A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘education

[URBAN NOTE] Five notes about change: U of T, Wexford Plaza, Parkdale, Metro, French immersion

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  • Universiy of Toronto contract staff have voted overwhelmingly for a strike mandate. CBC reports.
  • Wexford Plaza, an independent film centered around shopping guards at the Scarborough mall of the same name, has done well in Los Angeles and is set to open here in Toronto. blogTO reports.
  • NOW Toronto notes a protest by Parkdale residents for affordable housing at King and Dufferin, where a massive new development is expected to rise.
  • In response to the new $15 minimum wage, Metro is cutting service hours at some of its 23-hour grocery stores. blogTO reports.
  • I sincerely hope that staffing shortages will not lead the TDSB to cut French immersion from its list of programs. The Toronto Star reports.
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[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • D-Brief notes that the opioid epidemic seems to be hitting baby boomers and millennials worst, of all major American demographics.
  • Hornet Stories shares one timetable for new DC films following Justice League.
  • Joe. My. God. notes a case brought by a Romanian before the European Court of Justice regarding citizenship rights for his American spouse. This could have broad implications for the recognition of same-sex couples across the EU, not just its member-states.
  • Language Hat reports on a journalist’s search for a village in India where Sanskrit, ancient liturgical language of Hinduism, remains the vernacular.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a review of an intriuging new book, Nowherelands, looking at ephemeral countries in the 1840-1975 era.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the textile art of Anni Albers.
  • The Planetary Society Blog explores the navigational skills of the Polynesians, and their reflection in Moana.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on the widespread jubilation in Zimbabwe following the overthrow of Mugabe.
  • Rocky Planet notes that Öræfajökull, the largest volcano in Iceland if a hidden one, has been showing worrying signs of potential eruption.
  • Drew Rowsome reports on House Guests, an art installation that has taken over an entire house at Dundas and Ossington.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the story of how the quantum property of spin was discovered.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests new Russian policies largely excluding non-Russian languages from education are causing significant problems, even ethnic conflict.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers music as a trigger of emotional memory, generally and in his own life.

[URBAN NOTE] Four Toronto links: NOW Toronto, ghost signs, The Ward, Southey on Peterson

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  • Alice Klein of NOW Toronto asks her publication’s readers for more support. This is worrisome: I hope NOW Toronto will be OK.
  • blogTO talks about the “ghost signs” of Toronto, legacies of businesses and products long since past, with photos.
  • Toronto Life shares, from the website of the Toronto Ward Museum, a selection of photos depicting The Ward, the downtown Toronto neighbourhood erased by the construction of City Hall.
  • In a brilliant column at MacLean’s employing her trademark smart humour, Tabatha Southey wonders if Jordan Peterson is, in fact, “a stupid person’s smart man”.

[NEWS] Five links about population in small centres: education, Ontario, Atlantic Canada

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  • Noah Smith at Bloomberg notes that universities, and other centres of higher education, can play a critical role in keeping small centres alive, in the US and elsewhere.
  • Michelle McQuigge notes that the northern Ontario town of Smooth Rock Falls has seen success attracting potential new residents with sales of land for cheap, for the Canadian Press.
  • Jessica Leeder tells the sad story about how the politics of a community radio station in Newfoundland’s Bell Island tore the community apart, over at The Globe and Mail.
  • CBC notes that the influx of Syrian refugees to Nova Scotia has reversed a trend of population decline. Will it last? More here.
  • The government of Prince Edward Island has an ambitious strategy to boost the Island’s population, through immigration, to 160 thousand by 2022. More here.

[META] Six new blogs on the blogroll

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I will be doing the hard work of installing these six blogs on my blogroll later this weekend. For now, suffice it to say that these six blogs, still-extant islands in a blogosphere in a state of transformation, are going to be the last I’ll be adding for some time. It can be hard to keep up with them all.

  • Daily JSTOR is the famed scholarly archive’s blog. This 1 November post, timed for Nanowrimo, sharing some inspiring quotes from writers about writing, is fun.
  • The blog by Lyman Stone, In a State of Migration, has great analyses of demographic issues in the United States and wider world. This recent post, looking at what it would take to–as the alt-right would wish–“make America white” and the enormous costs of this goal, is worth noting.
  • Information is Beautiful, by famed data journalist David McCandless has all sorts of fantastic infographics. I recommend this one, looking at the United Kingdom’s options re: Brexit.
  • The Chronicle of Higher Education’s blog Lingua Franca takes a look at language and writing. This recent post, analyzing the complexities and challenges of George Orwell’s thought on freedom of expression, is very good.
  • Noahpinion is the blog of Bloomberg writer Noah Smith. I quite liked this older essay, one noting that cyberpunk’s writers seem to have gotten the future, unlike other writers in other SF subgenres. Does rapid change lead to bad predictions?
  • Salmagundi is a blog by an anonymous gay Kentucky writer touching on the subjects of his life and more. The most recent post is this link to an essay by Bruce Snider, talking about the lack of rural gay poets.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Centauri Dreams takes a look at the exciting early news on potentially habitable nearby exoplanet Ross 128 b.
  • The Crux notes that evidence has been found of Alzheimer-like illness in dolphins. Is this, as the scientists argue, a symptom of a syndrome shared between us, big-brained social species with long post-fertility lifespans?
  • D-Brief takes a look at the idea of contemporary life on Mars hiding away in the icy regolith near the surface.
  • Far Outliers notes one argument that Germany lost the Second World War because of the poor quality of its leaders.
  • Gizmodo notes the incredibly bright event PS1-10adi, two and a half billion light-years away. What is it? No one knows …
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money celebrates the end of the Mugabe dictatorship in Zimbabwe.
  • The Map Room Blog links to some fascinating detailed maps of the outcome of the Australian mail-in vote on marriage equality.
  • Roads and Kingdoms visits rural Mexico after the recent quake.
  • Cheri Lucas Rowlands shares some beautiful photos of fantastical Barcelona.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the insights provided by Pluto’s mysterious cool atmosphere, with its cooling haze, has implications for Earth at a time of global warming.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Russia is not going to allow even Tatarstan to include the Tatar language as a mandatory school subject.

[NEWS] Five notes on cultural change: Jordan Peterson, blogging under ISIS, India, Canadian drama

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  • NOW Toronto observes that U of T professor Jordan Peterson is directly threatening other members of the academic community to which he belongs.
  • VICE reports on how an Iraqi in Mosul managed to maintain an ISIS-critical blog while under ISIS rule.
  • Mihir Sharma notes, for Bloomberg View, that Indian education needs to be vastly improved if India is to take off.
  • This exploration of the reasons why Canadian playwrights are big in Japan is fascinating. (Translator Tohoshi Yoshihara is a huge fan.) NOW Toronto explores.