A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘ethnic conflict

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: Fredericton, Amsterdam, Athens, Barcelona, Riga

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  • The city of Fredericton hopes a new strategy to attracting international migration to the New Brunswick capital will help its grow its population by 25 thousand. Global News reports.
  • Guardian Cities notes the controversy in Amsterdam as users of moped find themselves being pushed from using bike lanes.
  • Guardian Cities looks at how many in Athens think the city might do well to unbury the rivers covered under concrete and construction in the second half of the 20th century.
  • The Sagrada Familia, after more than 130 years of construction, has finally received a permit for construction from Barcelona city authorities. Global News reports.
  • Evan Gershkovich at the Moscow Times reports on how the recent ousting of the mayor of the Latvian capital of Riga for corruption is also seem through a lens of ethnic conflict.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomy Phil Plait notes that the location of the Apollo 12 Ascent Module on the Moon may have been found.
  • Kieran Healy writes about how he uses scripts to produce animated graphics illustrating charging patterns of baby names over the 20th century in the United States.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how Japan has been cleaning up Tohoku after the Fukushima disaster.
  • Language Hat looks at an upcoming book project taking a look at how different languages written in the Arabic script interact with each other.
  • Abigail Nussbaum at Lawyers, Guns and Money, looking at “The Bells”, makes the case that this episode’s solution to the issues of Daenerys was probably the best one that could be devised within Game of Thrones’ self-imposed limitations.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the trial in Israeli military courts of Palestinian activist Issa Amro.
  • Jason C. Davis notes at the Planetary Society Blog that the Lightsail 2 spacecraft is scheduled for a June launch.
  • Peter Rukavina reacts, with eventual cool printings, to the Fluxus movement in mid-20th century art.
  • Strange Company shares the story of pioneering Edwardian parachustist Dolly Shepherd.
  • Daniel Little at Understanding Society shares his 1970s proposal for a Marxist philosophy of the social sciences.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that the GULAG system was a net loss for the Soviet economy, costly and employing workers at low productivity levels. (Bringing it back would be a mistake, then.)
  • Arnold Zwicky shares some wonderful photos of some remarkable lilies.

[URBAN NOTE] Seven city links: Montréal, Camden, Derry, Rome, Cape Town, Hong Kong, Dhaka & Calcutta

  • La Presse notes that the Bixi bike-sharing service in Montréal is celebrating its 11th anniversary.
  • Marginal Revolution notes how better policing cut into crime in Camden, New Jersey.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how Brexit and a hardened border will hit the Northern Ireland city of Derry.
  • Guardian Cities reports on the gang that goes around Rome at night making illegal repairs to crumbling infrastructure.
  • CityLab reports on how Cape Town is coping, one year after it nearly ran out of water.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares tips for travellers visiting Hong Kong.
  • Guardian Cities reports on the families made refugees by Partition who tried to swap homes in Dhaka and Calcutta.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shows four different images of nearby stellar nursery NGC 1333.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the hot Saturn TOI-197, and the way it was detected.
  • D-Brief notes how galaxy NGC-1052 DF2 has been confirmed as the second galaxy apparently lacking in dark matter.
  • Gizmodo notes new confirmation, from an orbiting probe, that Curiosity detected methane emanating from Mars back in 2013.
  • Hornet Stories tries to correct some misconceptions about the Burning Man festival.
  • The Island Review links to a New York Times profile of post-Maria Puerto Rico.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Martin Shkreli has been tossed into solitary confinement.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the work of psychologists in the 1930s US who profiled individuals who did not fit the gender binary. Would these people have identified themselves as trans or non-binary now?
  • The LRB Blog notes the fondness of Jacob Rees-Mogg for extreme-right German politicians from the AfD.
  • Language Log shares a written ad in Cantonese from Hong Kong.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money compares China now to the Untied States of the past, and finds interesting correspondences.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the deep and significant commitment of China under Mao to providing foreign aid.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the complex, once-overlooked, life and career of Charlotte Perkins Gilman, writer of “The Yellow Wallpaper”.
  • Out There notes that, while dark matter is certainly real, “dark matter” is a poor name for this mysterious substance.
  • Jason Davis at the Planetary Society Blog considers the challenges to be faced by Hayabusa 2 when it fires a sampling probe into asteroid Ryugu.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers how into the universe a spaceship could travel if it accelerated consistently at one gravity.
  • Strange Company examines the life and adventures of Jeffrey Hudson, a royal dwarf in 17th century England.
  • Daniel Little at Understanding Society builds on the work of V.K. Ramachandran in considering the ethics of development ethnography.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the new identification of Azerbaijanis as victims of genocide by neighbours, and what this means for the relations of Azerbaijan.
  • Arnold Zwicky has fun, in a NSFW fanfic way, with figures from comics contemporary and old.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • At Anthro{dendum}, Travis Cooper shares thoughts o what should be kept in mind in studying new media.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes a new plan to catalogue a hundred thousand stellar nurseries in nearby galaxies.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the very unusual lightcurve of the star VVV-WIT-07.
  • D-Brief considers the possible role of climate change in undermining Byzantium.
  • Gizmodo reports on how astronomers managed to directly image exoplanet HR8799e, a young hot Jupiter some 130 light-years away.
  • JSTOR Daily examines the lynchings inflicted on people of Mexican background in the conquered American West after the Mexican-American War.
  • Marginal Revolution considers the possibility that homo sapiens might trace its ancestry to hominid populations in southern Africa.
  • Noahpinion features a guest post from Roy Bahat arguing that Uber and Lyft need to change their treatment of their workers for their own good.
  • The NYR Daily features an article by Zia Haider Rahman talking about the many ways in which British identity has mutated after Brexit.
  • The Planetary Society Blog features some photos taken by the Beresheet probe on its way to the Moon.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the Greg Scarnici book Dungeons & Drag Queens, a funny take on Fire Island.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the early Solar System, when a still energetic Mars existed alongside Earth as a life-supporting planet. (Venus, not so much. Perhaps?)
  • Daniel Little writes at Understanding Society about his new book project, a social ontology of government.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Russia is dropping off sharply in importance as a trading partner for most post-Soviet states.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait shares Johannes Kroeger’s image of the median Earth.
  • The Crux considers when human societies began to accumulate large numbers of aged people. Would there have been octogenarians in any Stone Age cultures, for instance?
  • The Dragon’s Tales considers Russia’s strategy in Southeast Asia.
  • Alexandra Samuel at JSTOR Daily notes that one way to fight against fake news is for people to broaden their friends networks beyond their ideological sympathizers.
  • Language Log, noting a television clip from Algeria in which a person defend their native dialect versus standard Arabic, compares the language situation in the Arab world to that of China.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen explains how the Tervuren Central African museum in Brussels has not been decolonized.
  • The Planetary Society Blog explores the ice giants, Uranus and Neptune.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why, in current physics, the multiverse must exist.
  • Strange Company explores the strange disappearance, in the Arizona desert in 1952, of a young couple. Their plane was found and in perfect condition, but what happened to them?
  • Strange Maps reports on the tragic migration of six Californian raptors, only one of which managed to make it to its destination.
  • Towleroad reports on the appearance of actor and singer Ben Platt on The Ellen Show, talking about his career and coming out.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the apparently widespread mutual dislike of Chechens and Muscovites.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers the French Impressionist artists Pierre Puvis de Chavannes and Suzanne Valadon, with images of their art.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes how the dinosaurs seem to have been killed off 65 million years ago by a combination of geological and astronomical catastrophes.
  • Centauri Dreams examines Kepler 1658b, a hot Jupiter in a close orbit around an old star.
  • The Crux reports on the continuing search for Planet Nine in the orbits of distant solar system objects.
  • D-Brief notes how researchers have begun to study the archaeological records of otters.
  • Cody Delistraty profiles author and journalist John Lanchester.
  • Far Outliers reports on the terrible violence between Hindus and Muslims preceding partition in Calcutta.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing suggests the carnival of the online world, full of hidden work, is actually an unsatisfying false carnival.
  • Hornet Stories reports that São Paulo LGBTQ cultural centre and homeless shelter Casa 1 is facing closure thanks to cuts by the homophobic new government.
  • io9 reports on one fan’s attempt to use machine learning to produce a HD version of Deep Space Nine.
  • JSTOR Daily takes a look at the increasing trend, at least in the United States and the United Kingdom, to deport long-term residents lacking sufficiently secure residency rights.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the literally medieval epidemics raging among the homeless of California.
  • Marginal Revolution considers how the Book of Genesis can be read as a story of increasing technology driving improved living standards and economic growth.
  • The NYR Daily interviews Lénaïg Bredoux about #MeToo in France.
  • The Planetary Society Blog considers the subtle differences in colour between ice giants Uranus and Neptune, one greenish and the other a blue, and the causes of this difference.
  • The Speed River Journal’s Van Waffle shares beautiful photos of ice on a stream as he talks about his creative process.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers what the universe was like back when the Earth was forming.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on a statement made by the government of Belarus that the survival of the Belarusian language is a guarantor of national security.
  • Arnold Zwicky was kind enough to share his handout for the semiotics gathering SemFest20.