A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘environment

[NEWS] Four science links: Neanderthals, oceans and computers, Brazil rainforest, water on Vesta

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  • Neanderthals, like contemporary humans, had the sort of prolonged childhoods which lend themselves to intelligence. National Geographic reports.
  • The cool chill water of oceans is starting to be used to cool data centres. VICE reports.
  • Brazil is set to embark on a substantial process to restore Amazonian rainforest. VICE reports.
  • The Dawn probe found evidence of subsurface ice on rocky asteroid-belt protoplanet Vesta. Universe Today reports.
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[NEWS] Four environment links: disasters, Tibetan soil flowing, lobsters, flooding

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  • Naomi Klein argues that this summer, of wildfires and disasters, marks an environmental turning point.
  • National Geographic shares stunning video of defrosting Tibetan soil flowing.
  • This dumping of illegally harvested lobsters as garbage on land in Nova Scotia is a terrible waste. CBC reports.
  • Can we limit urban flooding only if we force landowners to contribute to the costs of stormwater infrastructure? MacLean’s makes the case.

Written by Randy McDonald

September 19, 2017 at 10:45 pm

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Centauri Dreams celebrates the science behind Cassini.
  • Crooked Timber’s Henry Farrell is breaking from Harvard’s Kennedy Centre over its revocation of an invitation to Chelsea Manning.
  • The Crux points to the ways in which the legacy of Cassini will still be active.
  • D-Brief notes that some tool-using macaques of Thailand are overfishing their environment.
  • Hornet Stories notes the eulogy given by Hillary Clinton at the funeral of Edie Windsor.
  • Inkfish notes one way to define separate bird species: ask the birds what they think. (Literally.)
  • The LRB Blog notes the recent passing of Margot Hielscher, veteran German star and one-time crush of Goebbels.
  • The NYR Daily notes the chilling effects on discourse in India of a string of murders of Indian journalists and writers.
  • At the Planetary Science Blog, Emily Lakdawalla bids farewell to the noble Cassini probe.
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes a breakfast in Bangladesh complicated by child marriage.
  • Towleroad notes an Australian church cancelled an opposite-sex couple’s wedding because the bride supports equality.
  • Arnold Zwicky notes the marmots of, among other places, cosmopolitan and multilingual Swiss canton of Graubünden.

[URBAN NOTE] Four Toronto notes: Gibraltar Point, Centreville carousel, condo designss, Estonians

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  • NOW Toronto notes how Gibraltar Point marks the Toronto Islands’ point most vulnerable to erosion.
  • It seems, as Fatima Syed notes, that the Centreville carousel will not be bought by its intended buyer.
  • VICE reports on a young Toronto architect who suggests condos could be more affordable if they were more modular.
  • A highly disproportionate number of Toronto’s innovative post-war architects were Estonian refugees. Stunning works. The Globe and Mail reports.

[URBAN NOTE] Five links: Toronto affordable housing, public art, Montréal flag, co-housing, Islands

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  • Building two thousand affordable housing units in Toronto is a nice step forward. Will there be more steps? The Toronto Star reports.
  • This charming bit of improvised art down at Humber Bay Park reminds me that I really need to head down there. From the Toronto Star.
  • Montréal has stopped representing genocidal General Amherst on its flag, replacing it with a native pine tree. The National Post reports.
  • Emily Macrae at Torontoist suggests co-housing, drawn from a Québec model, is something Toronto might want to look into.
  • Richard Longley at NOW Toronto explores the Toronto Islands. Do they have a future? What will they need?

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Centauri Dreams considers the idea of uploading a digital “Golden Record” into the memory of New Horizons.
  • Crooked Timber takes a look at American legal writer (and judge) Richard Posner’s embrace of pragmatism. What does it mean?
  • D-Brief notes the rapid melting of the glaciers that feed the major rivers of Asia.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper considering ways to detect planets in orbit of red giants.
  • The LRB Blog considers the potential for political tumult in Saudi Arabia, in the wake of arrests and rumours.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a new gravity map of Mars, revealing the crust of that world to be less dense and more variable than thought.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the South China Sea dispute in the wake of Indonesia’s newly restated claims.
  • Roads and Kingdoms looks at Philadelphia’s seasonal cookie–spiced wafer–wars.
  • Drew Rowsome is a big fan of the movie adaptation of It.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that, for want of better options, the Donbas republics’ people might return to Ukraine.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares stunning deep-field pictures of intergalactic space.
  • Centauri Dreams shares the second part of Larry Klaes’ analysis of Forbidden Planet.
  • D-Brief suggests that controlled kangaroo hunting may be necessary for the ecological health of Australia.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes a new radio telescope in British Columbia that may help solve the mystery of fast radio burst.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes that quasars can irradiate a noteworthy fraction of potentially Earth-like planets.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money comes out against the idea of giving Amazon massive tax breaks for HQ2.
  • The LRB Blog bids a fond farewell to Saturn probe Cassini.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper suggesting new ideas–hence, new sources of economic growth–are harder to come by.
  • Maximos62 recounts a quietly chilling trip to East Timor where he discovers a landscape marked by genocide.
  • The New APPS Blog is quite unsurprised by news that Russians may have used Facebook to manipulate the US election.
  • At Out of Ambit, Diane Duane bids a fond farewell to colleague Len Wein.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw does not think Australia is committed enough to affordable housing to solve homelessness Finland-style.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from the Suwalki Gap, the thin corridor joining the Baltic States to Poland.
  • Peter Rukavina looks at how a storied land rover was recovered from St. Helena.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel lists the top six discoveries of Cassini at Saturn.
  • Towleroad notes fundamentally misaimed criticism of new AI that determines sexual orientation from facepics.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at contemporary Russian fears about the power of rising China in Russia’s Asian territories.