A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘education

[URBAN NOTE] Six Toronto links: street art, journalism, police, Cheri DiNovo, transit at Dundas West

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  • CBC notes that the Yonge and Dundas street artist scene is closing down under city regulations, including permits.
  • Emily Mathieu talks about how she conducts her journalism with some of Toronto’s most marginalized as subjects.
  • The Globe and Mail notes the local controversy over having police officers permanently stationed in schools.
  • The idea that police who actively undermine the Special Investigations Unit should be seriously punished seems obvious.
  • Veteran NDP politican and LGBTQ rights advocate Cheri DiNovo is leaving politics to become a minister in church.
  • Finally, the Dundas West TTC station will be connected to the GO Transit hub less than 300 metres away!
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[NEWS] Five science and technology links: Darjeeling tea, Fitbits, cannabis, PrEP, Planet Nine

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  • Climate change is making the famous tea of Darjeeling much more difficult to come by. VICE reports.
  • Wired notes Fitbits are useful tracking devices for scientists engaged in studies, too. (I always wear mine.)
  • I entirely approve of this new Niagara College program. Why not legalize and professionalize cannabis agriculture?
  • This VICE interview with bringing the Truvada needed for inexpensive PrEP across the border into Canada is of note.
  • A new study suggests that Planet Nine, if it exists, was likely not captured by the young sun but formed here. Universe Today reports.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Centauri Dreams celebrates the science behind Cassini.
  • Crooked Timber’s Henry Farrell is breaking from Harvard’s Kennedy Centre over its revocation of an invitation to Chelsea Manning.
  • The Crux points to the ways in which the legacy of Cassini will still be active.
  • D-Brief notes that some tool-using macaques of Thailand are overfishing their environment.
  • Hornet Stories notes the eulogy given by Hillary Clinton at the funeral of Edie Windsor.
  • Inkfish notes one way to define separate bird species: ask the birds what they think. (Literally.)
  • The LRB Blog notes the recent passing of Margot Hielscher, veteran German star and one-time crush of Goebbels.
  • The NYR Daily notes the chilling effects on discourse in India of a string of murders of Indian journalists and writers.
  • At the Planetary Science Blog, Emily Lakdawalla bids farewell to the noble Cassini probe.
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes a breakfast in Bangladesh complicated by child marriage.
  • Towleroad notes an Australian church cancelled an opposite-sex couple’s wedding because the bride supports equality.
  • Arnold Zwicky notes the marmots of, among other places, cosmopolitan and multilingual Swiss canton of Graubünden.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Anthrodendum considers the difficulties of the anthropologist in the context of a world where their knowledges are monetized.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about two days she spent in Montréal, with photos.
  • Crooked Timber starts a discussion about the justice, or lack thereof, in Harvard denying convicted murderer Michelle Jones entry into their doctoral program now that her sentence is over.
  • D-Brief looks at the changing nature of the global disease burden, and its economic consequences.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that Equifax’s terribly lax data protection should mark the endgame for them.
  • The Map Room Blog considers the use of earth-observer satellites to predict future disease outbreaks (malaria, here, in Peru).
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how quantum mechanics helps explain nuclear fusion in our sun.
  • Window on Eurasia notes a report that Muscovites live on average 12 years longer than non-Muscovite Russians.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Acts of Minor Treason’s Andrew Barton reacts to the series premiere of Orville, finding it oddly retrograde and unoriginal.
  • Centauri Dreams shares Larry Klaes’ article considering the impact of the 1956 classic Forbidden Planet on science and science fiction alike.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper wondering if it is by chance that Earth orbits a yellow dwarf, not a dimmer star.
  • Drone360 shares a stunning video of a drone flying into Hurricane Irma.
  • Hornet Stories celebrates the 10th anniversary of Chris Crocker’s “Leave Britney Alone!” video. (It was important.)
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money wonders if 16 years are long enough to let people move beyond taboo images, like those of the jumpers.
  • The LRB Blog takes a look at the young Dreamers, students, who have been left scrambling by the repeal of DACA.
  • The Map Room Blog notes how a Québec plan to name islands in the north created by hydro flooding after literature got complicated by issues of ethnicity and language.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the rise of internal tourism in China, and soon, of Chinese tourists in the wider world.
  • The NYR Daily has an interview arguing that the tendency to make consciousness aphysical or inexplicable is harmful to proper study.
  • Roads and Kingdoms has a brief account of a good experience with Indonesian wine.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell links to five reports about Syria. They are grim reading.

[NEWS] Four National Post links: Nootka Island, satanic panic, Iceland volcanoes, Norton anthology

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  • An unethical Victoria psychologist and his vulnerable patient helped spark the Satanic panic of the 1980s.
  • There seems to be a romance to the life of the lighthouse keepers of Nootka Island.
  • The Icelanders are watching very carefully for signs of the next big volcanic eruption. (Tourists are a concern.)
  • Who can forget all the different Norton anthologies of literature? I still have mine. The National Post remembers in a brief piece.

Written by Randy McDonald

September 8, 2017 at 11:30 pm

[URBAN NOTE] Five links on a changing Toronto: the Ward, Yorkville development, school crowding

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  • Torontoist introduces its readers to the now-vanished neighbourhood of The Ward.
  • The heated discussion of condo development in Yorkville has been taken to the level of community mediation.
  • Yorkville is an ever-changing neighbourhood, evolving far past its low-rent hippie days of the 1960s. The Globe and Mail explores.
  • NOW Toronto notes how the York Square development in Yorkville is set to be leveled, past value notwithstanding.
  • Global News reports on how in some booming neighbourhoods, like Leslieville, local parents cannot find places for kids in local schools.

Written by Randy McDonald

September 8, 2017 at 7:30 pm