A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘english language

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly re-introduces herself to her readers.
  • Bruce Dorminey shares one man’s theory about how extraterrestrials could use exoplanet sightings to build up a galactic communications network.
  • Far Outliers shares some unusual Japanese words, starting with “amepotu” for American potato.
  • Language Hat takes</a. note of an effort to preserve the Kiowa language.
  • Did the spokeswoman of the NRA threaten to “fisk” the New York Times or threaten something else? Language Log reports.
  • Drew Rowsome notes that, compared to San Francisco, Toronto does not have much of a public kink scene.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel examines the quantum reasons behind the explosion produced by sodium metal and water.
  • Understanding Society takes rightful issue with The Guardian’s shoddy coverage of Dearborn, Michigan, and that city’s Muslims and/or Arabs.
  • Unicorn Booty notes that Canada is, at last, starting to take in queer refugees from Chechnya.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes the embarrassing support for Jean-Luc Mélenchon for Venezuela. Was opposing the US all he wanted?

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links, from the $15 wage to parking lots, cow statues, and Jamaican patois

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  • Torontoist takes on Galen Weston and the $15 minimum wage and poverty in Toronto (and Loblaw’s contribution to said).
  • At the Toronto Star, Shawn Micallef describes how high property values in Toronto discourage open-air parking lots.
  • Noor Javed looks, in Toronto Star, at the question of who authorized the cathedral elevated cow statue in Cathedraltown, in Markham.
  • The Star‘s Fatima Syed shares some old memories of Torontonians of the Centreville carousel, soon to be sold off.
  • At The Globe and Mail, Dakshana Bascaramurty takes a look at Jamaican patois, Toronto black English, and the many complex ways in which this language is received.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Charley Ross reports on an unexpected personal involvement in the disappearance of Kori Gossett. Did an informant know?
  • Citizen Science Salon reports, in the time of #sharkweek, on the sevengill sharks.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to an article on the Chinese base in Sudan.
  • Inkfish has a fascinating article describing how New Zealand’s giant black swans went extinct, and were replaced.
  • Language Hat notes two obscure words of Senegalese French, “laptot” and “signare”. What do they mean? Go see.
  • Language Log argues that the influx of English loanwords in Chinese is remarkable. Does it signal future changes in language?
  • Lawyers, Guns Money notes how Los Angeles and southern California were, during the American Civil War, a stronghold of secessionist sentiment, and runs down some of the problems of Mexico, including the militarization of crime.
  • Marginal Revolution reports on what books by which authors tend to get stolen from British bookstores.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer suggests that Donald Trump is not likely to be able to substantially reshape NAFTA.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from the recent protests in Poland against changes to the Supreme Court.
  • Understanding Society takes a look at the structure of the cities of medieval Europe, which apparently were dynamic and flexible.
  • Unicorn Booty shares some classic gay board games.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that Russia is going to try to wage a repeat of the Winter War on Ukraine.

[URBAN NOTE] Six Toronto links, from Rage and Rapture to lakeshore property to ESL and property

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  • Liisa Ladouceur’s NOW Toronto review of the Rage and Rapture tour’s stop in Toronto get it entire. Brilliant concert.
  • Emma Teitel in the Toronto Star is quite right to note that residents of the Beach complaining about unsightly commerce are so missing the point.
  • Global News reports that mosquitos which test positive for West Nile virus have been found on the flooded Toronto Islands.
  • The Toronto Islands will reopen Monday, on the first of the month, the City of Toronto announced.
  • Canada Post promises that its drivers will stop blocking bike lanes with their vehicles.
  • Metro Toronto describes how ESL learners in west-end Toronto are learning English via their concerns with affordable housing.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Anthrodendum takes a look at how surfing has been commodified.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the stellar occultation that has revealed information about MU69, the next New Horizons target.
  • Crooked Timber’s Corey Robin takes issue with Mélenchon’s take on anti-Semitism and the French role in the Holocaust.
  • D-Brief notes that we really are not good at detecting faked photos.
  • Dangerous Minds shares some vintage photos of strippers from the 1960s.
  • Michael Sacasas of The Frailest Things looks, again, at the technologically enchanted world.
  • Language Log takes issue with the dismissive treatment of “… in a woodpile.” The expression is poison.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the dual position of the camel among the Sahrawi, as wild and tame at once.
  • Neuroskeptic looks at the problems of neuroscience, statistically.
  • The NYR Daily considers the hacking of the American vote. Who did it? Who gained?
  • Science Sushi notes that climate change threats African wild dogs’ survival.
  • Window on Eurasia notes an Armenian argument that Russia lacks the soft power that the Soviet Union once enjoyed.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at some stunning imagery of the Great Red Spot of Jupiter.
  • Inkfish notes that some jumping spiders do not just look like ants, they walk like them, too.
  • Language Log has gentle fun with the trend to develop heat maps for American English dialects.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the idea of disgust as it is made to relate to the homeless.
  • Siva Vijenthira at Spacing considers the particular importance of biking for the independence of women.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers whether or not terraforming Mars is worth it. (Yes, but it will be costly.)
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that China is displacing Russia, despite the latter’s efforts, as the main trade partner of smaller post-Soviet countries.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares an amusing photo of the Wonder Bears of Provincetown.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about her vacation in Croatia’s Istria.
  • Centauri Dreams highlights the work of citizen scientists who are producing stunning images of Jupiter through Juno data.
  • Cody Delistraty examines the unique history of Paris’ Maison de Verre, a house made entirely of glass.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes a recent study suggesting red dwarfs tend to produce stellar winds stripping exo-Earths of their atmospheres.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the mechanics of press censorship in a changing Burma.
  • Language Log’s Geoff Nunberg points out that the phrase “… in the woodpile” is indelibly marked with racism.
  • The NYR Daily remembers the life and notes the death of Xiu Liaobo.
  • Pamela MacNaughtan at Roads and Kingdoms tells the story of how she found the perfect lobster roll on the Iles-de-la-Madeleine.
  • The Signal shares a provocative discussion on the potential role and future decipherability of the emoji in language.
  • Towleroad shares a comforting legal analysis suggesting that marriage equality is not yet threatened in the United States.
  • Transit Toronto notes another weekend subway shutdown, this time on the Bloor line west from Ossington.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that this year will be critical for Russia’s future relationship with Tatarstan.
  • Unicorn Booty largely approves, as do I, of the controversial recent Teen Vogue guide to anal sex. Safe sex is informed sex.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares photos of the purple-heavy gardens of his neighbourhood in California.