A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘Demographics

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • D-Brief notes that the opioid epidemic seems to be hitting baby boomers and millennials worst, of all major American demographics.
  • Hornet Stories shares one timetable for new DC films following Justice League.
  • Joe. My. God. notes a case brought by a Romanian before the European Court of Justice regarding citizenship rights for his American spouse. This could have broad implications for the recognition of same-sex couples across the EU, not just its member-states.
  • Language Hat reports on a journalist’s search for a village in India where Sanskrit, ancient liturgical language of Hinduism, remains the vernacular.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a review of an intriuging new book, Nowherelands, looking at ephemeral countries in the 1840-1975 era.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the textile art of Anni Albers.
  • The Planetary Society Blog explores the navigational skills of the Polynesians, and their reflection in Moana.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on the widespread jubilation in Zimbabwe following the overthrow of Mugabe.
  • Rocky Planet notes that Öræfajökull, the largest volcano in Iceland if a hidden one, has been showing worrying signs of potential eruption.
  • Drew Rowsome reports on House Guests, an art installation that has taken over an entire house at Dundas and Ossington.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the story of how the quantum property of spin was discovered.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests new Russian policies largely excluding non-Russian languages from education are causing significant problems, even ethnic conflict.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers music as a trigger of emotional memory, generally and in his own life.
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[NEWS] Three notes about genetics and history and the future: Georgia, Beothuk, Amish

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  • Archeological work has revealed evidence of vineyards in the Republic of Georgia dating back eight thousand years. National Geographic reports.
  • This extended article looks at the ways in which modern genetics are revealing the ancient history of the indigenous peoples of the Americas, using the Beothuk as an example. The Guardian has it.
  • Joe O’Connor describes how an obscure mutation among the Amish governing blood clotting may offer guides for people interested in extending human longevity, over at the National Post.

[NEWS] Five links about population in small centres: education, Ontario, Atlantic Canada

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  • Noah Smith at Bloomberg notes that universities, and other centres of higher education, can play a critical role in keeping small centres alive, in the US and elsewhere.
  • Michelle McQuigge notes that the northern Ontario town of Smooth Rock Falls has seen success attracting potential new residents with sales of land for cheap, for the Canadian Press.
  • Jessica Leeder tells the sad story about how the politics of a community radio station in Newfoundland’s Bell Island tore the community apart, over at The Globe and Mail.
  • CBC notes that the influx of Syrian refugees to Nova Scotia has reversed a trend of population decline. Will it last? More here.
  • The government of Prince Edward Island has an ambitious strategy to boost the Island’s population, through immigration, to 160 thousand by 2022. More here.

[ISL] Five islands links: Bahamas, Puerto Rico, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, Fiji

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  • I found, from somewhere in the blogosphere, a 1982 essay by June Jordan, “Report from the Bahamas.” How can solidarity and identity be established across great distances, geographic and otherwise, in a globalized world?
  • This analysis by Lyman Stone of the impact of Hurricane Maria on the already dire demographics of Puerto Rico is worth reading. Population decline will be at least as sharp as in Ireland and Corsica.
  • Will making Cape Breton a province separate from Nova Scotia, as suggested by independent senator Dan Christmas, do anything to stop the island’s sharp decline? The Cape Breton Post reports.
  • Climate change and sea level rise may effectively make mainland Nova Scotia an island, cutting the dike-protected roads on the Isthmus of Chignecto. VICE reports.
  • Fiji is preparing for an influx of climate change refugees from other, lower-lying and poorer, island nations in the Pacific. Bloomberg reports.

[URBAN NOTE] Four Toronto notes: elections, Parkdale, poverty, and three Torontos

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  • John Lorinc at Spacing takes a look at how demographic change, including economic polarization, may influence the 2018 municipal elections in Toronto.
  • Laurie Monsebraaten reports on the growing income polarization of different neighbourhoods and communities in Toronto, over at the Toronto Star.
  • Liam Barrington-Bush discusses, at NOW Toronto, the possibility of a massive new development at King and Dufferin being the tipping point for the gentrification of wider Parkdale.
  • Joe Mihevc shares with NOW Toronto some of his strategies for fighting poverty in Toronto.

Written by Randy McDonald

November 19, 2017 at 6:15 pm

[META] Six new blogs on the blogroll

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I will be doing the hard work of installing these six blogs on my blogroll later this weekend. For now, suffice it to say that these six blogs, still-extant islands in a blogosphere in a state of transformation, are going to be the last I’ll be adding for some time. It can be hard to keep up with them all.

  • Daily JSTOR is the famed scholarly archive’s blog. This 1 November post, timed for Nanowrimo, sharing some inspiring quotes from writers about writing, is fun.
  • The blog by Lyman Stone, In a State of Migration, has great analyses of demographic issues in the United States and wider world. This recent post, looking at what it would take to–as the alt-right would wish–“make America white” and the enormous costs of this goal, is worth noting.
  • Information is Beautiful, by famed data journalist David McCandless has all sorts of fantastic infographics. I recommend this one, looking at the United Kingdom’s options re: Brexit.
  • The Chronicle of Higher Education’s blog Lingua Franca takes a look at language and writing. This recent post, analyzing the complexities and challenges of George Orwell’s thought on freedom of expression, is very good.
  • Noahpinion is the blog of Bloomberg writer Noah Smith. I quite liked this older essay, one noting that cyberpunk’s writers seem to have gotten the future, unlike other writers in other SF subgenres. Does rapid change lead to bad predictions?
  • Salmagundi is a blog by an anonymous gay Kentucky writer touching on the subjects of his life and more. The most recent post is this link to an essay by Bruce Snider, talking about the lack of rural gay poets.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Dangerous Minds shares some of the exotic space music of composer Pauline Anna Strom.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining the effect of in-system super-Earth on asteroid impacts upon terrestrial planets.
  • Hornet Stories, for ones, notes that Cards Against Humanity has bought up a stretch along the US-Mexican border to prevent the construction of a border wall.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reminds people–sad that it has to be done–that, even in Trump outposts like Johnstown in Pennsylvania where racism has replaced reason among too many, there still are good things in this and other like communities.
  • The LRB Blog considers the plight of British-Iranian Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, whose plight in Iranian custody has been worsened by her government. What can be done for her?
  • Marginal Revolution notes how, in the early 20th century as in the early 21st century, substantial immigration to the US became politically controversial despite its benefits.
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at the art of Tove Jansson, beyond the Moomins.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer takes a look at the slow emergence of Canadian citizenship distinct from the British over the 20th century.
  • Roads and Kingdoms takes</u. a look at the grape-crashing of the vineyards of Oliver, British Columbia.
  • Peter Rukavina describes the origin of the theme music of CBC classic show The Friendly Giant in the 18th century English folk tune “Early One Morning.”
  • Seriously Science notes that oysters can apparently hear sound.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that the autonomy enjoyed by Puerto Rico was one source of inspiration for the nationalists of Tatarstan in the early 1990s.