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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘exoplanets

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Nathan Burgoine at Apostrophen argues compellingly that stories featuring queer protagonists should also have other queer characters (among other things).
  • James Bow talks about the origins and the progress of his new novel, The Sun Runners.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the recent hopeful analysis of Ross 128b, still a strong candidate for a relatively Earth-like world.
  • Crooked Timber starts a discussion on having elections in the European Parliament being based on transnational lists.
  • D-Brief notes a hauntingly musical study of the plasma of Saturn’s ring system.
  • Hornet Stories reports on N.K. Jemisin’s article that bigots are not good writers of fiction. I’m inclined to agree: People who cannot imagine the lives of others as legitimate have issues with plausible characterization.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Nicola Sturgeon opened Pride in Glasgow on the same day as Trump’s visit, saying there was where she wanted to be regardless.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the winding history of New York State’s Adirondacks, as a protected area.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the evidence for the unwitting involvement of Glenn Greenwald and Wikileaks as agents of Russia in support of Trump.
  • Lingua Franca, at the Chronicle, considers the genesis of the phrase “Sherpas of the Beltway.” How problematic is it?
  • Marginal Revolution suggests that Canadian public opinion in support of open immigration rests on borders being controlled.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that the strange behaviour of Boyajian’s Star can be explained by dust alone.
  • Window on Eurasia speculates that Russia might be on the verge of another wave of regional reorganizations, amalgamating some provinces and other territories into others.
  • Arnold Zwicky points out the achievements of Samantha Allen, a journalist writing for The Daily Beast.
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[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • D-Brief notes a new study examining the evolution of giant planets.
  • Cody Delistraty has a nice essay about the power of coincidence in the human mind.
  • Dead Things reports on the possible discovery of hominin remains in China dating from 2.2 million years ago.
  • Language Hat notes the discovery of an ancient tablet in Greece dating from the 3rd century CE containing the earliest extract of The Odyssey so far found.
  • Language Log notes the importance of the language skills of a multilingual teen in leading to the rescue of the boys trapped in a Thai cave.
  • Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution imagines what friendship would be like in a world of telepathy.
  • The Planetary Society Blog’s Jason Davis shares images taken by the Hayabusa2 probe of the asteroid Ryugu.
  • At Spacing, John Lorinc notes how the Ford government’s opposition to the clean energy policies of Wynne may well lead to the return of noticeable air pollution.
  • Window on Eurasia reports on Russian government actions intended to suppress what seems to be the spectre of separatism in Kaliningrad.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Anthrodendum recommends design researcher Jan Chipchase’s Field Study Handbook for anthropologists interested in field practice.
  • Architectuul investigates strange similarities between buildings built in far-removed parts of the world.
  • Centauri Dreams takes a look at TESS, the next generation of exoplanet-hunting satellite.
  • Crooked Timber investigates the connections between the spiritualism of the 19th century and the fiction of the uncanny.
  • D-Brief notes the many names, often delightful, that newly-discovered locations on Mercury and Charon have received.
  • Cody Delistraty investigates two exhibitions of French satirists, including Charlie Hedo’s Georges Wolinski, to examine the nature of satire.
  • The Dragon’s Tales considers the possibility of cryomagna leaving marks on the surface of Europa.
  • Drew Ex Machina takes a look at the strangely alien skies of TRAPPIST-1e. What would its sun look like? How would the other planets appear?
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at the new prominence of multigenerational households in the United States. While a response to economic strains, it also looks back to past traditions.
  • Hornet Stories notes how, on RuPaul’s Drag Race, Monet X Change gave a decent explanation behind the surprisingly recent birth of the modern British accent.
  • Imageo notes how a massive blob of warm water is rising to the surface of the Pacific.
  • At In A State of Migration, Lyman Stone explores the unique population history of Maine, to my eyes easily the most Atlantic Canadian of the fifty American states.
  • JSTOR Daily links to a paper exploring why modern video games can produce such rewarding experiences for players. (We can get meaning from many places.)
  • Language Log takes a look at the complexity of Chinese language classifications with a song by Yishi Band. What exactly is Yibin Sichuanese?
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money takes a look at an interesting question: When did Jews in the United States become white?
  • The LRB Blog takes a look at the baffling reasons behind the poisoning of the Skribins with Novichok, and the science behind it.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that this year, GDP per capita measured at PPP in Spain is higher than in Italy. (This probably says more about the disarray in Italy.)
  • The NYR Daily shares an interesting interview with cartoonist Art Spiegelman.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw tells of his experiences on a trip to the small Australian city of Armidale, in the region of New England.
  • Justin Petrone reflects on the tidy and clean, minimalist even, rural landscape of Estonia.
  • Progressive Download’s John Farrell notes brain scans that provide evidence of consciousness even in very young infants.
  • Drew Rowsome praises the Toronto production of the musical Fun Home, based on the Alison Bechdel graphic novel. I, for one, can’t wait to see it.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that, although Proxima Centauri is far too active a star for Proxima Centauri b to be Earth-like, that world could still plausibly host life-supporting environments.
  • Ilya Somin at the Volokh Conspiracy suggests a recent deal at the federal level in the US between Trump and Cory Gardner has created space for states to legalize marijuana without fear of federal intervention.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • At Anthropology.net, Kambiz Kamrani notes evidence that Australopithecus africanus suffered the same sorts of dental issues as modern humans.
  • Architectuul considers, in the specific context of Portugal, a project by architects seeking to create new vehicles and new designs to enable protest.
  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait looks at HD 34445, a Sun-like star somewhat older than our own that has two gas giants within its circumstellar habitable zone. Could these worlds have moons which could support life?
  • James Bow celebrates Osgoode as Gold, the next installment in the Toronto Comics anthology of local stories.
  • At Crooked Timber, Henry Farrell in the wake of Italian elections revisits the idea of post-democratic politics, of elections which cannot change things.
  • D-Brief notes that monkeys given ayahuasca seem to have been thereby cured of their depression. Are there implications for humans, here?
  • Dangerous Minds notes the facekini, apparently a popular accessory for Chinese beach-goers.
  • Imageo notes the shocking scale of snowpack decline in the western United States, something with long-term consequences for water supplies.
  • JSTOR Daily notes a paper suggesting that the cultivation of coffee does not harm–perhaps more accurately, need not harm–biodiversity.
  • Robert Farley at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the potential of the United States to start to extricate itself from the ongoing catastrophe in Yemen.
  • The NYR Daily features an interview with photographer Dominique Nabokov about her photos of living rooms.
  • Drew Rowsome writes a mostly-positive review of the new drama Rise, set around a high school performance of Spring Awakening. If only the lead, the drama teacher behind the production, was not straight-washed.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel makes the case that there are only three major types of planets, Terran and Neptunian and Jovian.
  • Towleroad notes the awkward coming out of actor Lee Pace.
  • Worthwhile Canadian Initiative suggests one way to try to limit the proliferation of guns would be to engineer in planned obsolescence, at least ensuring turnover.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell U>notes that one of his suggestions, ensuring that different national governments should have access to independent surveillance satellites allowing them to accurately evaluate situations on the ground, is in fact being taken up.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the unusual exoplanet HIP 65426 b, orbiting its parent star in a very distant orbit. Why is that?
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly shares some photos from an evening spent at the Metropolitan Opera in New York City.
  • Centauri Dreams imagines what could have been if Voyager 1 had, as some hoped, gone on to Pluto. What discoveries would have been made, decades before New Horizons by a probe with less capable instrumentation?
  • Dangerous Minds takes a look at David Bowie’s mid-1970s nadir, caught up in an oddly vegetarianism-driven panic over psychic espionage.
  • At In A State of Migration, Lyman Stone uses a variety of demographic, cultural, and economic markers to define the Rust Belt of the United States.
  • JSTOR Daily notes that, at one point, American funerals included swag, nice gifts to mourners like sets of gloves.
  • Language Hat notes a language of the Pakistani Himalayas, Badeshi, that turns out not to be quite completely extinct.
  • Justin Petrone, at north!, celebrates his discovery of a familiar type, an Italian coffeeshop owner, in his adopted Estonia.
  • Out There considers the remarkable potential of exploration and telescopic study at the edge of our solar system.
  • The Planetary Society Blog’s Emily Lakdawalla notes that the Japanese Hayabusa 2 probe has detected its target, asteroid Ryugu.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on tuyo, a Filipino comfort food combining dried fish with chocolate-flavoured rice porridge.
  • Peter Rukavina reports on an entertaining-sounding club meeting in Charlottetown, of Island subscribers to The New Yorker.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how the new Great Magellan telescope will not have artificial spikes marring its field of vision.
  • Towleroad notes< that CNN's Don Lemon is aware of Trump's nickname for him, "Sour Lemon".
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Russia’s working-age population is set to decline regardless of recent demographic initiatives.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the oddly recognizable shape of the Horsehead Nebula, and the reasons for this.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes how exceptionally difficult it is for current astronomers to track the transformation of stardust into planets.
  • Gizmodo notes a new theory for the formation of the Moon suggesting that, instead of condensing from the debris left by a Mars-mass object’s collision with the Earth, it condensed along with the Earth from a synestia.
  • JSTOR Daily notes an Indian entrepreneur who developed a generator transforming rice husks into electrical power for an entire village.
  • Language Hat takes a critical look at some of the claims made in a recent article suggesting Icelandic is at risk of extinction.
  • Elaine Showalter writes at the NYR Daily about the power of feminist fantasy and science fiction literature.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the apparent detection of the earliest-forming stars in the universe and their relationship with dark matter.
  • Strange Company notes the mysterious 1885 disappearance of New York City editor Samuel Stillman Conant. What happened to him? Why did he apparently abandon a happy life?
  • Whatever shares an idea for a fantasy universe from Tobias Buckell, imagining a world where magic has individual benefits but a terrible cost to the world at large. How would it be used?
  • Arnold Zwicky notes the death of Broadway and television star Nanette Fabray.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Centauri Dreams considers methods for detecting early life telescopically on exoplanets.
  • Crooked Timber considers how legislators bear personal responsibility, morally at least, for consequences of the legislations that they pass.
  • Bruce Dorminey reports that the new TESS telescope may well be capable of spotting dense clouds of satellites in geosynchronous orbit of exoplanets as distant as 100 light years.
  • Far Outliers considers how in Iran, the veil worn by a woman was a status symbol, for her husband and family as much as for the woman.
  • Language Hat reports on the strange survival of the classical manuscript Alexandra.
  • Language Log suggests that the Confucius Institute network set up by China does not seem to spread Chinese language so much as Chinese culture.
  • As the Mueller investigation continues, Lawyers, Guns and Money suggests many of the players in the Trump Administration are facing a real-life version of the prisoner’s dilemma.
  • The Map Room Blog notes how maps of London’s Chiswick have been compiled into a public mural.
  • The NYR Daily has an amusing sketched review of the Michaelangelo exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum. (My pictures will be coming!)
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at some of the fashion unveiled by Gucci in their recent Milan show.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains how cosmic inflation means that, despite the speed of light and the universe’s age of 13.8 billion years, we can see things now 46 billion light years away.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little looks at some of the social factors going into nuclear accidents.
  • Window on Eurasia reports a familiar sort of pattern, of Central Asian migrants held in Russian prisons spreading Islam among their fellow detainees.