A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘elections

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: walking on Yonge, Ford Country, Doug Ford, Finch West, Airbnb

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  • John Lorinc considers walking in Toronto, on Yonge Street, in the wake of the van attack, over at Spacing.
  • This classic Toronto Life tour of “Ford Country”, the Toronto landmarks in the career of the Ford brothers, is quite relevant in this election year.
  • Royson James is quite right to note the limit of Rob Ford’s outreach towards black and other minority youth, over at the Toronto Star.
  • blogTO reports on the start of construction of the Finch West LRT line. I sincerely hope it won’t be disrupted by election year change in the way the Eglinton subway was by the Harris government.
  • Sean Grisdale at Spacing notes the highly concentrated, and negative, impact of Airbnb on housing in downtown Toronto neighbourhoods.
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[NEWS] Five links on populism: Doug Ford and Ontario, Randy Hillier, California, Italy

  • Sabrina Nanji takes a look at the reasons why the populism of Doug Ford is doing so well this year, over at the Toronto Star.
  • Andrew MacDougall at MacLean’s argues that, to win, Doug Ford needs to find some sort of change that he can champion.
  • Edward Keenan takes a look at the (I would say) nearly ridiculous amount of rural populism Conservative MPP Randy Hillier crams into a single tweet, here at the Toronto Star.
  • John Cassidy at The New Yorker points to the many ways that California, despite Donald Trump, is pointing away from his brand of populism.
  • If, as Foreign Policy suggests, the fragmented and mercurial and populist political scene of Italy is something that will be followed by Europe if not the wider West, we will have problems.

[NEWS] Five Canada politics links: Doug Ford, Donald Trump, Buy American, Ontario vs Québec, Senate

  • Robyn Urback argues that Doug Ford needs to do more than to distinguish himself from Wynne, that he needs a positive identity among non-Ford Nation voters in his own right, over at CBC.
  • Martin Regg Cohn notes ten major points of similarity between Doug Ford and Donald Trump, as populist leaders of a certain kind, over at the Toronto Star.
  • Ontario action against Buy American policies have already reduced in reduced purchases of New York steel. Global News reports.
  • Chantal Hébert argues that while Justin Trudeau wants Liberals to remain in power in both Québec and Ontario, a Liberal loss to the PCs in Ontario would be far more damaging than a Liberal loss to CAQ in Québec. The Toronto Star has it.
  • Listening to an astonishingly ill-informed debate in the Canadian Senate on marijuana legalization made Chris Selley into someone favouring the abolition of the upper house. The National Post a href=”http://nationalpost.com/opinion/chris-selley-listening-to-debate-over-legalized-marijuana-bill-convinced-me-we-need-to-abolish-the-senate”>has it.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait suggests that strange markings in the upper atmosphere of Venus might well be evidence of life in that relatively Earth-like environment.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly raves over Babylon Berlin.
  • Centauri Dreams considers, fifty years after its publication, Clarke’s 2001.
  • Crooked Timber considers Kevin Williamson in the context of conservative intellectual representation more generally.
  • D-Brief considers “digisexuality”, the fusion of the digital world with sexuality. (I think we’re quite some way off, myself.)
  • The Dragon’s Tales considers evidence suggesting that the agricultural revolution in ancient Anatolia was achieved without population replacement from the Fertile Crescent.
  • Drew Ex Machina takes a look at the flight of Apollo 6, a flight that helped iron out problem with the Saturn V.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas is not impressed by the idea of the trolley problem, as something that allows for the displacement of responsibility.
  • Gizmodo explains why the faces of Neanderthals were so different from the faces of modern humans.
  • JSTOR Daily considers if volcano-driven climate change helped the rise of Christianity.
  • Language Log considers, after Spinoza, the idea that vowels are the souls of consonants.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money engages in a bit of speculation: What would have happened had Clinton won? (Ideological gridlock, perhaps.)
  • Lovesick Cyborg explores how the advent of the cheap USB memory stick allowed North Koreans to start to enjoy K-Pop.
  • Russell Darnley considers the transformation of the forests of Indonesia’s Riau forest from closed canopy forest to plantations.
  • The Map Room Blog shares some praise of inset maps.
  • Neuroskeptic considers how ketamine may work as an anti-depressant.
  • The NYR Daily considers student of death, Elisabeth Kübler-Ross.
  • Justin Petrone of north! shares an anecdote from the Long Island coastal community of Greenport.
  • Personal Reflection’s Jim Belshaw considers the iconic Benjamin Wolfe painting The Death of General Wolfe.
  • The Planetary Society Blog’s Casey Dreier notes cost overruns for the James Webb Space Telescope.
  • pollotenchegg maps recent trends in natural increase and decrease in Ukraine.
  • Roads and Kingdoms talks about a special Hverabrauð in Iceland, baked in hot springs.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel shares his own proposal for a new Drake Equation, revised to take account of recent discoveries.
  • Vintage Space considers how the American government would have responded if John Glenn had died in the course of his 1962 voyage into space.
  • Window on Eurasia considers the belief among many Russians that had Beria, not Khrushchev, succeeded Stalin, the Soviet Union might have been more successful.

[NEWS] Five Canadian politics links: Doug Ford, Ford vs Wynne, Ontario and Québec, John Tory, NDP

  • Will portraying Doug Ford as a bully actually be a viable strategy for his opponents?
  • Paul Wells takes a look at the contrasting policies of Kathleen Wynne and Doug Ford, each with their own set of promises, over at MacLean’s.
  • The contrast between Ontario and Québec, as their incumbent Liberal governments approach election time and their fiscal records are coming into question, is illuminating. CBC contrasts and compares.
  • I agree entirely with the idea that Mayor John Tory has to prepare Toronto for the worst coming from Queen’s Park. The Toronto Star made the case.
  • The argument of Nora Loreto that the NDP has lost the plot and, in Ontario at least, are not ready for government, makes me a NDP voter sad.

Written by Randy McDonald

April 3, 2018 at 7:45 pm

[NEWS] Five Ontario politics links: media, Doug Ford, Kathleen Wynne, progressives, real estate

  • What should Ontario’s media take from the rise of Donald Trump in the United States? How should it deal with populists? The Toronto Star reports.
  • Enzo DiMatteo at NOW Toronto looks at the plausibility of Doug Ford’s eventual election as premier of Ontario. Full circle, indeed.
  • Éric Grenier makes the point that the odds in favour of Kathleen Wynne pulling off a Liberal victory are substantially worse now than in 2014, over at CBC.
  • Bob Hepburn makes the argument that, faced with splitting the progressive vote and allowing a PC victory, the Liberals and NDP and Greens should start thinking hard. Metro Toronto has it.
  • MacLean’s notes how Doug Ford’s plans for taxation and real estate could unleash a housing bubble in Ontario, here.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: #topoli, OldTO, Quayside, coffee shops, real estate

  • Edward Keenan makes the point that, as the city prepares for elections, quotidian politics are starting to be neglected, over at the Toronto Star.
  • blogTO highlights OldTO (#oldto), a open-source and open-data version of Google Maps that maps tens of thousands of old photos to different locations across the city.
  • In a recent public meeting, Google tried to address the privacy and other concerns of others with the Sidewalk Labs involvement in the Quayside development. The Toronto Star reports.
  • This Toronto Star take on how different coffee shops deal with customers who, after buying a single coffee, proceed to take up valuable seating for extended periods is interesting. (I try to be a good customer. When is there ever too much coffee, after all?)
  • Over the year to the end of this February, real estate prices in Toronto have fallen by more than 12%. The Toronto Star reports.
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