries of Toronto remain unclear as the election approaches. Torontoist reports.
  • blogTO reports on exciting plans to remake the streets of Toronto for a more populous future.