A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘english language

[NEWS] Five language links: English, French, Gaelic, Cantonese, Russian

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[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Anthrodendum recommends design researcher Jan Chipchase’s Field Study Handbook for anthropologists interested in field practice.
  • Architectuul investigates strange similarities between buildings built in far-removed parts of the world.
  • Centauri Dreams takes a look at TESS, the next generation of exoplanet-hunting satellite.
  • Crooked Timber investigates the connections between the spiritualism of the 19th century and the fiction of the uncanny.
  • D-Brief notes the many names, often delightful, that newly-discovered locations on Mercury and Charon have received.
  • Cody Delistraty investigates two exhibitions of French satirists, including Charlie Hedo’s Georges Wolinski, to examine the nature of satire.
  • The Dragon’s Tales considers the possibility of cryomagna leaving marks on the surface of Europa.
  • Drew Ex Machina takes a look at the strangely alien skies of TRAPPIST-1e. What would its sun look like? How would the other planets appear?
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at the new prominence of multigenerational households in the United States. While a response to economic strains, it also looks back to past traditions.
  • Hornet Stories notes how, on RuPaul’s Drag Race, Monet X Change gave a decent explanation behind the surprisingly recent birth of the modern British accent.
  • Imageo notes how a massive blob of warm water is rising to the surface of the Pacific.
  • At In A State of Migration, Lyman Stone explores the unique population history of Maine, to my eyes easily the most Atlantic Canadian of the fifty American states.
  • JSTOR Daily links to a paper exploring why modern video games can produce such rewarding experiences for players. (We can get meaning from many places.)
  • Language Log takes a look at the complexity of Chinese language classifications with a song by Yishi Band. What exactly is Yibin Sichuanese?
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money takes a look at an interesting question: When did Jews in the United States become white?
  • The LRB Blog takes a look at the baffling reasons behind the poisoning of the Skribins with Novichok, and the science behind it.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that this year, GDP per capita measured at PPP in Spain is higher than in Italy. (This probably says more about the disarray in Italy.)
  • The NYR Daily shares an interesting interview with cartoonist Art Spiegelman.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw tells of his experiences on a trip to the small Australian city of Armidale, in the region of New England.
  • Justin Petrone reflects on the tidy and clean, minimalist even, rural landscape of Estonia.
  • Progressive Download’s John Farrell notes brain scans that provide evidence of consciousness even in very young infants.
  • Drew Rowsome praises the Toronto production of the musical Fun Home, based on the Alison Bechdel graphic novel. I, for one, can’t wait to see it.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that, although Proxima Centauri is far too active a star for Proxima Centauri b to be Earth-like, that world could still plausibly host life-supporting environments.
  • Ilya Somin at the Volokh Conspiracy suggests a recent deal at the federal level in the US between Trump and Cory Gardner has created space for states to legalize marijuana without fear of federal intervention.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • D-Brief notes that global climate change seems already to have altered the flow of the ocean current system including the Gulf Stream.
  • JSTOR Daily takes a look at the dialect, and cultural forms, of American loggers.
  • Taika Waititi, director of (among other movies) Thor: Ragnarok, has created controversy by talking about racism in his native New Zealand. (Good for him, I’d say.) Lawyers, Guns and Money reports.
  • Marginal Revolution takes a look at a strange public apology by a Chinese company, and what this says about Chinese politics.
  • Strange Maps’ Frank Jacobs shared this map depicting the many ephemeral states that appeared in the former Russian Empire after the October Revolution.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel makes the point that there are very good reasons to believe in dark matter and dark energy, that these concepts are not just a latter-day version of the aether.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the many ways in which the Siberian republic of Tuva is a political anomaly in Russia.
  • At Worthwhile Canadian Initiative, Frances Woolley uses data from the National Graduates Survey to take a look at student regret in Canadian universities. To what extent does it exist? What disciplines is it concentrated in?

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Kambiz Kamrani at Anthropology.net notes that the more Neanderthal DNA gets sequenced, the more we know of this population’s history.
  • Anthro{dendum} takes a look at anthropologists who use their knowledge and their access to other cultures for purposes of espionage.
  • Crooked Timber tackles the question of immigration from another angle: do states have the authority to control it, for starters?
  • Dangerous Minds shares a fun video imagining Netflix as it might have existed in 1995.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog considers how the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico is an instance of American state failure.
  • The Frailest Thing’s L.M. Sacasas considers is vows to abandon Facebook are akin to a modern-day vow of poverty.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at Queer Eye for the Straight Guy and why it still matters.
  • Language Log considers the naming practices of new elements like Nihonium.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money suggests that, based on the stagnation of average incomes in the US as GDP has growth, capitalism can be said to have failed.
  • Lingua Franca considers the origin of the phrase “bad actor.”
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper suggesting that the American opioid epidemic is not simply driven by economic factors.
  • The NYR Daily considers how Poland’s new history laws do poor service to a very complicated past.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw has an interesting post examining the settlement of Australisa’s inland “Channel Country” by cattle stations, chains to allow herds to migrate following the weather.
  • The Planetary Science Blog’s Emily Lakdawalla takes a look at the latest science on famously volcanic Io.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel examines how the Milky Way Galaxy is slowly consuming its neighbours, the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Centauri Dreams shares a proposal for unmanned probe missions to future incoming extrasolar asteroids like ‘Oumuamua.
  • The Crux considers, in the context of recent (perhaps surprising) context, how scientists will one day record dreams.
  • Hornet Stories shares the report on a poll of younger gay people about the idea of monogamous relations versus open ones, suggesting there are signs a strong preference for monogamy isn’t well thought out.
  • Imageo notes that global warming, by leading to the breakup of icecaps, will worsen the sea ice hazard to maritime shipping.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how social workers are called to support serious social reform.
  • Language Hat notes a monument to the Cyrillic alphabet erected in Antarctica by Bulgarians.
  • In the era of Trump, Lingua Franca takes a look at the origin of the phrase “useful idiots”.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a recent article observing the decline of German cuisine in the United States. Who, or what, will save it?
  • At the Planetary Society Blog, Emily Lakdawalla talks about the latest exciting discoveries from Titan, including the odd distribution of nitrogen in its atmosphere and surface.
  • Towleroad notes how the discomfort of Ben Carson with transgender people leads him to consider the needs of homeless transgender people as secondary to this discomfort.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that Cossacks in Russia are close to gaining recognition as a separate people.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell suggests–jokes?–that intellectual history from 1900 can be explained substantially in terms of the uncritical adoption of a nomad science, starting from race science and continuing to today with Harry Potter.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares a post reporting on a PhD student’s thesis, studying features of Chicano English.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares some stunning photos of the polar regions of Jupiter, from Juno.
  • Centauri Dreams notes speculation on how antimatter could be harnessed for space propulsion.
  • D-Brief notes how nanotechnological design is used to create tools capable of extracting water from the air above the Atacama.
  • Russell Darnley notes the continuing peat fires in Sumatra’s Riau Province.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes evidence of an ancient cultural diffusion, from Copper Age Iberia, apparently not accompanied by gene flows.
  • Mark Graham links to a paper he co-authored looking at the viability of online work as an option, or not, in the Global South.
  • Hornet Stories notes an upcoming documentary about Harlem fashion figure Dapper Dan.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the surprising controversy around the practice of keeping crickets as pets, for entertainments including music and bloodsports.
  • Language Log looks at the extent to which Xi Jinping actually has been identified as a Tibetan bodhisattva.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the extent to which Mexican society has also experienced negative effects from NAFTA, in ways perhaps not unfamiliar to Americans.
  • Lingua Franca considers the usage of the term “blockbuster”.
  • Neuroskeptic notes a new paper suggesting there is no neurogenesis in adult humans.
  • The NYR Daily features an eyewitness description of a botched execution in Alabama. This one does indeed seem to be particularly barbaric.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes the rise of dictatorship worldwide.
  • Roads and Kingdoms <U?considers the simple joys of chilaquiles sandwiches in Guadalajara.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the vast bumber of starless planets, rogue planets, out there in the universe.
  • Worthwhile Canadian Initiative notes the fact, and the political import of the fact, that public-sector wages in Ontario are higher than private-sector ones.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the continuing decline of the Russian village, not helped by recent changes in policy under Putin.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes the difference, in business, between pre- and post-funding investments.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes that the measured rate of the expansion of the universe depends on the method used to track this rate, and that this is a problem.
  • On Sunday, Caitlin Kelly celebrated receiving her annual cheque from Canada’s Public Lending Program, which gives authors royalties based on how often their book has been borrowed in our public libraries.
  • In The Buzz, the Toronto Public Library identified five books in its collection particularly prone to be challenged by would-be censors.
  • D-Brief suggests that, if bacteria managed to survive and adapt in the Atacama desert as it became hostile to life, like life might have done the same on Mars.
  • Far Outliers notes the crushing defeat, and extensive looting of, the MOghul empire by the Persia of Nader Shah.
  • Hornet Stories looks at the medal hauls of out Olympic athletes this year in Pyeongchang.
  • Imageo notes satellite imagery indicating that fisheries occupy four times the footprint of agriculture. Aquaculture is starting to look like a necessary idea, I think.

  • At In Media Res, Russell Arben Fox praises Porch Fires, a new biography of Laura Ingalls Wilder by Caroline Fraser, for its insights on Wilder and on the moment of the settlement of the American West.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how, in the 19th century after the development of anesthesia, the ability to relieve people of pain was a political controversy. Shouldn’t it be felt, wasn’t it natural?
  • Language Hat links to an article taking a look behind the scenes at the Oxford English Dictionary. How does it work? What are its challenges?
  • At Lingua Franca, Roger Shuy distinguishes between different kinds of speech events and explains why they are so important in the context of bribery trials.
  • The LRB Blog shares some advice on ethics in statecraft from the 2nd century CE Chinese writer Liu An.
  • J. Hoberman at the NYR Daily reviews an exhibit of the work of Bauhaus artist Jozef Albers at the Guggenheim.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares an anecdote of travellers drinking homemade wine in Montenegro.
  • Drew Rowsome interviews Native American drag queen and up-and-coming music star Vizin.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains how star S0-2, orbiting so close to the black hole at the heart of the Milky Way Galaxy, will help prove Einsteinian relativity.
  • Vintage Space explains, for the record, how rockets can work in a vacuum. (This did baffle some people this time last century.)
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that, on its 100th anniversary, Estonia has succeeded in integrating most of its Russophones.