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Posts Tagged ‘english language

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • The Crux considers the idea that lower food consumption can lead to greater longevity.
  • D-Brief notes an English field of barley grown entirely by robots.
  • Language Hat wonders if Brexit means that EU English will start to diverge from the norms of the United Kingdom.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money shares an article taking issue with sports fans’ treatment of players.
  • The LRB Blog notes that Nicaragua has signed up to climate-change accords, leaving only the United States.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a new atlas of the Irish Revolution.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that the economy of Turkey is doing surprisingly well.
  • The Planetary Society Blog takes a look at the sorts of technology needed to survive on Mars.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the winners of the Nobel Prize in Physics, for their detection of gravitational waves.
  • Towleroad shares Mashrou’ Leila’s condemnation of Egyptian authorities for arresting people waving the rainbow flag.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes, in passing, the hard work needed to keep artificial intelligences from being racist.
  • Arnold Zwicky links to an interactive map of the bookstores of San Francisco.
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[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • At Antipope, Charlie Stross bets that barring catastrophe, the US under Trump will dispatch crewed circumlunar flights.
  • D-Brief takes a look at the evolution of birds, through speculation on how the beak formed.
  • Language Log looks at the ways Trump is represented, and mocked, in the languages of East Asia.
  • Noting the death toll in a Mexico City sweatshop, Lawyers, Guns and Money reiterates that sweatshops are dangerous places to work.
  • The NYR Daily notes the many structural issues likely to prevent foreign-imposed fixes in Afghanistan.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from a seemingly unlikely date festival held in the depths of the Saudi desert.
  • Rocky Planet reports that Mount Agung, a volcano in Indonesia, is at risk of imminent eruption.
  • Drew Rowsome notes a new stage adaptation in Toronto of the Hitchcock classic, North by Northwest.
  • Strange Company reports on how the Lonergans disappeared in 1998 in a dive off the Great Barrier Reef. What happened to them?
  • Towleroad notes how Chelsea Manning was just banned from entering Canada.
  • Window on Eurasia claims that the Russian language is disappearing from Armenia.
  • Arnold Zwicky maps the usage of “faggot” as an obscenity in the United States.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • blogTO lists some interesting things to do and see in Toronto’s American neighbour, Buffalo.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly strongly defends contemporary journalism as essential for understanding the world.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money rightly takes issue with the claim identity politics hinders the US left. Remember New Deal coalitions?
  • Marginal Revolution notes just how expensive it is to run Harvard.
  • Otto Pohl notes the upcoming 76th anniversary of the Soviet deportation of the Volga Germans.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer reports on the remarkably fluent code-switching between English and French of some Washington D.C. subway riders.
  • Strange Maps notes rival food and fabric maps of India and Pakistan.
  • Tricia Wood at Torontoist argues that, for environmental and economic reasons, Ontario needs high-speed rail.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Tatarstan has done a poor job of defending its sovereignty from the Russian government.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly re-introduces herself to her readers.
  • Bruce Dorminey shares one man’s theory about how extraterrestrials could use exoplanet sightings to build up a galactic communications network.
  • Far Outliers shares some unusual Japanese words, starting with “amepotu” for American potato.
  • Language Hat takes</a. note of an effort to preserve the Kiowa language.
  • Did the spokeswoman of the NRA threaten to “fisk” the New York Times or threaten something else? Language Log reports.
  • Drew Rowsome notes that, compared to San Francisco, Toronto does not have much of a public kink scene.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel examines the quantum reasons behind the explosion produced by sodium metal and water.
  • Understanding Society takes rightful issue with The Guardian’s shoddy coverage of Dearborn, Michigan, and that city’s Muslims and/or Arabs.
  • Unicorn Booty notes that Canada is, at last, starting to take in queer refugees from Chechnya.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes the embarrassing support for Jean-Luc Mélenchon for Venezuela. Was opposing the US all he wanted?

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links, from the $15 wage to parking lots, cow statues, and Jamaican patois

  • Torontoist takes on Galen Weston and the $15 minimum wage and poverty in Toronto (and Loblaw’s contribution to said).
  • At the Toronto Star, Shawn Micallef describes how high property values in Toronto discourage open-air parking lots.
  • Noor Javed looks, in Toronto Star, at the question of who authorized the cathedral elevated cow statue in Cathedraltown, in Markham.
  • The Star‘s Fatima Syed shares some old memories of Torontonians of the Centreville carousel, soon to be sold off.
  • At The Globe and Mail, Dakshana Bascaramurty takes a look at Jamaican patois, Toronto black English, and the many complex ways in which this language is received.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Charley Ross reports on an unexpected personal involvement in the disappearance of Kori Gossett. Did an informant know?
  • Citizen Science Salon reports, in the time of #sharkweek, on the sevengill sharks.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to an article on the Chinese base in Sudan.
  • Inkfish has a fascinating article describing how New Zealand’s giant black swans went extinct, and were replaced.
  • Language Hat notes two obscure words of Senegalese French, “laptot” and “signare”. What do they mean? Go see.
  • Language Log argues that the influx of English loanwords in Chinese is remarkable. Does it signal future changes in language?
  • Lawyers, Guns Money notes how Los Angeles and southern California were, during the American Civil War, a stronghold of secessionist sentiment, and runs down some of the problems of Mexico, including the militarization of crime.
  • Marginal Revolution reports on what books by which authors tend to get stolen from British bookstores.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer suggests that Donald Trump is not likely to be able to substantially reshape NAFTA.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from the recent protests in Poland against changes to the Supreme Court.
  • Understanding Society takes a look at the structure of the cities of medieval Europe, which apparently were dynamic and flexible.
  • Unicorn Booty shares some classic gay board games.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that Russia is going to try to wage a repeat of the Winter War on Ukraine.

[URBAN NOTE] Six Toronto links, from Rage and Rapture to lakeshore property to ESL and property

  • Liisa Ladouceur’s NOW Toronto review of the Rage and Rapture tour’s stop in Toronto get it entire. Brilliant concert.
  • Emma Teitel in the Toronto Star is quite right to note that residents of the Beach complaining about unsightly commerce are so missing the point.
  • Global News reports that mosquitos which test positive for West Nile virus have been found on the flooded Toronto Islands.
  • The Toronto Islands will reopen Monday, on the first of the month, the City of Toronto announced.
  • Canada Post promises that its drivers will stop blocking bike lanes with their vehicles.
  • Metro Toronto describes how ESL learners in west-end Toronto are learning English via their concerns with affordable housing.