A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘donald trump

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomy reports on the possibility of a relatively nearby kilonova that seeded the solar nebula with heavy elements, including gold, as does Centauri Dreams.
  • The Buzz at the Toronto Public Library takes a look at books which later received video game adaptations.
  • D-Brief notes the happy news that, despite having relatively little genetic diversity, narwhals are doing well enough.
  • Imageo notes a recent shift in the centuries-long patterns of El Nino that might hint at some climate change disturbance.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that the New York Times has retrieved Trump’s tax records for 1985-1994, and notes that he lost more than a billion dollars in that time frame.
  • JSTOR considers the question of why holography and holograms have not become accepted as high art.
  • Language Log shares, from Hong Kong, an advertisement with phonetic annotation of Cantonese.
  • Daniel Nexon at Lawyers, Guns and Money considers if, as a Charlie Stross novel from 2008 imagined, we are now in a “post-attribution” era in which motives are effectively unfindable.
  • James Butler at the LRB Blog considers the sheer scale of the defeat of not just the Conservatives but Labour in British local government elections.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a paper suggesting that cooperativeness is more closely linked to intelligence than to conscientiousness.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the particular plight of women in the American prison system.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw takes a look at egging as an act of political protest.
  • The Planetary Society Blog considers the mysteries surrounding the early atmosphere of Mars. What was it made of that it retained enough heat to keep water liquid during the faint young Sun period?
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the strength of the models of contemporary cosmology, despite occasional challenges.
  • Window on Eurasia considers the extent to which pan-Turkic sentiment is relevant to the Turkic nations of Russia.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers arches, in his life and in language.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Centauri Dreams notes the possible discovery of Proxima Centauri c.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of a second circumbinary planet in the Kepler-47 system.
  • Far Outliers notes the Union reaction to the civil war battle of Shiloh.
  • Mark Graham shares a link to an article abstract examining the impact of call centres on social upgrading in South Africa.
  • io9 notes plans for closer integration between the movie and television properties of the MCU.
  • JSTOR Daily explains how Florida got its name.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the similarities between the Notre Dame fire and the destruction of the National Museum of Brazil last year.
  • The LRB Blog notes the appeal of Gothic architecture.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper suggesting that, in the United States, negative effects of the China Shock had concluded a decade ago.
  • The NYR Daily looks at Trump’s agitprop.
  • Drew Rowsome interviews actor Nathaniel Bacon on the occasion of his appearance in a new Sky Gilbert show.
  • Peter Rukavina shares a map of light pollution on PEI.
  • Starts With A Bang shares a plan for reducing light pollution in a n urbanizing world.
  • Window on Eurasia complains of a creeping annexation of Belarus by Russia.

[NEWS] Five links on politics: 2020 US, Middle East, Spain, Turkey, Latin America

  • New York Magazine is quite right to note that a 2020 reelection of Donald Trump would be a catastrophe for, among others, Democrats.
  • Iran and Turkey are the obvious winners from the disarray in Iraq, among other Middle Eastern countries. Open Democracy reports.
  • The Spanish situation is deteriorating, between the growth of separatism in Catalonia and far-right populism elsewhere. Open Democracy reports.
  • Is Latin America a region adrift in the world? Open Democracy reports.
  • Ozy notes the rapid growth of the influence of Turkey, culturally and politically, in Latin America.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Centauri Dreams considers what would be needed, and what would be the use, of a SETI search of Earth’s co-orbitals.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber considers the idea of nature potentially having legal rights in the context of corporations, likewise, actually having such.
  • D-Brief reports that the Mars 2020 probe will bring with it a mini-probe built around a helicopter.
  • io9 notes that writer Jonathan Hickman will be coming back to Marvel to write two new X-Men books this summer.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that a Trump supporter recently arrested for a Mafia slaying had earlier tried to conduct citizen’s arrests of prominent Democrats.
  • Language Hat takes a look at obscenities in Russian that do not quite make it over to English.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reacts to the massive anti-Brexit protests in the United Kingdom this past weekend.
  • Marginal Revolution discusses just how bad a Brexit is likely to be, or not.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why LIGO and like instruments have not detected gravitational wave sources within our galaxy. (Briefly, they aren’t good enough yet to pick up faint sources.)
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes that not much new has come from the release of the Mueller investigation summary.
  • Arnold Zwicky builds from a report of a new LGBTQ consumer advocate from Florida, Nik Harris.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Hamilton, Montréal, Atlantic City, Dieppe, Bangalore

  • Rick Zamperin at Global News makes the case for Hamilton to at least investigate the idea of bidding for the 2030 Commonwealth Games.
  • HuffPostQuébec hosts the argument for bringing back to the surface, in Montréal on the McGill campus, a stream running down Mount Royal that has been canalized for nearly two centuries.
  • Wired highlights the photos of Atlantic City taken by photographer Brian Rose, a city that stands as testimony to the failed promises of Trump.
  • DW notes how the French port of Dieppe stands unprepared and vulnerable in the face of Brexit.
  • Guardian Cities notes how activists and historians in the Indian city of Bangalore, or Bengaluru, are trying to preserve the ancient stone markets from development.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Ryan Anderson writes at anthro{dendum} about how the counterhistory of Vine Deloria transformed his thinking.
  • Architectuul notes some interesting architectural experiments from the post-WW2 United Kingdom.
  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes the distinctive dustiness of Large Magellanic Cloud globular cluster NGC 1898.
  • The Big Picture shares photos from the worldwide student walkout on climate change.
  • Corey Robin writes at Crooked Timber about ethics in economics.
  • The Crux points its readers to the space art of Chesley Bonestell.
  • D-Brief considers the possibility that the distinction between the sounds “f” and “v” might be a product of the soft food produced by the agricultural revolution.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes a new study suggesting there might be fifty billion free-floating planets in the Milky Way Galaxy.
  • Gizmodo considers the self-appointed archivists of obscure information on the Internet.
  • Information is Beautiful shares an informative infographic analyzing the factors that go into extending one’s life expectancy.
  • Paul Campos at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that the American system simply cannot be expected to contain the fascist impulses of Donald Trump indefinitely.
  • Marginal Revolution considers the future evolution of a more privacy-conscious Facebook.
  • The Planetary Society Blog considers the nature of the skies of mini-Neptunes.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the Kirsten McKenzie horror novel Painted.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers the possibility that the Milky Way Galaxy, despite having fewer stars than Andromeda, might be more massive.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the newly-named Neptune moon of Hippocamp, and how it came about as product of a massive collision with the larger moon of Proteus.
  • Centauri Dreams also reports on the discovery of the Neptune moon of Hippocamp.
  • Chris Bertram at Crooked Timber notes how the attempt to revoke the citizenship of Shamima Begum sets a terribly dangerous precedent for the United Kingdom.
  • D-Brief notes new evidence suggesting the role of the Deccan Traps volcanic eruptions in triggering the Cretaceous extinction event, alongside the Chixculub asteroid impact.
  • Far Outliers notes the problems of Lawrence of Arabia with Indian soldiers and with Turks.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing takes issue with the state of philosophical contemplation about technology, at least in part a structural consequence of society.
  • Hornet Stories shares this feature examining the future of gay porn, in an environment where amateur porn undermines the existing studios.
  • JSTOR Daily considers the spotty history of casting African-American dancers in ballet.
  • Language Hat suggests that the Académie française will soon accept for French feminized nouns of nouns links to professionals (“écrivaine” for a female writer, for instance).
  • The LRB Blog considers the implications of the stripping of citizenship from Shamima Begum. Who is next? How badly is citizenship weakened in the United Kingdom?
  • Marginal Revolution notes the upset of Haiti over its banning by Expedia.
  • The NYR Daily notes the tension in Turkey between the country’s liberal laws on divorce and marriage and rising Islamization.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the moment, in the history of the universe, when dark energy became the dominant factors in the universe’s evolution.
  • Towleroad remembers Roy Cohn, the lawyer who was the collaborator of Trump up to the moment of Cohn’s death from AIDS.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little takes a look at Marx’s theories of how governments worked.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the existential pressures facing many minority languages in Russia.