A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘english language

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes that Betelgeuse is very likely not on the verge of a supernova, here.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the mapping of asteroid Bennu.
  • Chris Bertram at Crooked Timber reposted, after the election, a 2013 essay looking at the changes in British society from the 1970s on.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares a collection of links about the Precambrian Earth, here.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog writes about fear in the context of natural disasters, here.
  • Far Outliers reports on the problems of privateers versus regular naval units.
  • Gizmodo looks at galaxy MAMBO-9, which formed a billion years after the Big Bang.
  • io9 writes about the alternate history space race show For All Mankind.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the posters used in Ghana in the 1980s to help promote Hollywood movies.
  • Language Hat links to a new book that examines obscenity and gender in 1920s Britain.
  • Language Log looks at the terms used for the national language in Xinjiang.
  • Paul Campos at Lawyers, Guns and Money takes issue with Jeff Jacoby’s lack of sympathy towards people who suffer from growing inequality.
  • Marginal Revolution suggests that urbanists should have an appreciation for Robert Moses.
  • Sean Marshall writes, with photos, about his experiences riding a new Bolton bus.
  • Caryl Philips at the NYR Daily writes about Rachmanism, a term wrongly applied to the idea of avaricious landlords like Peter Rachman, an immigrant who was a victim of the Profumo scandal.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a paper looking at the experience of aging among people without families.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why the empty space in an atom can never be removed.
  • Strange Maps shares a festive map of London, a reindeer, biked by a cyclist.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Mongolia twice tried to become a Soviet republic.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers different birds with names starting with x.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomer considers how a stellar-mass black hole of 70 solar masses got so unaccountably huge.
  • Alex Tolley at Centauri Dreams considers the colours of photosynthesis, and how they might reveal the existence of life on exoplanets.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares some links on humans in the Paleolithic.
  • Jonathan Wynn at the Everyday Sociology Blog considers the scripts of jokes.
  • Gizmodo reports on the repurposed China-Netherlands radio telescope operating from an orbit above the far side of the Moon.
  • JSTOR Daily considers the political rhetoric of declinism.
  • Language Log considers the controversy over the future of the apostrophe.
  • James Butler at the LRB Blog notes a YouGov prediction of a Conservative majority in the UK and how this prediction is not value-neutral.
  • Marginal Revolution shares a paper from India noting how caste identities do affect the labour supply.
  • Ursula Lindsay at the NYR Daily considers if the political crisis in Lebanon, a product of economic pressures and sectarianism, might lead to a revolutionary transformation of the country away from sectarian politics.
  • Jim Belshaw at Personal Reflections looks at some of the many complicated and intermingled issues of contemporary Australia.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on the latest projects funded by the ESA.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel shares ten beautiful photos taken in 2019 by the Hubble.
  • Strange Company reports on the strange unsolved disappearance of Lillian Richey from her Idaho home in 1964.
  • Window on Eurasia shares a Russian criticism of the Ukrainian autocephalous church as a sort of papal Protestantism.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers the positive potential of homoeros.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the findings that the LISA Pathfinder satellite was impacted by hypervelocity comet fragments.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on what we have learned about interstellar comet Borisov.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes the ESA’s Matisse instrument, capable of detecting nanodiamonds orbiting distant stars.
  • Gizmodo reports a new study of the great auk, now extinct, suggesting that humans were wholly responsible for this extinction with their hunting.
  • The Island Review links to articles noting the existential vulnerability of islands like Venice and Orkney to climate change.
  • Joe. My. God. reports on the claim of Tucker Carlson–perhaps not believably retracted by him–to be supporting Russia versus Ukraine.
  • Language Hat reports on the new Indigemoji, emoji created to reflect the culture and knowledge of Aboriginal groups in Australia.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes one of the sad consequences of the American president being a liar.
  • James Butler at the LRB Blog writes about the optimism of the spending plans of Labour in the UK, a revived Keynesianism.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the exceptional cost of apartments built for homeless people in San Francisco.
  • Strange Maps looks at some remarkable gravity anomalies in parts of the US Midwest.
  • Towleroad notes the support of Jamie Lee Curtis for outing LGBTQ people who are homophobic politicians.
  • Understanding Society looks at organizations from the perspective of them as open systems.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi gives a generally positive review of the Pixel 4.
  • Arnold Zwicky notes the irony of sex pills at an outpost of British discount chain Poundland.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait observes that a team may have discovered the elusive neutron star produced by Supernova 1987A, hidden behind a cloud of dust.
  • Chris Bertram at Crooked Timber shares a photo he made via the time-consuming 19th century wet-plate collodion method.
  • Drew Ex Machina’s Andrew LePage looks at the Apollo 12 visit to the Surveyor 3 site to, among other things, see what it might suggest about future space archeology.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog looks at the story of rural poverty facing a family in Waverly, Ohio, observing how it is a systemic issue.
  • George Dvorsky at Gizmodo looks at how Mars’ Jezero crater seems to have had a past relatively friendly to life, good for the next NASA rover.
  • Joe. My. God. reports on the latest ignorance displayed by Donald Trump Jr. on Twitter, this time regarding HIV.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how Climategate was used to undermine popular opinion on climate change.
  • Language Hat links to an article explaining why so many works of classical literature were lost, among other things not making it onto school curricula.
  • Language Log shares a photo of a Muji eraser with an odd English label.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money suggests Pete Buttigieg faces a campaign-limiting ceiling to his support among Democrats.
  • The LRB Blog argues that Macron’s blocking of EU membership possibilities for the western Balkans is a terrible mistake.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a map depicting regional variations in Canada towards anthropogenic climate change. Despite data issues, the overall trend of oil-producing regions being skeptical is clear.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper examining the slowing pace of labour mobility in the US, suggesting that home attachment is a key factor.
  • Frederic Wehrey at the NYR Daily tells the story of Knud Holmboe, a Danish journalist who came to learn about the Arab world working against Italy in Libya.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why thermodynamics does not explain our perception of time.
  • Understanding Society’s Dan Little looks at Electronic Health Records and how they can lead to medical mistakes.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi shares a remarkable photo of the night sky he took using the astrophotography mode on his Pixel 4 phone.
  • Window on Eurasia shares an opinion that the Intermarium countries, between Germany and Russia, can no longer count on the US and need to organize in their self-defense.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares a photo of his handsome late partner Jacques Transue, taken as a college student.

[NEWS] Four Language Log links: Chinese, mare, Ukrainian, Yorkshire

  • Victor Mair at Language Log takes a look at the many and varied colloquialisms in the different varieties of Chinese.
  • Robert Hymes writes a guest post at Language Log examining the word “mare” and its relatives across language families.
  • Mark Liberman at Language Log considers how the name of the Ukrainian capital, Kyiv, is to be pronounced.
  • Victor Mair at Language Log takes a look at the English dialect of Yorkshire.

Written by Randy McDonald

November 23, 2019 at 11:59 pm

[NEWS] Five JSTOR Daily links: ch’arki, pisco, X-rays, lavender scare, language (@jstor_daily)

  • JSTOR Daily examines ch’arki, an Andean food like jerky.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on how Peru and Chile contest claims to being the origins of pisco.
  • JSTOR Daily explores the X-ray craze of 1896, here.
  • JSTOR Daily explores the “lavender scare” of the 1950s that saw dozens of queer men purged from the American government.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how linguists are using Urban Dictionary to study the evolution of language.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Centauri Dreams notes how gas giants on eccentric orbits can easily disrupt bodies on orbits inwards.
  • Maria Farrell at Crooked Timber suggests that the political culture of England has been deformed by the trauma experienced by young children of the elites at boarding schools.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at the haunting art of Paul Delvaux.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog looks at the work of Tressie McMillan Cottom in investigating for-profit higher education.
  • Far Outliers looks at Tripoli in 1801.
  • Gizmodo shares the Boeing design for the moon lander it proposes for NASA in 2024.
  • io9 shares words from cast of Terminator: Dark Fate about the importance of the Mexican-American frontier.
  • JSTOR Daily makes a case against killing spiders trapped in one’s home.
  • Language Hat notes a recovered 17th century translation of a Dutch bible into the Austronesian language of Siraya, spoken in Taiwan.
  • Language Log looks at the origin of the word “brogue”.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the payday lender industry.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a new biography of Walter Raleigh, a maker of empire indeed.
  • The NYR Daily looks at a new dance show using the rhythms of the words of writer Robert Walser.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at how, in a quantum universe, time and space could still be continuous not discrete.
  • Strange Company looks at a court case from 1910s Brooklyn, about a parrot that swore.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes an affirmative action court case in which it was ruled that someone from Gibraltar did not count as Hispanic.
  • Window on Eurasia notes rhetoric claiming that Russians are the largest divided people on the Earth.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at lizards and at California’s legendary Highway 101.