A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘fashion

[URBAN NOTE] Ten Montréal links

  • MTL Blog shares this map of the Greater Montréal mass transit network, with a uniform design for all its networks, here.
  • Exo commuters in Montréal are decidedly unhappy with the Exo chairperson for the unhelpful tips they gave. CTV News reports.
  • Montréal has bought 140 acres of land in the West Island for its planned great park there. CTV News reports.
  • Notre Dame East is set to be revamped as an urban boulevard. CTV News reports.
  • Controversy over the Royalmount shopping complex grows. CBC reports.
  • Montréal is reckoned by a Google team to be a major centre for game development. CTV News reports.
  • A new fund seeks to increase the diversity of artists whose works are displayed in the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. CTV News reports.
  • Montréal mayor Valérie Plante promises to help out record stores fined for being opened past 5 on a weekend. CTV News reports.
  • Royal LePage suggests that home values in Montréal will grow sharply in 2020, more than in any other major Canadian city. CTV News reports.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

(A day late, I know; I crashed after work yesterday.)

  • Antipope’s Charlie Stross has a thought experiment: If you were superwealthy and guaranteed to live a long health life, how would you try to deal with the consequence of economic inequality?
  • Vikas Charma at Architectuul takes a look at the different factors that go into height in buildings.
  • Bad Astronomy notes S5-HVS1, a star flung out of the Milky Way Galaxy by Sagittarius A* at 1755 kilometres per second.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly shares photos from two Manhattan walks of hers, taken in non-famous areas.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at habitability for red dwarf exoplanets. Stellar activity matters.
  • Maria Farrell at Crooked Timber shares words from a manifesto about data protection in the EU.
  • Dangerous Minds shares photos from Los Angeles punks and mods and others in the 1980s.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes a ESA report suggesting crew hibernation could make trips to Mars easier.
  • Gizmodo notes that the Hayabusa2 probe of Japan is returning from asteroid Ryugu with a sample.
  • Imageo shares photos of the disastrous fires in Australia from space.
  • Information is Beautiful reports on winners of the Information is Beautiful Awards for 2019, for good infographics.
  • JSTOR Daily explains how local television stations made the ironic viewing of bad movies a thing.
  • Kotaku reports on the last days of Kawasaki Warehouse, an arcade in Japan patterned on the demolished Walled City of Kowloon.
  • Language Hat notes how translation mistakes led to the star Beta Cygni gaining the Arabic name Albireo.
  • Language Log reports on a unique Cantonese name of a restaurant in Hong Kong.
  • Robert Farley at Lawyers, Guns and Money links to an analysis of his suggesting the military of India is increasingly hard-pressed to counterbalance China.
  • The LRB Blog notes the catastrophe of Venice.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a paper suggesting states would do well not to place their capitals too far away from major population centres.
  • Justin Petrone at North! remarks on a set of old apple preserves.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how the west and the east of the European Union are divided by different conceptions of national identity.
  • Jim Belshaw at Personal Reflections reports from his town of Armidale as the smoke from the Australian wildfires surrounds all. The photos are shocking.
  • Emily Lakdawalla at the Planetary Society Blog lists some books about space suitable for children.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews the Canadian film music Stand!, inspired by the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a paper noting that, in Switzerland, parenthood does not make people happy.
  • The Signal notes that 1.7 million phone book pages have been scanned into the records of the Library of Congress.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains the concept of multi-messenger astronomy and why it points the way forward for studies of astrophysics.
  • Strange Maps looks at how a majority of students in the United States attend diverse schools, and where.
  • Strange Company explores the mysterious death of Marc-Antoine Calas, whose death triggered the persecution of Huguenots and resulted in the mobilization of Enlightenment figures like Voltaire against the state. What happened?
  • Towleroad hosts a critical, perhaps disappointed, review of the major gay play The Inheritance.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little looks at the power of individual people in political hierarchies.
  • Window on Eurasia shares an opinion piece noting how many threats to the Russian language have come from its association with unpopular actions by Russia.
  • Arnold Zwicky explores queens as various as Elizabeth I and Adore Delano.

[PHOTO] We The Champs sweatshirt, $C 69.99

Patriotism is not cheap.

We The Champs sweatshirt, $C 69.99 #toronto #mississauga #torontopearson #torontoraptors #wethenorth #wethechamps #clothing #sweatshirt

Written by Randy McDonald

October 18, 2019 at 11:45 am

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Adam Fish at anthro{dendum} compares different sorts of public bathing around the world, from Native America to Norden to Japan.
  • Charlie Stross at Antipope is unimpressed by the person writing the script for our timeline.
  • Architectuul reports on an architectural conference in Lisbon.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares stunning photos of the eruption of the Raikoke volcano in Kamchatka.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at what the Voyager spacecraft have returned about the edge of the solar system.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber takes issue with the idea of bipartisanship if it means compromising on reality, allegorically.
  • The Crux counts the number of people who have died in outer space.
  • D-Brief notes that the Andromeda Galaxy has swallowed up multiple dwarf galaxies over the eons.
  • Dead Things notes the identification of the first raptor species from Southeast Asia, Siamraptor suwati.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes a paper tracing the origins of interstellar comet 2/Borisov from the general area of Kruger 60.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog writes about the privilege allowing people access to affordable dental care.
  • Gizmodo tells how Alexei Leonov survived the first spacewalk.
  • io9 looks at the remarkable new status quo for the X-Men created by Jonathan Hickman.
  • Selma Franssen at the Island Review writes about the threats facing the seabirds of the Shetlands.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at what led Richard Nixon to make so many breaks from the American consensus on China in the Cold War.
  • Language Log notes an undergraduate course at Yale using the Voynich Manuscript as an aid in the study of language.
  • Abigail Nussbaum at Lawyers, Guns and Money explains her recent experience of the socialized health care system of Israel for Americans.
  • The LRB Blog looks at how badly the Fukuyama prediction of an end to history has aged.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a few maps of the new Ottawa LRT route.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a paper establishing a link between Chinese industries undermining their counterparts in Mexico and Mexican social ills including crime.
  • Sean Marshall reports from Ottawa about what the Confederation Line looks like.
  • Adam Shatz at the NYR Daily looks at the power of improvisation in music.
  • Roads and Kingdoms looks at South Williamsburg Jewish deli Gottlieb’s.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews</a the new Patti Smith book, Year of the Monkey.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a paper looking as the factors leading into transnational movements.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers the question of the direction(s) in which order in the universe was generated.
  • Window on Eurasia shares a report noting the very minor flows of migration from China to Russia.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at the politics in the British riding of Keighley.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at some penguin socks.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes new research on where the sun is located within the Milky Way Galaxy.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly considers the value of slow fashion.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the different gas giants that our early methods have yet to pick up.
  • Crooked Timber shares a lovely photo looking back at Venice from across its lagoon.
  • D-Brief notes that upcoming space telescopes might find hundreds of rogue planets thanks to microlensing.
  • io9 notes that Marvel will soon be producing Warhammer40K comics.
  • The Island Review shares some poetry and photography by Ken Cockburn inspired by the Isle of Jura.
  • JSTOR Daily notes that different humpback whale groups have different songs, different cultures.
  • Language Hat tries to find the meaning of the odd Soviet Yiddish word “kolvirt”.
  • Paul Campos at Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the history of Elizabeth Warren as a law teacher.
  • Map Room Blog shares information from Google Maps about its use of data.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that in 2016, not a single child born in the United Kingdom was given the name Nigel.
  • Peter Watts talks about AI and what else he is doing.
  • The NYR Daily marked the centennial of a horrible massacre of African-Americans centered on the Arkansas community of Elaine.
  • Emily Margolis at the Planetary Society Blog looks at how the Apollo moon missions helped galvanize tourism in Florida.
  • Noel Maurer at The Power and the Money looks at the constitutional crisis in Peru.
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at A Streetcar Named Desire.
  • Peter Rukavina looks at a spreadsheet revealing the distribution of PEI public servants.
  • Spacing reviews a book imagining how small communities can rebuild themselves in neoliberalism.
  • Towleroad shares the criticism of Christine and the Queens of the allegedly opportunistic use of queer culture by Taylor Swift.
  • Understanding Society considers, sociologically, the way artifacts work.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy argues that the 70th anniversary of the foundation of the People’s Republic of China should be a day of mourning, on account of the high human toll of the PRC.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests the Russian generation of the 1970s was too small to create lasting change.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at how underwear ads can be quite sexualized.

[NEWS] News from around the world: Cheetos fashion, Gaspé yaks, NL slavery, Lebanon comics, Netflix

  • Oh, why not a fashion show organized around the theme of Cheetos? VICE reports.
  • A farmer in the Gaspé peninsula is trying to retrieve all of his missing yaks. CBC Montreal has it.
  • A Newfoundland researcher and artist is examining the relationship of the island with Atlantic slavery. Global News reports.
  • Atlas Obscura takes a look at the alternative comics scene in the Middle East, centered on Lebanon.
  • Vanity Fair shares an account of how Netflix tried to sell itself, and its model, to Blockbuster and failed.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait looks at the extreme millisecond pulsar IGR J17062−6143.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at a proposal to intercept objects of extrasolar origin like ‘Oumuamua.
  • The Crux looks at how researchers are discovering traces of lost hominid populations in the DNA of contemporary humans.
  • D-Brief notes a crowdsourcing of a search for intermediate-mass black holes.
  • Gizmodo notes the impending production of a new working Commodore 64 clone.
  • The Island Review notes people of the Norway island of Sommarøy wish to make their island, home to the midnight sun, a #TimeFreeZone.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the art that has been produced in the era of digital addiction.
  • Language Log looks at how, in Iran, the word “Eastoxification” has entered into usage alongside the older “Westoxification.”
  • Dave Brockington at Lawyers, Guns, and Money looks at the many likely failings of a Corbyn foreign policy for the United Kingdom.
  • The LRB Blog notes that opposition candidate Ekrem İmamoğlu has been re-elected as mayor of Istanbul.
  • The Map Room Blog links to various maps of the Moon.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper looking at markets in Lagos, suggesting they are self-regulating to some degree.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains when the earliest sunrise and latest sunset of the year is, and why.
  • Towleroad shares an interview with Jack Baker and Mike McConnell, a same-sex couple married for nearly a half-century.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the open approach of the Russian Federation to Russian diasporids is not extended to diasporas of its minority groups, particularly to Muslim ones like Circassians and Tatars.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers some Pride fashion, with and without rainbows.