A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘english language

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes that Betelgeuse is very likely not on the verge of a supernova, here.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the mapping of asteroid Bennu.
  • Chris Bertram at Crooked Timber reposted, after the election, a 2013 essay looking at the changes in British society from the 1970s on.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares a collection of links about the Precambrian Earth, here.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog writes about fear in the context of natural disasters, here.
  • Far Outliers reports on the problems of privateers versus regular naval units.
  • Gizmodo looks at galaxy MAMBO-9, which formed a billion years after the Big Bang.
  • io9 writes about the alternate history space race show For All Mankind.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the posters used in Ghana in the 1980s to help promote Hollywood movies.
  • Language Hat links to a new book that examines obscenity and gender in 1920s Britain.
  • Language Log looks at the terms used for the national language in Xinjiang.
  • Paul Campos at Lawyers, Guns and Money takes issue with Jeff Jacoby’s lack of sympathy towards people who suffer from growing inequality.
  • Marginal Revolution suggests that urbanists should have an appreciation for Robert Moses.
  • Sean Marshall writes, with photos, about his experiences riding a new Bolton bus.
  • Caryl Philips at the NYR Daily writes about Rachmanism, a term wrongly applied to the idea of avaricious landlords like Peter Rachman, an immigrant who was a victim of the Profumo scandal.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a paper looking at the experience of aging among people without families.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why the empty space in an atom can never be removed.
  • Strange Maps shares a festive map of London, a reindeer, biked by a cyclist.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Mongolia twice tried to become a Soviet republic.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers different birds with names starting with x.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomer considers how a stellar-mass black hole of 70 solar masses got so unaccountably huge.
  • Alex Tolley at Centauri Dreams considers the colours of photosynthesis, and how they might reveal the existence of life on exoplanets.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares some links on humans in the Paleolithic.
  • Jonathan Wynn at the Everyday Sociology Blog considers the scripts of jokes.
  • Gizmodo reports on the repurposed China-Netherlands radio telescope operating from an orbit above the far side of the Moon.
  • JSTOR Daily considers the political rhetoric of declinism.
  • Language Log considers the controversy over the future of the apostrophe.
  • James Butler at the LRB Blog notes a YouGov prediction of a Conservative majority in the UK and how this prediction is not value-neutral.
  • Marginal Revolution shares a paper from India noting how caste identities do affect the labour supply.
  • Ursula Lindsay at the NYR Daily considers if the political crisis in Lebanon, a product of economic pressures and sectarianism, might lead to a revolutionary transformation of the country away from sectarian politics.
  • Jim Belshaw at Personal Reflections looks at some of the many complicated and intermingled issues of contemporary Australia.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on the latest projects funded by the ESA.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel shares ten beautiful photos taken in 2019 by the Hubble.
  • Strange Company reports on the strange unsolved disappearance of Lillian Richey from her Idaho home in 1964.
  • Window on Eurasia shares a Russian criticism of the Ukrainian autocephalous church as a sort of papal Protestantism.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers the positive potential of homoeros.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the findings that the LISA Pathfinder satellite was impacted by hypervelocity comet fragments.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on what we have learned about interstellar comet Borisov.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes the ESA’s Matisse instrument, capable of detecting nanodiamonds orbiting distant stars.
  • Gizmodo reports a new study of the great auk, now extinct, suggesting that humans were wholly responsible for this extinction with their hunting.
  • The Island Review links to articles noting the existential vulnerability of islands like Venice and Orkney to climate change.
  • Joe. My. God. reports on the claim of Tucker Carlson–perhaps not believably retracted by him–to be supporting Russia versus Ukraine.
  • Language Hat reports on the new Indigemoji, emoji created to reflect the culture and knowledge of Aboriginal groups in Australia.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes one of the sad consequences of the American president being a liar.
  • James Butler at the LRB Blog writes about the optimism of the spending plans of Labour in the UK, a revived Keynesianism.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the exceptional cost of apartments built for homeless people in San Francisco.
  • Strange Maps looks at some remarkable gravity anomalies in parts of the US Midwest.
  • Towleroad notes the support of Jamie Lee Curtis for outing LGBTQ people who are homophobic politicians.
  • Understanding Society looks at organizations from the perspective of them as open systems.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi gives a generally positive review of the Pixel 4.
  • Arnold Zwicky notes the irony of sex pills at an outpost of British discount chain Poundland.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait observes that a team may have discovered the elusive neutron star produced by Supernova 1987A, hidden behind a cloud of dust.
  • Chris Bertram at Crooked Timber shares a photo he made via the time-consuming 19th century wet-plate collodion method.
  • Drew Ex Machina’s Andrew LePage looks at the Apollo 12 visit to the Surveyor 3 site to, among other things, see what it might suggest about future space archeology.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog looks at the story of rural poverty facing a family in Waverly, Ohio, observing how it is a systemic issue.
  • George Dvorsky at Gizmodo looks at how Mars’ Jezero crater seems to have had a past relatively friendly to life, good for the next NASA rover.
  • Joe. My. God. reports on the latest ignorance displayed by Donald Trump Jr. on Twitter, this time regarding HIV.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how Climategate was used to undermine popular opinion on climate change.
  • Language Hat links to an article explaining why so many works of classical literature were lost, among other things not making it onto school curricula.
  • Language Log shares a photo of a Muji eraser with an odd English label.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money suggests Pete Buttigieg faces a campaign-limiting ceiling to his support among Democrats.
  • The LRB Blog argues that Macron’s blocking of EU membership possibilities for the western Balkans is a terrible mistake.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a map depicting regional variations in Canada towards anthropogenic climate change. Despite data issues, the overall trend of oil-producing regions being skeptical is clear.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper examining the slowing pace of labour mobility in the US, suggesting that home attachment is a key factor.
  • Frederic Wehrey at the NYR Daily tells the story of Knud Holmboe, a Danish journalist who came to learn about the Arab world working against Italy in Libya.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why thermodynamics does not explain our perception of time.
  • Understanding Society’s Dan Little looks at Electronic Health Records and how they can lead to medical mistakes.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi shares a remarkable photo of the night sky he took using the astrophotography mode on his Pixel 4 phone.
  • Window on Eurasia shares an opinion that the Intermarium countries, between Germany and Russia, can no longer count on the US and need to organize in their self-defense.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares a photo of his handsome late partner Jacques Transue, taken as a college student.

[NEWS] Four Language Log links: Chinese, mare, Ukrainian, Yorkshire

  • Victor Mair at Language Log takes a look at the many and varied colloquialisms in the different varieties of Chinese.
  • Robert Hymes writes a guest post at Language Log examining the word “mare” and its relatives across language families.
  • Mark Liberman at Language Log considers how the name of the Ukrainian capital, Kyiv, is to be pronounced.
  • Victor Mair at Language Log takes a look at the English dialect of Yorkshire.

Written by Randy McDonald

November 23, 2019 at 11:59 pm

[NEWS] Five JSTOR Daily links: ch’arki, pisco, X-rays, lavender scare, language (@jstor_daily)

  • JSTOR Daily examines ch’arki, an Andean food like jerky.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on how Peru and Chile contest claims to being the origins of pisco.
  • JSTOR Daily explores the X-ray craze of 1896, here.
  • JSTOR Daily explores the “lavender scare” of the 1950s that saw dozens of queer men purged from the American government.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how linguists are using Urban Dictionary to study the evolution of language.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Centauri Dreams notes how gas giants on eccentric orbits can easily disrupt bodies on orbits inwards.
  • Maria Farrell at Crooked Timber suggests that the political culture of England has been deformed by the trauma experienced by young children of the elites at boarding schools.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at the haunting art of Paul Delvaux.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog looks at the work of Tressie McMillan Cottom in investigating for-profit higher education.
  • Far Outliers looks at Tripoli in 1801.
  • Gizmodo shares the Boeing design for the moon lander it proposes for NASA in 2024.
  • io9 shares words from cast of Terminator: Dark Fate about the importance of the Mexican-American frontier.
  • JSTOR Daily makes a case against killing spiders trapped in one’s home.
  • Language Hat notes a recovered 17th century translation of a Dutch bible into the Austronesian language of Siraya, spoken in Taiwan.
  • Language Log looks at the origin of the word “brogue”.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the payday lender industry.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a new biography of Walter Raleigh, a maker of empire indeed.
  • The NYR Daily looks at a new dance show using the rhythms of the words of writer Robert Walser.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at how, in a quantum universe, time and space could still be continuous not discrete.
  • Strange Company looks at a court case from 1910s Brooklyn, about a parrot that swore.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes an affirmative action court case in which it was ruled that someone from Gibraltar did not count as Hispanic.
  • Window on Eurasia notes rhetoric claiming that Russians are the largest divided people on the Earth.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at lizards and at California’s legendary Highway 101.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomy notes the mystery of distant active galaxy SDSS J163909+282447.1, with a supermassive black hole but few stars.
  • Centauri Dreams shares a proposal from Robert Buckalew for craft to engage in planned panspermia, seeding life across the galaxy.
  • The Crux looks at the theremin and the life of its creator, Leon Theremin.
  • D-Brief notes that termites cannibalize their dead, for the good of the community.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at William Burroughs’ Blade Runner, an adaptation of a 1979 science fiction novel by Alan Nourse.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes a new study explaining how the Milky Way Galaxy, and the rest of the Local Group, was heavily influenced by its birth environment.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at why the Chernobyl control room is now open for tourists.
  • Dale Campos at Lawyers. Guns and Money looks at the effects of inequality on support for right-wing politics.
  • James Butler at the LRB Blog looks at the decay and transformation of British politics, with Keith Vaz and Brexit.
  • Marginal Revolution shares a paper explaining why queens are more warlike than kings.
  • Omar G. EncarnaciĆ³n at the NYR Daily looks at how Spain has made reparations to LGBTQ people for past homophobia. Why should the United States not do the same?
  • Corey S. Powell at Out There shares his interview with physicist Sean Carroll on the reality of the Many Worlds Theory. There may be endless copies of each of us out there. (Where?)
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why 5G is almost certainly safe for humans.
  • Strange Company shares a newspaper clipping reporting on a haunting in Wales’ Plas Mawr castle.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps looks at all the different names for Africa throughout the years.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy considers, in the case of the disposal of eastern Oklahoma, whether federal Indian law should be textualist. (They argue against.)
  • Window on Eurasia notes the interest of the government of Ukraine in supporting Ukrainians and other minorities in Russia.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at syntax on signs for Sloppy Joe’s.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomy looks at ALMA’s observations of the birth of binary star system, here.
  • The Buzz, at the Toronto Public Library, announces the Governor-General’s Literary Awards from 2019, here.
  • Centauri Dreams notes how we might be able to find a wormhole at the heart of the Milky Way Galaxy.
  • The Crux commemorates the enormously successful and long-lasting Voyager missions.
  • D-Brief notes a self-tending swarm search and rescue drones.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes how the first discoveries of exoplanets were a consequence of innovative technology and thinking.
  • Steve Attewell at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that he is talking about the new idea in X-Men of a mutant nation-state over at Graphic Policy Radio.
  • The LRB Blog notes Manif pour Tous mobilizing against new human reproduction laws in France.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at how the drug war in Mexico has been getting worse.
  • Neuroskeptic considers: What traits would a human population adapted to contemporary environmental pressures exhibit?
  • The NYR Daily looks at a new exhibition of critical Internet-related art by Meriam Bennani.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at a remarkable double gravitational lens, and what it reveals about the universe.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that although half of working-age people in Uzbekistan have been educated in the Latin script, many remain fluent in Cyrillic.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers the many implications of fried pickles with ranch dressing.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomy notes a new detailed study suggesting that asteroid Hygeia is round. Does this mean it is a dwarf planet?
  • The Buzz notes that the Toronto Public Library has a free booklet on the birds of Toronto available at its branches.
  • Crooked Timber looks forward to a future, thanks to Trump, without the World Trade Organization.
  • D-Brief notes how the kelp forests off California were hurt by unseasonal heat and disease.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes an impending collision of supergalactic clusters.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog looks at how judgement can complicate collective action.
  • Language Hat looks at the different definitions of the word “mobile”.
  • Language Log looks at the deep influence of the Persian language upon Marathi.

    Marathi and Persian

  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how, if anything, climate scientists make conservative claims about their predictions.
  • Marginal Revolution wonders if planned power outages are a good way to deal with the threat of wildfires in California.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the ethnic cleansing being enabled by Turkey in Kurdish Syria.
  • Corey S. Powell at Out There interviews archeologist Arthur Lin about his use of space-based technologies to discovery traces of the past.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks at the staggering inequality in Chile, driver of the recent protests.
  • At Roads and Kingdoms, Anthony Elghossain reports from the scene of the mass protests in Lebanon.
  • Drew Rowsome tells how his balcony garden fared this year.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at stellar generations in the universe. (Our sun is a third-generation star.)
  • Strange Company looks at the murder of a girl five years old in Indiana in 1898. Was the neighbor boy twelve years old accused of the crime the culprit?
  • Denis Colombi at Une heure de peine takes a look at social mobility in France.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little considers economic historians and their study of capitalism.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the pro-Russian policies of the Moldova enclave of Gagauzia, and draws recommendations for Ukraine re: the Donbas.