A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘donald trump

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Dangerous Minds shares some of the exotic space music of composer Pauline Anna Strom.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining the effect of in-system super-Earth on asteroid impacts upon terrestrial planets.
  • Hornet Stories, for ones, notes that Cards Against Humanity has bought up a stretch along the US-Mexican border to prevent the construction of a border wall.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reminds people–sad that it has to be done–that, even in Trump outposts like Johnstown in Pennsylvania where racism has replaced reason among too many, there still are good things in this and other like communities.
  • The LRB Blog considers the plight of British-Iranian Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, whose plight in Iranian custody has been worsened by her government. What can be done for her?
  • Marginal Revolution notes how, in the early 20th century as in the early 21st century, substantial immigration to the US became politically controversial despite its benefits.
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at the art of Tove Jansson, beyond the Moomins.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer takes a look at the slow emergence of Canadian citizenship distinct from the British over the 20th century.
  • Roads and Kingdoms takes</u. a look at the grape-crashing of the vineyards of Oliver, British Columbia.
  • Peter Rukavina describes the origin of the theme music of CBC classic show The Friendly Giant in the 18th century English folk tune “Early One Morning.”
  • Seriously Science notes that oysters can apparently hear sound.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that the autonomy enjoyed by Puerto Rico was one source of inspiration for the nationalists of Tatarstan in the early 1990s.
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[URBAN NOTE] Five notes: Montréal, New York City, Palm Springs, Johnstown, global warming

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  • The Guardian reports on a new exhibition dedicated to Leonard Cohen in Montréal’s Musée d’art contemporain.
  • Apartments in Manhattan lacking doormen have apparently become cheaper recently. Bloomberg reports.
  • The city council of Palm Springs, long a queer mecca, is now composed entirely of out LGBTQ people. The Desert Sun reports.
  • Politico visits Trump voters of the declining industrial city of Johnston and finds people who still support him.
  • National Observer shares maps of sea level rise revealing the exceptional vulnerability of the cities of Canada.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Centauri Dreams notes that the search for exoplanets with life may turn up not clear, but ambiguous, evidence.
  • D-Brief notes the invention of a new, reversible invisible ink.
  • Bruce Dorminey reports on how metal-rich Sun-like star HD 173701 gives us insight into the cycles of the Sun.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining how stellar activity can erode closely-orbiting rocky exoplanets.
  • Hornet Stories reports on some problematic LGBTQ characters of colour in horror films.
  • Language Log notes how the Chinese phrase “dǎ call 打call”, used in propaganda, has gone viral.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the astonishing sympathy of John Kelly for the Confederacy.
  • The LRB Blog notes how technology and bureaucracy make borders ever more permeable.
  • Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution reflects on the wonderful Persian Letters of Montesquieu.
  • The NYR Daily notes that, whatever the Manafort-Gates scandal is, it is not Trump’s easy equivalent of Watergate.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how astronomers were able to determine A/2017 U1 did not come from this solar system.

[URBAN NOTE] Four Toronto notes: new TTC stations, Davenportage on Davenport, Lawrence West, Trump

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  • Transit Toronto notes that, on the 28th, three new TTC stations will be open for visitors.
  • Samantha Beattie describes Davenportage, a recent exploration of Davenport Road’s past as a portage route, at the Toronto Star.
  • Edward Keenan talks about how the Lawrence West SmartTrack station can be made a success, over at the Toronto Star.
  • The Toronto Star reports on how Donald Trump was the only person to profit from the former Trump Tower in Toronto.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • At Antipope, Charlie Stross bets that barring catastrophe, the US under Trump will dispatch crewed circumlunar flights.
  • D-Brief takes a look at the evolution of birds, through speculation on how the beak formed.
  • Language Log looks at the ways Trump is represented, and mocked, in the languages of East Asia.
  • Noting the death toll in a Mexico City sweatshop, Lawyers, Guns and Money reiterates that sweatshops are dangerous places to work.
  • The NYR Daily notes the many structural issues likely to prevent foreign-imposed fixes in Afghanistan.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from a seemingly unlikely date festival held in the depths of the Saudi desert.
  • Rocky Planet reports that Mount Agung, a volcano in Indonesia, is at risk of imminent eruption.
  • Drew Rowsome notes a new stage adaptation in Toronto of the Hitchcock classic, North by Northwest.
  • Strange Company reports on how the Lonergans disappeared in 1998 in a dive off the Great Barrier Reef. What happened to them?
  • Towleroad notes how Chelsea Manning was just banned from entering Canada.
  • Window on Eurasia claims that the Russian language is disappearing from Armenia.
  • Arnold Zwicky maps the usage of “faggot” as an obscenity in the United States.

[URBAN NOTE] Seven Toronto links, from condo conversions to a cat park to unsafe beaches

  • John Michael McGrath argues at TVO that leaving Toronto for Ontario cities with cheaper housing misses the issue of jobs. For starters.
  • Michelle McQuigge looks at how the CNIB is helping make Yonge and St. Clair accessible to the blind.
  • In The Globe and Mail, Erik Heinrich looks at how a mid-rise office tower at 1133 Yonge Street is being transformed into condos.
  • The Toronto Star reports that the condo/hotel tower at 325 Bay Street no longer bears the name of Trump. Toronto is free!
  • The end of the Palace Arms rooming house at King and Strachan, Christian Controneo notes at Torontoist, must be seen as terrible for the people who live there.
  • blogTO notes that E. Coli levels on mainland Toronto beaches make them unsafe for swimmers. No lake water this year!
  • blogTO notes that Montréal architect Claude Cormier, designer of HTO and Berczy, will next do a cat-themed park.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Apostrophen’s ‘Nathan Smith updates his readers about the progress of his various writing projects.
  • The Big Picture shares photos from the Battle of Mosul waged against ISIS.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the discovery of rogue binary planet 2MASS J11193254–1137466, two super-Jupiters by themselves.
  • Dangerous Minds notes the raw photography of early 20th century New York City’s Weegee.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money is rightly unimpressed by the reflexive Russophilia of The Nation. Imperialism is still imperialism …
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen strongly recommends Dali, in the Chinese province of Yunnan, for tourists.
  • The NYR Daily features Masha Gessen, looking at the truth underneath the lies of Trump.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer makes a case that Macron’s use of “civilizational” to describe Africa’s issues might be the subject of over-quick outrage.
  • Peter Rukavina describes his two weeks with a Nokia N95, without a modern smartphone. There was good and bad to this.
  • Speed River Journal’s Van Waffle explains, with photos, what hoverflies are and why they are so important.
  • Understanding Society considers a fraught question: what paths to modernization were open for China in the 1930s, before the People’s Republic?
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that, in 30 years, Moscow will be a megacity with a large population of (substantially immigrant) Muslim origin.