A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘economics

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the remarkably enduring supernova iPTF14hls, which seems to have attained its longevity through massive amounts of antimatter.
  • blogTO notes plans for the construction of a new public square in Chinatown, on Huron Street.
  • James Bow shares a short story of his, set in a future where everyone has a guaranteed minimum income but few have a job.
  • A poster at Crasstalk shares a nostalgic story about long-lost summers as a child in Albuquerque in the 1960s.
  • Bruce Dorminey reports on Universe, a beautiful book concerned with the history of astronomical imagery.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog explores the latent and manifest functions of education for job-seekers.
  • Far Outliers’ Joel talks about the Red Terror imposed by Lenin in 1918, and its foreshadowing of the future of the Soviet Union.
  • Language Hat links to a lovely analysis of a Tang Chinese poem, “On the Frontier.”
  • Language Log notes how the name of Chinese food “congee” ultimately has origins in Dravidian languages.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money takes note of the suspicious timing of links between the Trump family and Wikileaks.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen recounts his visit to an Amazon bookstore, and what he found lacking (or found good).
  • The NYR Daily notes the continuing controversy over the bells of the church of Balangiga, in the Philippines, taken as booty in 1901 by American forces and not returned.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders why Canadian incomes and productivity have historically been 20-30% lower than those of the United States, and why incomes have lately caught up.
  • Roads and Kingdoms considers the simple pleasures of an egg and cracker snack in the Faroe Islands.
  • Strange Company considers the bizarre 1910 murder of Massachusetts lawyer William Lowe Rice.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes an Australian publisher that suspended publication of a book in Australia for fear of negative reaction from China.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares some photos of his orchids, blooming early because of warm temperatures.
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[ISL] Three PEI links: economic growth, employment insurance zones, gleaners in the fields

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  • Prince Edward Island is apparently again leading the Maritimes in economic growth. This is something of an unexpected reversal. The Guardian reports.
  • The division of PEI into two zones for employment insurance purposes, one around Charlottetown and the other including the rest of the island, does–among other things–reflect growing regional economic divides. CBC reports.
  • Gleaners, people combing the fields of the Island looking for edible food left after the harvest, is apparently a thing. CBC reports.

Written by Randy McDonald

November 13, 2017 at 10:30 pm

[URBAN NOTE] Four Toronto links: photographs, John Scott, condos for families, repurposed spaces

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  • blogTO shares some of the earliest surviving photographs of Toronto.
  • Emma McIntosh interviews John Scott, the man who resets the clock towers of Toronto when daylight saving time comes and goes, over at the Toronto Star.
  • CBC notes that many of the new condo units of Toronto are not sized appropriately for families.
  • Erin Davis notes at Torontoist that repurposed spaces lend themselves to reuse by everyone from artists to developers.

Written by Randy McDonald

November 8, 2017 at 4:15 pm

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto housing links: condos, East York, Sunshine Valley, economics, migration

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  • First-time home buyers in Toronto are focusing their energies on condos. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Meaghan Hyckie writes about knowing she won’t be able to afford a home in her family’s East York area neighbourhood. NOW Toronto features her article.
  • Richard Longley writes about the East York area of Sunshine Valley, notable as an effort at mass housing post-WW2, over at NOW Toronto.
  • A Richmond Hill woman was caught by the housing market crash as she was selling her home and buying a new one. Global News reports.
  • Are high Toronto housing prices discouraging people–including talented professionals–from moving to the city? The Toronto Star reports.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Anthrodendum shares an essay by Yana Stainova talking about restoring a sense of enchantment to ethnography.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at NGTS-1b, a hot Jupiter unusually orbiting a red dwarf star, as does Centauri Dreams.
  • D-Brief looks at how the relativistic jets of matter issuing from central black holes in active galaxies work.
  • Hornet Stories notes an upcoming revival of Boys in the Band by Ryan Murphy, with Zachary Quinto and Matt Bomer.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that 28% of those polled worldwide would favour recriminalizing homosexuality.
  • Language Hat looks at the role played by Italian dialect in games of bocce.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a study examining some of the structural economic failings of socialism in Yugoslavia.
  • Neuroskeptic wonders if there should be a place where people can make use of perfectly good abandoned data sets.
  • Understanding Society looks at the yawning gap between social science theories and actual policies.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how above-average immigrant fertility helps keep birth rates up in Moscow.

[NEWS] Three links on Canada and globalization: Harper on NAFTA, Miniso, used clothing exports

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  • MacLean’s takes apart the very bad advice of Stephen Harper to Canada over NAFTA and trade negotiations.
  • MacLean’s notes that Japanese discount retailer Miniso may undermine the local hegemony of Dollarama.
  • East Africa is starting to clamp down on North American exports of used clothes, to promote their industry. CBC reports.

Written by Randy McDonald

October 31, 2017 at 10:00 pm

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Anthropology.net looks at Adam Rutherford’s new book A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived, about the human family tree.
  • Crooked Timber argues that secret British government reports on Brexit really should be leaked.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas argues that the concept of “Luddites” deserves to be revisited.
  • Language Hat takes a look at the potential for emojis to overwhelm Unicode, as does Language Log.
  • The LRB Blog reports on some astounding jokes about sexual assault made on British television.
  • The Planetary Society Blog explores the state of the search for Planet Nine.
  • Roads and Kingdoms takes a look on the people who live in one of Manila’s largest cemeteries.
  • Drew Rowsome quite likes God’s Own Country, a British film that tells the story of two gay farmers in love.
  • Starts With a Bang’s Ethan Siegel examines why the gravitational wave of GW170817 arrived 1.7 seconds before the light.
  • Mark Simpson takes issue with the recent study suggesting sexual orientations could be determined from profile pics.
  • Strange Company tells of how a ghost hunter had a terrible time trying to track down one supposed haunter.
  • Strange Maps notes an 1864 map of the United States imagining a future country divided into four successor states.
  • Understanding Society takes a look at a recent study of the position of small farmers in India.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that the economic role of immigrants in Russia is critical, to the tune of 10% of GDP.