A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘democracy

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Hornet Stories reports that there is now an out K-Pop star, the new Holland.
  • Russell Arben Fox at In Media Res calls for the defeat of the disastrous Trump through crushing electoral defeats.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the profound impact, social and otherwise, that Richardson’s pioneering novel Pamela had on 18th century Europe.
  • Language Log notes the declining use of the definite article in Agatha Christie and Ross Macdonald.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the need for a proper understanding of the political thought of Martin Luther King.
  • The NYR Daily looks at an exhibition of the portraits of Jean-HonorĂ© Fragonard.
  • Drew Rowsome treats Get Out as a documentary, as much as a compelling horror movie about race relations.
  • Window on Eurasia worries about the effective of private military groups, if allowed to become bigger, on Russian foreign policy. Question: what has their impact been on American foreign policy?
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[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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‘Nathan Smith at Apostrophen points out that claiming to disagree with homosexuality while respecting gay people is nonsensical. https://apostrophen.wordpress.com/2018/01/11/queer-isnt-an-opinion/

Centauri Dreams notes the innovative cheap PicSat satellite, currently monitoring Beta Pictoris with its known exoplanet. https://www.centauri-dreams.org/?p=39109

Corey Robin at Crooked Timber argues that Trump is shaky, weaker than American democracy. (Not that that is going that well, mind.) http://crookedtimber.org/2018/01/13/trumps-power-is-shakier-than-american-democracy/

The Crux points out the sentient, including emotions, of any number of animal species. http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/crux/2018/01/11/animals-feelings-sentient/

Far Outliers notes some German commanders in western Europe who quickly surrendered to the Allies in the Second World War, and why they did that. http://faroutliers.blogspot.com/2018/01/quick-german-surrenders-in-west.html

Hornet Stories notes how a court decision dealing with a Romanian man and his American husband could lead to European Union-wide recognition of same-sex marriage. https://hornetapp.com/stories/european-union-gay-marriage/

JSTOR Daily notes how air pollution is a human rights issue. https://daily.jstor.org/why-air-pollution-is-a-socioeconomic-issue/

Language Hat notes how the use of the apostrophe in the newly Latin script-using Kazakh language is controversial. http://languagehat.com/apostrophe-catastrophe-in-kazakhstan/

Geoffrey Pullim at Lingua Franca shares a passage from Muriel Spark’s fiction depicting students’ reactions to learning foreign languages. https://www.chronicle.com/blogs/linguafranca/2018/01/11/a-foreign-way-which-never-really-caught-on

The LRB Blog tells the story of Omid, an Iranian who managed to smuggle himself from his home country to a precarious life in the United Kingdom. https://www.lrb.co.uk/blog/2018/01/15/behzad-yaghmaian/omids-journey/

The Map Room Blog shares a newly-updated map of “Trumpworld” the world as seen by Donald Trump. http://www.maproomblog.com/2018/01/trumpworld/

Marginal Revolution notes research indicating that dolphins have a grasp on economics, and what this indicates about their sentience. http://marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2018/01/dolphin-capital-theory.html

The Planetary Society Blog notes how the upcoming Europa Clipper probe will be able to analyze Europa’s oceans without encountering plumes of water. http://www.planetary.org/blogs/jason-davis/2018/20180111-no-plumes-no-problem.html

The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer suggests that, with the declining import of informal rules in American politics, a future Democratic-majority Congress might be able to sneak through statehood for Puerto Rico and Washington D.C. http://noelmaurer.typepad.com/aab/2018/01/breaking-norms-by-adding-states.html

Rocky Planet reports on the disastrous mudflows that have hit southern California after the fires. http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/rockyplanet/2018/01/12/mudflows-devastate-parts-of-southern-california/

Drew Rowsome praises new horror from Matt Ruff. http://drewrowsome.blogspot.com/2018/01/lovecraft-country-matt-ruffs-multi.html

Peter Rukavina talks about his positive experiences with a walk-in mental health clinic on the Island. https://ruk.ca/content/i-went-mental-health-walk-clinic-and-so-can-you

Strange Company talks about the bizarre 1982 disappearance of one Donald Kemp. Did he even die? http://strangeco.blogspot.com/2018/01/the-strange-exit-of-donald-kemp.html

Towleroad notes that Peter Thiel is trying to buy Gawker, perhaps to destroy its archives. http://www.towleroad.com/2018/01/gawker-peter-thiel/

[URBAN NOTE] Four Toronto links: McMichael, Reblink at the AGO, shelters, amalgamation

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  • This CBC article describing the goals of the new head of the McMichael gallery, north of Toronto, is intriguing. I have to get up there!
  • The ReBlink exhibit at the Art Gallery of Ontario, using smartphone technology to reimagine select painings, is an interesting idea. I’m not sure about the execution, but props for the idea. CBC reports.
  • The City of Toronto’s efforts at opening shelters against the cold for the homeless of the city have been less than impressive. Torontoist features a critique.
  • At Torontoist, Michael Lapointe takes a look at the city of Toronto twenty years after amalgamation. Was it worth it? Can the city handle its challenges?

[NEWS] Four geopolitics links: democracy, Trump and China, India and Pakistan, western Balkans

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  • The suggestion by David Moscrop, at MacLean’s, that between the rise of authoritarian China and the Trump ascendancy in the US, liberal democracy may face particular peril this year seems worryingly plausible.
  • Evan Osnos at The New Yorker looks at how the savvy Chinese government is taking advantage of Trump’s incapacities.
  • This DefenseOne essay arguing that India is facing a point where it is unable to defeat Pakistan in conventional battle is worth noting.
  • This B92 essay arguing that the European Union should make special provisions for the western Balkans to avoid their protracted decay outside of the Union convinces me, at least.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Anthro{dendum] considers drifting on roads as an indicator of social dynamism, of creative reuse of road infrastructures by the young.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares photos of the Christmas Tree Cluster, a portion of NGC 2264.
  • Centauri Dreams notes how the strange polar orbit of GJ 436b indicates the presence of a neighbouring exoplanet so far not detected directly.
  • Crooked Timber considers the import of perhaps racist codings in children’s literature.
  • D-Brief examines how NASA is trying to quietly break the sound barrier.
  • Bruce Dorminey suggests building a Mars-orbit space station makes sense for us as our next major move in space.
  • Hornet Stories shares the story of queer male Lebanese belly dancer Moe Khansa and his art.
  • Language Hat notes how one student made substantial progress of decoding the ancient khipus, knotted string records, of the Incan civilization.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money makes the obvious point that opioids actually do help people manage chronic pain effectively, that they have legitimate uses.
  • Allan Metcalf at Lingua Franca talks about some of the peculiarities of English as spoken in Utah.
  • Noah Smith at Noahpinion argues the disappearance of the positive impact of college on the wages who drop out before completing their program shows the importance of higher education as a generator of human capital, not as a simple sort of signal.
  • The NYR Daily looks at some particularly egregious instances of gerrymandering in the United States.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer examines the origins of street violence as a political force in modern Argentina.
  • Roads and Kingdoms looks at the Seoul neighbourhood of Haebangchon, “Little Pyongyang,” a district once populated by North Korean and Vietnamese refugees now becoming a cosmopolitan district for people from around the world.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the origins of the atoms of our body in stellar catastrophes detectable from across the universe.
  • Strange Company notes the case of Catherine Packard, reported dead in 1929 but then found alive. Whose body wasit?
  • Towleroad reports a study suggesting same-sex relationships tend to be more satisfying for their participants than opposite-sex relationships are for theirs.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how a Russian Orthodox group is joining the fight against Tatarstan’s autonomy.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Architetuul considers the architectural potential offered by temporary constructions.
  • Centauri Dreams examines how the latest artificial intelligence routines were used to pick up the faint signal of Kepler-90i.
  • JSTOR Daily examines the sign language used by the deaf servants popular at the Ottoman imperial court.
  • Gizmodo notes that preliminary studies of ‘Oumuamua suggest that body is not a technological artifact.
  • Hornet Stories notes the bizarre friendship of Floyd Mayweather with Chechnya’s Ramzan Kadyrov.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the negative effects of NAFTA and globalization on the food eaten by Mexicans.
  • Geoffrey Pullum at Lingua Franca notes the fine line between dialectal differences and language errors.
  • The LRB Blog takes a quick look at corruption in the Russian bid for the World Cup in 2018.
  • The NYR Daily looks at Russian influence behind the Brexit referendum, noting the long-term need of the American and British democracies to adapt.
  • Jake Shears talks with Towleroad about the role that the city of New Orleans has been playing in his life and his creative work.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares beautiful images of nebula Sharpless 2-29, brilliant and beautiful from the heart of our galaxy.
  • Centauri Dreams notes how New Horizons is maneuvering for its rendezvous with KBO MU69 on 1 January 2019.
  • Daily JSTOR notes how Indian schools were at once vehicles for the assimilation of American indigenous peoples and also sites for potential resistance.
  • Dangerous Minds shares the vintage Vampirella art of Enrique Torres-Prat.
  • From Tumblr, Explain It Like I’m Not From Lawrence looks at a very unusual tower in the downtown of that Kansas community.
  • Hornet Stories notes that PrEP is becoming available in Brazil, but only for a small subset of potential users.
  • Imageo notes a recent American study observing that the degree of Arctic heating is in at least two millennia.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Bermuda has repealed marriage equality. I can’t help but think this will not help the island’s tourism.
  • Language Hat links to a new encyclopedia article examining the origins of the Japanese language. I’m surprised the article suggests there are no verifiable links to Korean, Paekche aside.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money has an after-action report on the Alabama senate election. I agree with most of the conclusions–certainly it shows a need to contest every election!
  • Allan Metcalf at Lingua Franca quite likes the term “fake news” for its specific power, claiming it as his word of 2017.
  • The NYR Daily reflects on an exhibition of the powerful works of Modigliani.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on some infrared images taken by Juno of Jupiter and volcanic Io.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares 21 pieces of advice for people interested in visiting Iran as tourists.
  • Towleroad’s list of the Top 10 albums of 2017 is worth paying attention to.
  • If this Window on Eurasia report is correct and HIV seroprevalence in Russia is twice the proportion officially claimed, 1.5% of the population …