A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘disasters

[URBAN NOTE] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait considers the possibility that our model for the evolution of galaxies might be partially disproven by Big Data.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly reports how she did her latest article for the New York Times.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the beginning of a search for habitable-zone planets around Alpha Centauri A and B.
  • The Crux looks at how the skull trophies of the ancient Maya help explain civilizational collapse.
  • D-Brief notes new evidence suggesting that our humble, seemingly stable Sun can produce superflares.
  • Dead Things reports on the latest informed speculation about the sense of smell of Tyrannosaurus Rex.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares the NASA report on its progress towards the Lunar Gateway station.
  • Gizmodo looks at the growing number of China’s beautiful, deadly, blooms of bioluminescent algae.
  • io9 reports that Stjepan Sejic has a new series with DC, exploring the inner life of Harley Quinn.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at an example of a feminist musical, the Chantal Akerman The Eighties.
  • Language Hat links to a review of a dystopian novel by Yoko Tawada, The Emissary, imagining a future Japan where the learning of foreign languages is banned.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money reiterates that history, and the writing of history, is an actual profession with skills and procedures writers in the field need to know.
  • Liam Shaw writes at the LRB Blog about how people in London, late in the Second World War, coped with the terrifying attacks of V2 rockets.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a new book, Wayfinding, about the neuroscience of navigation.
  • Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution reviews a Robert Zubrin book advocating the colonization of space and finds himself unconvinced.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at the ancient comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko explored by the ESA Rosetta probe.
  • Roads and Kingdoms provides tips for visitors to the Paraguay capital of Asuncion.
  • Peter Rukavina reports that, on the day the new PEI legislature came in, 105% of Island electricity came from windpower.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel argues that, in searching for life, we should not look for exoplanets very like Earth.
  • Strange Company shares another weekend collection of diverse links.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little shares the views of Margaret Gilbert on social facts.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Kadyrov might dream of a broad Greater Chechnya, achieved at the expense of neighbouring republics.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers some superhero identity crises, of Superman and of others.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait takes a look at an evocative corner of the Pelican Nebula.
  • Centauri Dreams considers if a supernova might have kickstarted hominid evolution by triggering wildfires.
  • D-Brief looks at how scientists examined binary asteroid 1999 KW4 during its flyby on May 25th.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on the development of the radical abolitionism of William Blake.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at centrism as not neutrality but rather as an ideology of its own.
  • Marginal Revolution suggests that legal emigration is more common from right-wing dictatorships than from left-wing ones. Is this actually the case?
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that an image passed off as a hole in the universe a billion light-years wide is actually a photo of nebula Barnard 68.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that Ukraine, rather than trying to position itself as a bridge between West and East, should simply try to join the West without equivocations.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a Zippy cartoon and moves on to explore the wider world from it.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Montréal links: Royalmount, flooding, bike paths, schools, Piknic Electronik

  • The city of Montréal continues to oppose the controversial Royalmount project. Global News reports?
  • Will communities in the flood-prone West Island get protective dikes? CBC reports.
  • Are the bike paths of Montréal getting sufficient investment? CTV News reports.
  • French-language schools in booming north-end Montréal are facing overcrowding. CBC reports.
  • CultMTL takes a look at what is up this year for Piknik Electronik on Ile Sainte-Hélène.

[URBAN NOTE] Ten links on cities, in all their dimensions

  • The Conversation notes how Canadian cities need new revenue sources as their economies evolve.
  • Can Canada learn from a New Jersey trying to move homes and residents out of flood-prone areas? CBC reports.
  • CityLab looks at how St. Louis is finally removing the artificial concrete barriers blocking its streets and neighbourhoods.
  • The controversial “new towns” of the United Kingdom are the subject of this Guardian Cities feature.
  • Bloomberg looks at how second-tier cities in China like Wuhan are also competing for white-collar migrants.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how urban architecture can be made to work better.
  • CityLab looks at the extent to which Millennials in North America really do like cities, and why.
  • CityLab examines the various reasons why Americans have become less mobile than many before, from a love for their community to note being able to move.
  • This Guardian Cities article looking at how British cities have become dependent on alcohol sales and nightclubbing, despite the social toll, is disturbing.
  • Justin Fox at Bloomberg looks at how cities like Buffalo and Pittsburgh can thrive despite losing population.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait reports on a dwarf galaxy collision with galaxy NGC 1232, producing waves of X-rays.
  • The Toronto Library’s The Buzz highlights a collection of books on LGBTQ themes for Pride month.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at studies of the circumstellar disk of HD 163296.
  • D-Brief reports that plastic debris may have contributed to a die-off of puffins by the Bering Sea.
  • Bruce Dorminey shares an image of a rich star-forming region in Cepheus taken by the Spitzer telescope.
  • Imageo reports how smoke from wildfires in Canada have covered literally millions of square kilometres of North America in smoke.
  • io9 notes how, in the limited series Doomsday Clock, Doctor Manhattan has come to a new realization about Superman and the DC multiverse.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how Luddites are now fashionable again, with their critiques of technology.
  • Language Log reports on a unique whistled version of the Turkish language.
  • Lawyers Guns and Money takes a look its different writers’ production over its 15 years.
  • Emannuel Iduma writes at the NRY Daily about the young people, lives filled with promise, killed in the Biafran War.
  • Corey S. Powell at Out There has an interesting idea: What items of food do the different planets of the solar system resemble?
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks at the many stupidities of the new Trump tariffs against Mexico.
  • Peter Rukavina celebrates the 20th anniversary of his blog.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel reports on the exceptionally isolated galaxy MCG+01-02-015, in a void a hundred million light-years away from any other.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the changing politics and scholarship surrounding mass deaths in Soviet Kazakhstan in the 1930s. https://windowoneurasia2.blogspot.com/2019/05/debate-on-mass-deaths-in-kazakhstan.html
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at flowers coloured magenta in his California.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Kitchener-Waterloo, Bowmanville, Kingston, Laval, Québec City

  • Grand River Transit, in Kitchener-Waterloo, is running a contest giving a winner a chance to ride the first Ion train. Global News reports.
  • Can the eastern GTA city of Bowmanville get included in Metrolinx’s plans for GO Transit expansion? Global News reports.
  • Kingston, Ontario, is preparing for a new tourist season, capitalizing on its many museums and history sites. Global News reports.
  • Le Devoir reports a new REM train station in Laval might be in a flood risk area.
  • This year, Québec City is trying to balance the needs of tourists and residents in Vieux-Québec. CTV News reports.

[URBAN NOTE] Seven Toronto links: #DoorsOpenTO, Eglinton Crosstown, Lake Ontario, public art

  • Transit Toronto notes that both the Eglinton Crosstown yards and Lower Bay station were open this weekend past for Doors Open. I got to see both!
  • Urban Toronto looks at the newly revealed Eglinton Crosstown vehicles.
  • blogTO observes the rapid flooding faced not only by the Toronto Islands but by the waterfront generally.
  • blogTO reports on the exciting possibility of a ferry connecting Etobicoke, at Humber Bay Shores, to the downtown.
  • Building a linear park over the subway trench between Davisville and Eglinton stations in midtown Toronto is an idea that appeals to me. blogTO reports.
  • NOW Toronto reports on a slew of original coffee shops around Toronto, including a laundromat hybrid on Dufferin.
  • Urban Toronto celebrates the Ron Arad sculpture Safe Hands at One Bloor East.