A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘egypt

[URBAN NOTE] Eight Toronto links

  • blogTO notes the strange house, a fantasia inspired by Greece, at 1016 Shaw Street.
  • blogTO shares photos from inside Paradise Theatre on Bloor, reopened after 13 years.
  • blogTO notes that GO Transit will now be offering customers unlimited rides on Sundays for just $C 10.
  • Photos of infamous Toronto chair girl Marcella Zoia celebrating her 20th birthday are up at blogTO, here.
  • Many residents displaced by the Gosford fire in North York have been moved to hotels. Global News reports.
  • A TTC worker has launched a court case against the TTC and city of Toronto over issues of air quality. Global News reports.
  • Jamie Bradburn reports on how the Toronto press covered the opening of the Suez Canal, here.
  • Transit Toronto explains what, exactly, workers are building at Eglinton station and Yonge and Eglinton more generally.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Architectuul visits the studio of Barbas Lopes Arquitectos in Lisbon, here.
  • Bad Astronomer takes a look at a new paper examining the effectiveness of different asteroid detection technologies, including nuclear weapons.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on a new study suggesting potentially habitable planets orbiting Alpha Centauri B, smaller of the two stars, could suffer from rapid shifts of their axes.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber argues some polls suggest some American conservatives really would prefer Russia as a model to California.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes the discovery, by the Murchison Widefield Array in Australia, of 27 supernova remnants in our galaxy.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares a collection of links about stealth aircraft, here.
  • Gizmodo notes a new study suggesting that DNA is but one of very very many potential genetic molecules.
  • Language Hat shares a reevaluation of the Richard Stanyhurst translation of the Aeneid, with its manufactured words. Why mightn’t this have been not mockable but rather creative?
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money celebrated the 50th anniversary of the takeover of Alcatraz Island by Native American activists.
  • Chris Bertram writes at the LRB Blog, after the catastrophe of the Essex van filled with dozens of dead migrants, about the architecture of exclusion that keeps out migrants.
  • Marginal Revolution shares a comment looking at the fentanyl crisis from a new angle.
  • Jenny Uglow writes at the NYR Daily about a Science Museum exhibit highlighting the dynamic joys of science and its progress over the centuries.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw takes a look at the question of how to prevent the wildfires currently raging in Australia. What could have been done, what should be done?
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on proposals from China for two long-range probe missions to interstellar space, including a Neptune flyby.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the wonderfully innocent Pinocchio currently playing at the Young People’s Theatre.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the evidence for the universe, maybe, being closed.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that the Alexandria Patriarchate is the next Orthodox body to recognize the Ukrainian church.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at irregular versus regular, as a queer word too.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares images of galaxy M61.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at a proposal for the Solar Cruiser probe, a NASA probe that would use a solar sail.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of bacteria on coasts which manufacture dimethyl sulfide.
  • Bruce Dorminey writes about some facts about the NASA X-15 rocket plane.
  • The Dragon’s Tales reports on the strange nuclear accident in Nyonoksa, Russia.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on the recent uncovering of the ancient Egyptian city of Heracleion, under the Mediterranean.
  • Language Hat looks at 19th century standards on ancient Greek language.
  • Language Log notes an ironically swapped newspaper article subhead.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the role of Tom Cotton in the recent Greenland scandal.
  • Marginal Revolution glances at the relationship between China and Singapore.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how the car ride played a role in the writing of Jacques Lacan.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares an index on state fragility around the world.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why Jupiter suffers so many impacts from incoming bodies.
  • John Scalzi at Whatever reports on what seems to have been an enjoyable concert experience with Iron Maiden.
  • Window on Eurasia reports a claim that, with regards to a border dispute, Chechnya is much more unified than Dagestan.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Anthro{dendum} features an essay examining trauma and resiliency as encountered in ethnographic fieldwork.
  • Architectuul highlights a new project seeking to promote historic churches built in the United Kingdom in the 20th century.
  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait examines Ahuna Mons, a muddy and icy volcano on Ceres, and looks at the nebula Westerhout 40.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the recent mass release of data from a SETI project, and notes the discovery of two vaguely Earth-like worlds orbiting the very dim Teegarden’s Star, just 12 light-years away.
  • Chris Bertram at Crooked Timber notes that having universities as a safe space for trans people does not infringe upon academic freedom.
  • The Crux looks at the phenomenon of microsleep.
  • D-Brief notes evidence that the Milky Way Galaxy was warped a billion years ago by a collision with dark matter-heavy dwarf galaxy Antlia 2, and notes a robotic fish powered by a blood analogue.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that India plans on building its own space station.
  • Earther notes the recording of the song of the endangered North Pacific right whale.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog looks at the role of emotional labour in leisure activities.
  • Far Outliers looks at how Japan prepared for the Battle of the Leyte Gulf in 1944.
  • Gizmodo looks at astronomers’ analysis of B14-65666, an ancient galactic collision thirteen billion light-years away, and notes that the European Space Agency has a planned comet interception mission.
  • io9 notes how the plan for Star Trek in the near future is to not only have more Star Trek, but to have many different kinds of Star Trek for different audiences.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the observation of Pete Buttigieg that the US has probably already had a gay president.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the many ways in which the rhetoric of Celtic identity has been used, and notes that the archerfish uses water ejected from its eyes to hunt.
  • Language Hat looks at why Chinese is such a hard language to learn for second-language learners, and looks at the Suso monastery in Spain, which played a key role in the coalescence of the Spanish language.
  • Language Log looks at the complexities of katakana.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the death of deposed Egypt president Mohammed Morsi looks like a slow-motion assassination, and notes collapse of industrial jobs in the Ohio town of Lordstown, as indicative of broader trends.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the death of Mohamed Morsi.
  • The Map Rom Blog shares a new British Antarctic Survey map of Greenland and the European Arctic.
  • Marginal Revolution notes how non-religious people are becoming much more common in the Middle East, and makes the point that the laying of cable for the transatlantic telegraph is noteworthy technologically.
  • Noah Smith at Noahpionion takes the idea of the Middle East going through its own version of the Thirty Years War seriously. What does this imply?
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at a Lebanon balanced somehow on the edge, and looks at the concentration camp system of the United States.
  • The Planetary Society Blog explains what people should expect from LightSail 2, noting that the LightSail 2 has launched.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw points readers to his stories on Australian spy Harry Freame.
  • Rocky Planet explains, in the year of the Apollo 50th anniversary, why the Moon matters.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews, and praises, South African film Kanarie, a gay romp in the apartheid era.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog links to a paper examining the relationship between childcare and fertility in Belgium, and looks at the nature of statistical data from Turkmenistan.
  • The Strange Maps Blog shares a map highlighting different famous people in the United States.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why different galaxies have different amounts of dark matter, and shares proof that the Apollo moon landings actually did happen.
  • Towleroad notes the new evidence that poppers, in fact, are not addictive.
  • Window on Eurasia warns about the parlous state of the Volga River.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes an extended look at the mid-20th century gay poet Frank O’Hara.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Architectuul looks at a new architecture project intent on the interface between land and sea.
  • Bad Astronomy reports on the impact of a meteorite with a house in Uruguay.
  • Caitlin Kelly at the Broadside Blog writes about the importance of lightening the loads of others when one can.
  • Centauri Dreams writes about how OSIRIS-REx is responding to unexpected conditions at Bennu like its relative rockiness. https://www.centauri-dreams.org/2019/03/21/working-with-the-unexpected-at-asteroid-bennu/
  • The Crux considers the remarkable versatility of ketamine, as anesthetic and anti-depressant among other things.
  • D-Brief notes a report that reveals universal patterns of app usage on cell phones by different people.
  • Dangerous Minds shares some vintage R.E.M. performances from 1981.
  • Earther notes that temperatures in parts of Alaska have just briefly peaked at 70 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Gizmodo notes the new accurate guide for walkers provided by a new Google Maps system making use of landmarks.
  • Kieran Healy breaks down some data from the 2018 General Social Survey.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that the Sylvester classic “You Make Me Feel (Mighty Real)” has been selected for preservation by the National Registry of the Library of Congress.
  • JSTOR Daily makes a case for treating the art of children not as mere scribblings but rather as art worthy of serious consideration.
  • Language Hat notes the sensitive translation by one man of the Bible into the 20th century vernacular Arabic of Egypt.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the Mueller report, what is and is not likely to be in it, and how one should react to it.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the extent to which the employment rates of women has been a driving factor in recent American economic history.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw celebrates his 13th anniversary of blogging.
  • Roads and Kingdoms interviews Shannon Mustipher on Caribbean rum culture.
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at the new interactive theatre piece Amorous Playlist.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why quantum tunneling does not violate the speed of light.
  • Towleroad notes that the André Aciman sequel to Call Me By Your Name, Find Me, is scheduled for an October release.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes how the denaturalization by Italy of a man who committed terrible criminal acts sets a bad precedent for citizenship generally.
  • Window on Eurasia lists five tactics that non-Russian republics in Russia could adopt to resist their abolition.
  • Arnold Zwicky begins a meditation that starts with the sight of a vegetarian reuben sandwich.

[CAT] Five cat links: AI, psychology, Captain Marvel, Ancient Egypt, New York City

  • Fast Company reports on NVIDIA’s StyleGAN AI, an engine that cannot generate convincing images of cats.
  • PsyPost reports on a PLOS One study suggesting that the cats of owners experiencing psychological stress are influenced negatively by this.
  • In the new Captain Marvel movie, the titular character’s pet cat Goose is played by a team of four cats.
  • David Anderson looks at the representation of the cat in the art of ancient Egypt, in scenes both divine and domestic.
  • The Guardian reports on a new book by Peggy Gavan, looking at evidence of how the men of New York City in the late 19th and early 20th centuries loved their cats.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Niagara Falls, New York City, Winnipeg, Egyptian capital, Wuhan

  • Guardian Cities notes the utopian plan of the founder of Gillette to make Niagara Falls into a clean, hydroelectricity-fueled North American metropolis.
  • Bombardier is running into problems in supplying cars for the New York City subway, something too familiar to ex-TTC chair Andy Byford, now running the MTA. CBC reports.
  • The relative affordability of housing in Winnipeg, along with relatively high incomes, makes that city a contender. Global News reports.
  • The Economist notes the expensive and questionable plan to build a new capital for Egypt in the desert east of Cairo. Is this more about ensuring the stability of the dictatorship than creating a new metropolis?
  • Guardian Cities looks at how the Chinese metropolis of Wuhan tries to manage the threat of water.

[CAT] Five cat links: Egypt, genetics, menace, CitiKitty, PEI

  • JSTOR Daily explains how, gradually, the ancient Egyptians came to venerate cats.
  • American Veterinarian reports on the 99 Lives Cat Genome Sequencing Initiative.
  • I’m not sure quite what I think about this Jonathan Jones argument at The Guardian, about the removal of menace from the popular image of the cat. You?
  • CNBC reports on the CitiKitty potty training kit for cats.
  • Tony Davis at the Charlottetown Guardian reports on how, during the power outage, neighbours of the PEI Humane Society provided generators to keep (among others) adult cats and kittens there warm.

Written by Randy McDonald

December 1, 2018 at 11:30 am

[PHOTO] Five photos of Fayum portraits at the Met (@metmuseum)

The Metropolitan Museum of Art has a fantastic display of Fayum mummy portraits, samples of Roman portraiture preserved by the dry climate of ancient Egypt. Here, the people of the past look at us.

Portrait of a Young Woman in Red #newyork #newyorkcity #manhattan #metmuseum #egypt #fayumportraits #latergram

Young Woman with a Gilded Wreath #newyork #newyorkcity #manhattan #metmuseum #egypt #fayumportraits #latergram

Fragmentary Shroud with a Bearded Young Man #newyork #newyorkcity #manhattan #metmuseum #egypt #fayumportraits #latergram

Portrait of the Boy Eutyches #newyork #newyorkcity #manhattan #metmuseum #egypt #fayumportraits #latergram

A Man With High Coloring #newyork #newyorkcity #manhattan #metmuseum #egypt #fayumportraits #latergram

Written by Randy McDonald

June 8, 2018 at 3:30 pm

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Saint John, Hamilton, Winnipeg, Atlantic City, Cairo

  • A Casavant pipe organ in a church in Saint John, New Brunswick, is up for sale, with an uncertain future. Will it be played again? CBC reports.
  • Syrian refugees resettled in a Hamilton highrise tower have encountered bedbug-related nightmares. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Radio Canada suggests that the substantial Francophone minority in Winnipeg–the largest such community in western Canada–may have helped the city attract investment from France and Québec, here.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the disastrous experience of Atlantic City with casinos.
  • Egypt is planning to deal with congestion and pollution in its capital city of Cairo by building a new capital city. The Guardian reports.