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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘east africa

[NEWS] Three links on Canada and globalization: Harper on NAFTA, Miniso, used clothing exports

  • MacLean’s takes apart the very bad advice of Stephen Harper to Canada over NAFTA and trade negotiations.
  • MacLean’s notes that Japanese discount retailer Miniso may undermine the local hegemony of Dollarama.
  • East Africa is starting to clamp down on North American exports of used clothes, to promote their industry. CBC reports.
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Written by Randy McDonald

October 31, 2017 at 10:00 pm

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the import of comet A/2017U1, a potential visitor from another planetary system, while Centauri Dreams also takes a look.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly celebrates Montréal’s Atwater Market, with photos.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes one report that Ceres’ primordial ocean may have mixed with its surface, to make a world covered in salty mud.
  • The Map Room Blog links to an interactive French-language map looking at census data on different neighbourhoods in different cities.
  • The New APPS Blog looks at the changing role of the judiciary as enforcing of order in a privatized world.
  • The NYR Daily wonders if North Korea’s government has firm control over its nuclear weapons, given American issues.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes the expansion of Google Maps to other worlds in our solar system.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer examines the situation facing Catalonia, and Spain, after the UDI.
  • Roads and Kingdoms takes a photographic look at Little Mogadishu, a Somali neighbourhood in Kampala, Uganda.
  • Rocky Planet notes the ongoing risk of a major volcanic eruption at Tinakula, in the Solomon Islands.
  • Understanding Society takes a look at the role and functioning of overlapping social identities.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Anthropology.net notes evidence that injured Neanderthals were cared for by their kin.
  • James Bow shares a photo of Ottawa at night and considers the growing city with its greenbelt.
  • Centauri Dreams reacts to the immense discoveries surrounding GW170817.
  • Crooked Timber considers the vexed nature of the phrase “Judeo-Christian.”
  • Bruce Dorminey notes an American government study suggesting a North Korean EMP attack could cause collapse.
  • Hornet Stories reports that Russian pop singer Zelimkhan Bakaev has been murdered in Chechnya as part of the anti-gay purges.
  • Language Hat looks at lunfardo, the Italian-inflicted argot of Buenos Aires.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that, with Trump undermining the US, the prospects of China’s rise to define the new world order are looking good.
  • The NYR Daily looks at reports of significant electoral fraud in Kenya.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw looks at the continuing Australian reaction to China’s Belt and Road project.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from Sichuan’s peppercorn fields at harvest time.
  • Drew Rowsome responds to Andrew Pyper’s new novel, The Only Child.
  • Strange Company looks at the mysterious 1900 woman of New Yorker Kathryn Scharn.
  • Strange Maps looks at an ingenious, if flawed, map of the Berlin metro dating from the 1920s.
  • Peter Watts considers the question of individual identity over time. What changes, what stays the same?
  • Window on Eurasia notes that a shift from their native languages to Russian will not end minority ethnic identities.

[NEWS] Five science links: Uganda coffee, the cetenophore, the Rapanui, Proxima b, Przybylski’s star

  • National Geographic reports on how, unchecked, global warming may wreck the coffee industry of Uganda.
  • Aeon notes the nervous system of the ctenophore, product of a separate evolutionary process from our own.
  • Phys.org describes a recent study suggesting Easter Island was not wrecked by ecocide. (The Rapanui were devastated by others, I would add.)
  • Even with an active magnetic field, an Earth-like atmosphere of Proxima Centauri b might be eroded away by flares. Universe Today reports on the climate model making this prediction.
  • Does bizarre Przybylski’s star, HD 101065, contain exotic superheavy elements in its atmosphere? New Scientist wonders.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Centauri Dreams notes the exobiological potential of Titamn after the detection of acrylonitrile. Cryogenic life?
  • This guest essay at Lawyers, Guns and Money on the existential problems of Brazil, with politics depending on people not institutions, is a must-read.
  • The LRB Blog considers, in the context of Brexit, what exactly might count for some as a marker of dictatorship.
  • Did the 15th century construction of the Grand Canal in China lead the Ming away from oceanic travel? Marginal Revolution speculates.
  • The NYR Daily considers</a. the disconcertingly thorough and apparently effective of Kagame's Rwanda.
  • Out There explores the reasons why the most massive planets all have the same size.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes the 5th anniversary of the arrival of Curiosity on Mars.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that, with regards to Venezuela, the United States has no good options.
  • Roads and Kingdoms considers the febrile political mood of Kenya.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that Putin is making the mistake of seeing the United States through the prism of Russia.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes a proposal for British mayors to have representation at Brexit talks makes no sense.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • The Big Picture shares photos of the South Sudanese refugee exodus into Uganda.
  • blogTO shares an ad for a condo rental on Dovercourt Road near me, only $1800 a month.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on the idea of using waste heat to detect extraterrestrial civilizations.
  • Crooked Timber uses the paradigm of Jane Jacobs’ challenge to expert in the context of Brexit.
  • The LRB Blog reports on the fishers of Senegal and their involvement in that country’s history of emigration.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares an image comparing Saturn’s smaller moons.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy comes out in support of taking down Confederate monuments.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Chechens are coming out ahead of Daghestanis in the North Caucasus’ religious hierarchies, and argues that Putin cannot risk letting Ukraine become a model for Russia.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at various bowdlerizations of Philip Larkin’s famous quote about what parents do to their children.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Dangerous Minds notes a remarkable Japanese magazine featuring photos of rock stars from the 1970s and 1980s.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the death of drag legend Lady Chablis.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the exceptional skepticism of some with the idea of a guaranteed minimum income in Kenya.
  • The NYRB Daily interviews Chinese documentary filmmaker Ai Xiaoming, who despairs for the future of civil society in her country.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer contrasts race and politics in the states of Alabama and Mississippi.
  • Registan notes the orderly succession of power in post-Karimov Uzbekistan.
  • Torontoist notes that the TTC can be a nightmare for women.