A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘english language

[NEWS] Five links about ethnic conflict: language in Canada, wilderness, Catalonia, Czechs on Tibet

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  • CBC notes that major First Nations languages in Canada like Cree and Ojibwe may soon be supported by translators in the Canadian Parliament in Ottawa.
  • Julian Brave NoiseCat at VICE argues against an imagining of wilderness that imagines territories without indigenous peoples. Such too readily can enable abuse of the natural world.
  • Bloomberg notes how the Spanish authorities in Catalonia have overriden local governments and populations by transferring dispute art objects to a different Spanish region. This won’t end well.
  • Transitions Online notes how traditionally strong Czech support for Tibet and Tibetan exiles has been fading in recent years, with China becoming a bigger player.
  • Paul Wells at MacLean’s takes a look at what might be the latest round of the language debate in Montréal. How important are greetings? (I think, for the record, they might be more important than Wells argues.)
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[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait answers the question of why asteroids tend to explode high in atmosphere.
  • Centauri Dreams carries Keith Cooper’s suggestion that METI activists should wait until the first generation of detailed exoplanet investigations give an idea as to what is out there before they begin transmitting.
  • The Crux notes how indigenous peoples in Guyana use drones to defend their land claims.
  • JSTOR Daily summarizes an article on the sexually radical and politically progressive Kansas freethinkers, subject even to death threats.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog considers the question of who benefits from automotion in early 21st century society.
  • Far Outliers notes how, in the Second World War, American missionaries also became interrogators thanks to their knowledge.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas, linking to an article on #elsagate, notes how many video creators were making content not for human audiences but rather to please YouTube algorithms.
  • Language Log deals with one manifestation of the controversy over the use of “they” as a gender-neutral first-person singular pronoun.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the terribly suspicious denial of anti-Semitism from Roy Moore’s wife. Alabamans, vote against this man.
  • The LRB Blog shares Gill Partington’s examination of some modern art exhibits dealing with the mechanics of reading.
  • Russell Darnley of maximos62 examines how Human Rights Day, celebrating the Universal Declaration of Human Rights signed on 10 December 1948, is not the only important date in international human rights history.
  • The NYR Daily notes how Donald Trump’s actions have only worsened the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
  • Cheri Lucas Rowlands shares beautiful photos from a visit to England.
  • Spacing shares an article by Sean Ruthen examining the dynamic difference of the different cities of Italy, based on the author’s recent trip there.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at how young massive black hole J1342+0928 poses a challenge.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the main demographic challenges for the Baltic States these days are not so much ethnic conflicts but rather population aging and emigration.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at timeless similarities between classics of homoerotic art and modern-day gay photography. NSFW, obviously.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about two days recently spent in Washington D.C. I would like to go there myself, I think, and for more than a quick bus transfer in the night.
  • Crooked Timber considers what the upper classes of the United States are getting from the new tax cuts.
  • Daily JSTOR considers the ethics of having the art of Banksy displayed in the occupied West Bank. Is it ethical?
  • Far Outliers notes the impact of missionary organizations on the US Peace Corps.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas notes that the “we” used in talk about technology does not include everyone, that it is a selective “we.”
  • Imageo shares satellite imagery of the Arctic suggesting this winter in North America will be a harsh one.
  • Language Hat links to an article noting the dialect of English that refugees on the Greek island of Lesbos have developed.
  • The LRB Blog shares a report of a visit to the Estonian National Museum, and a reflection on the mythology of nationhood.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper claiming legalized abortion, not birth control, played the leading role in the emancipation of American women.
  • The NYR Daily notes the cult of personality surrounding Obama.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders what happened to the Afro-Argentines, numerous until the 19th century.
  • Drew Rowsome notes a reading of the classic gay Canadian play Fortune and Men’s Eyes, scheduled for the 11th at Buddies in Bad Times.
  • Window on Eurasia links to a scholarly examination of the Soviet annexation of once-independent Tannu Tuva, back in 1944.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Centauri Dreams considers, in the context of ‘Oumuamua, the import of shads and axis ratios. What does it suggest about the processes by which planetary systems form?
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes a report suggesting that Russia is not at all likely to legalize bitcoins.
  • At A Fistful of Euros, Alex Harrowell takes a look at Article 63, the German constitutional article that governs the selection of the Chancellor.
  • The Frailest Thing quotes a passage from Jacques Ellul about the adaptation of humans to a mechanized world.
  • Hornet Stories notes that out actor Russell Tovey is set to play the (also out) Ray in the Arrowverse, an anti-Nazi superhero from an alternate Earth.
  • Language Hat tells the story of Lin Shu, an early 20th century translator of European fiction into Chinese whose works were remarkably influential.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money is amused by the story of a young university student who has used basic knowledge of Foucault to play with his family’s household rules.
  • The LRB Blog notes the very awkward, and potentially fatal, position of the Rohingya, caught between Burma and Bangladesh.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a talk recently given on fake maps, on maps used to lie and misrepresent and propagandize.
  • The NYR Daily meditates on the precocity and the homoeroticism inherent in the Hart Crane poem “The Bridge.”
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that we can see, so far, only a surprisingly small fraction of the observable universe. (So far.)
  • The Volokh Conspiracy celebrates the many defeats of Trump as he fights against sanctuary cities as a victory for federalism and against executive power.
  • Window on Eurasia notes a poll suggesting that, after 2014, while Crimeans may feel less Ukrainian they do not necessarily feel more Russian.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look, linguistically, at an Ian Frazier phrase: “That is aliens for you.”

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • James Bow shares a deeply personal memory about a streetcar stop by Queens Quay where his life was recently transformed.
  • D-Brief notes that antimatter is one byproduct of lightning. (Really.)
  • Daily JSTOR counsels against buying into the scam of “authenticity.”
  • Language Hat shares a 2005 essay by Patricia Palmer, talking about how the spread of English was intimately linked with imperialism, first in Ireland then overseas.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money is strongly against Black Friday.
  • The NYR Daily notes that Donald Trump’s hardline policies are not going to help bring about change in Cuba.
  • Out There talks about how we are able to be pretty sure that interstellar asteorid ‘Oumuamua is not an extraterrestrial artifact.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer tries to imagine, economically, what an American Ontario would be like.
  • Roads and Kingdoms talks about some good local beer enjoyed in Chiapas.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel shares a list of ten scientific phenomena we should be thankful for, if we want to exist.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares a photo of his Christmas bell flowering maple.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • blogTO shares a raft of photos from Toronto in the 1910s.
  • Daily JSTOR notes the profound democratic symbolism of the doughnut. Seriously.
  • D-Brief notes a contentious argument that organic agriculture could, if well-managed, be productive enough to feed the population of the world.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a study of the complex environment of dust and debris around young protostar L1527.
  • Far Outliers notes the central role of Hitler in avoiding the crushing of the BEF at Dunkirk. Apparently the British Empire and the Catholic Church were the two world forces he did not wish to crush.
  • Hornet Stories makes the perfectly obvious point that websites which collect photos of attractive guys taken without their consent are actually sketchy, legally and ethically. Why it has to be made, I don’t know.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money takes time from providing political coverage to share a recipe for a delicious-sounding slow-cooker corn/salmon/bacon chowder.
  • The Map Room Blog notes the updated looks of Google Maps.
  • The NYR Daily examines the ad hoc and DIY nature of disaster relief on Puerto Rico post-Maria.
  • Seriously Science notes a paper suggesting that bearded men tend to be more sexist than non-bearded men.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel cautions against a tendency to pick up on astronomical mysteries as proof of dark matter’s existence.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that wealthy Russians are quietly shifting their wealth and investing in property in Europe.
  • Arnold Zwicky notes a new effort to employ the principles of Basic English, conveying as much meaning as possible with as few worlds as imaginable.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • The Crux considers the idea that lower food consumption can lead to greater longevity.
  • D-Brief notes an English field of barley grown entirely by robots.
  • Language Hat wonders if Brexit means that EU English will start to diverge from the norms of the United Kingdom.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money shares an article taking issue with sports fans’ treatment of players.
  • The LRB Blog notes that Nicaragua has signed up to climate-change accords, leaving only the United States.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a new atlas of the Irish Revolution.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that the economy of Turkey is doing surprisingly well.
  • The Planetary Society Blog takes a look at the sorts of technology needed to survive on Mars.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the winners of the Nobel Prize in Physics, for their detection of gravitational waves.
  • Towleroad shares Mashrou’ Leila’s condemnation of Egyptian authorities for arresting people waving the rainbow flag.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes, in passing, the hard work needed to keep artificial intelligences from being racist.
  • Arnold Zwicky links to an interactive map of the bookstores of San Francisco.