A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘economics

[NEWS] Five sci-tech links: cryptocurrency in Hamilton and Québec, Alberta, fish, libraires

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  • Hamilton, Ontario, is apparently becoming a major centre for cryptocurrency mining. CBC reports.
  • Hydro-Québec is considering higher electricity rates for bitcoin miners. Global News reports.
  • The rate at which Alberta’s natural environments are disappearing in the face of development is alarming. Global News reports.
  • Fish habitats in Canada, happily, will receive extra protection under a new federal law. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Public libraries are successfully reinventing themselves as places where users can access technology generally. MacLean’s reports.
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Written by Randy McDonald

February 16, 2018 at 7:00 pm

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: budget, 401 Richmond, Scarborough, Torstar, Six Points

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  • Edward Keenan is critical of a Toronto city budget that does not have a particular clear focus, over at the Toronto Star.
  • The new tax subclass for culture centres like 401 Richmond, Edward Keenan writes, is but the first step toward Toronto becoming the sort of city we might want it to be. The Toronto Star has it.
  • It should be obvious, right, that people deserve to know the cost of the Scarborough subway extension before the election, particularly voters? Edward Keenan, again writes at the Toronto Star.
  • The idea that Torstar needs government funding to survive–that it should receive such funding, as a purveyor of news for the masses–is sad but makes sense. Why not government support for media, to help them stay alive? The Globe and Mail shares the idea.
  • The Six Points intersection in Etobicoke is going to see a partial closure for the next couple of days, Transit Toronto notes. You know, I’ve always wanted to see this place …

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • The Buzz recommends twenty-four different novels for Valentine’s Day, drawing on the recommendations of employees of the Toronto Public Library.
  • Centauri Dreams links to a new paper suggesting there are thousands of objects of extrasolar origin, some tens of kilometres in size, in our planetary system right now.
  • D-Brief notes that cryptocurrency is hindering the search for extraterrestrial life, as miners buy up the graphics cards SETI researchers need.
  • Lyman Stone at In A State of Migration notes how unbalanced the marriage market can be for professional women in the United States interested in similar partners, especially for African-American women.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how deeply the dreams of Martin Luther King Jr. for racial equality in the United States were driven by anti-colonial nationalism in Africa.
  • The LRB Blog notes how the life and writing of Penelope Fitzgerald was influenced by two decades of living on the English coast, suspended between land and water.
  • At the NYR Daily, Melissa Chadburn tells of what she learned from counting, and queueing, and perservering in routines.
  • At The Numerati, Stephen Baker shares an excerpt from his new book, Dark Site, describing a teenager’s attempts to control a cognitive implant.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer takes issue with elements of the timing of Lyman Stone’s schedule for immigration controls imposed in the United Kingdom on Caribbean migrants.
  • At the Planetary Society Blog, Emily Lakdawalla explains how scientists are keeping the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter in good stead despite its age.
  • At Roads and Kingdoms, Timi Siytangco explains the history of the Philippines through nine Filipino foods.
  • Drew Rowsome is impressed by the power of The Assassination of Gianni Versace.
  • Ethan Siegel at Starts With A Bang explains why black holes have to contain singularities, not merely superdense normal matter.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the rather misogynistic essay of ideologue Vladimir Surkin about women and power, timed for Valentine’s Day.

[URBAN NOTE] Four city links: New York City, Pittsburgh, Vancouver, Saskatoon and Regina

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  • The landlord who destroyed the 5Pointz warehouse in New York City, for real estate development, despite the importance of its graffiti, has been ordered to compensate the art’s creators almost seven million dollars. VICE reports.
  • Pittsburgh’s model of urban renaissance, based on heavy investment in high-tech and education, is still used as a model for cities everywhere. Bloomberg View has it.
  • Vancouver has announced plans to remove viaducts and to replace them with towers and park space. Global News reports.
  • Saskatoon and Regina, the two leading cities of Saskatchewan, are leading Canada in terms of growth. Global News reports.

[URBAN NOTE] Six Toronto links: Come From Away, Toronto Tool Library, 401 Richmond, homeless, crime

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  • Toronto Life interviews the creators of hit musical Come From Away, come back from New York City to play in Toronto.
  • blogTO notes that crowdfunding has saved the Toronto Tool Library.
  • Toronto city council backs a bigger tax break for culture hubs like 401 Richmond, the Toronto Star reports.
  • Paul Salvatori at NOW Toronto reports on one night–sad, fearful–that he spent in a Toronto shelter for the homeless. Surely the city can do better?
  • The Church of the Holy Trinity recently saw a memorial ceremony for the homeless of Toronto. The Toronto Star reports.
  • The iconic Leuty lifeguard station, down at Woodbine Beach, was recently tagged with racist graffiti. Police are investigating.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Yesterday, James Bow celebrated the 16th anniversary of his blog.
  • Centauri Dreams shares some of the latest probe imagery from the Kuiper Belt.
  • D-Brief notes the amount of energy used in bitcoin mining in Iceland is set to surpass the energy used by Iceland’s human population. This cannot be a viable trajectory.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes the steady expansion of China’s nascent space industry, with Wenchang on the southern island of Hainan being a particular focus.
  • Drone360 notes that, in certain conditions, drones can make parcel deliveries at a lower environmental cost than traditional courier methods.
  • io9 notes Wesley Snipes’ observations as to why Blade is not more generally recognized as the first big superhero film.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the various influences, from those of formal portraiture to African-American folk culture, in the recent Amy Sherald painting of Michelle Obama and her dress.
  • Language Hat notes the publication of a new collection of the poems of Juan Latino, an African slave in 16th century Spain who went on to become a free man and leading poet.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the appalling treatment that many national parks in the US are going to experience, deprived of professional management and opened to development.
  • Lingua Franca, at the Chronicle of Higher Education, notes how on Valentine’s Day there is such a close and visible link between hearts and ashes.
  • The LRB Blog notes outbursts of racism and fascism in Italy following a murder of an Italian by an immigrant.
  • Leon Aron at the NYR Daily looks at the past century of millennarianism in the politics of countries on the edge, from Lenin to ISIS.
  • Towleroad notes how Burberry has introduced the colours of the LGBTQ rainbow to its plaid in its February 2018 collection, as a fundraiser for charity.
  • Window on Eurasia notes a demographer who predicts, on the basis of reliable demographic trends, a sharp uptick in the Muslim proportion of the Russian population in coming decades.

[URBAN NOTE] Four city links: global distribution, smaller cities, AI in cities, shopping mall music

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  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper suggesting that whereas cities in developed countries tend to be spread evenly across resource-rich agricultural areas, cities in developing countries tend to cluster near coasts where transport is easier.
  • At In Medias Res, Russell Arben Fox responds to Krugman in considering what role there is for smaller cities and towns in the 21st century.
  • Tracey Lauriault at Policy Options argues that, in projects like Google’s involvement in Toronto’s Quayside, the underlying values of the AI systems used should always be thoughtfully considered. What do they represent?
  • Dangerous Minds shares the oddly haunting YouTube videos of a man who plays classic 1980s pop songs in deserted shopping malls.