A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘fashion

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares some stunning photos of the polar regions of Jupiter, from Juno.
  • Centauri Dreams notes speculation on how antimatter could be harnessed for space propulsion.
  • D-Brief notes how nanotechnological design is used to create tools capable of extracting water from the air above the Atacama.
  • Russell Darnley notes the continuing peat fires in Sumatra’s Riau Province.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes evidence of an ancient cultural diffusion, from Copper Age Iberia, apparently not accompanied by gene flows.
  • Mark Graham links to a paper he co-authored looking at the viability of online work as an option, or not, in the Global South.
  • Hornet Stories notes an upcoming documentary about Harlem fashion figure Dapper Dan.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the surprising controversy around the practice of keeping crickets as pets, for entertainments including music and bloodsports.
  • Language Log looks at the extent to which Xi Jinping actually has been identified as a Tibetan bodhisattva.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the extent to which Mexican society has also experienced negative effects from NAFTA, in ways perhaps not unfamiliar to Americans.
  • Lingua Franca considers the usage of the term “blockbuster”.
  • Neuroskeptic notes a new paper suggesting there is no neurogenesis in adult humans.
  • The NYR Daily features an eyewitness description of a botched execution in Alabama. This one does indeed seem to be particularly barbaric.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes the rise of dictatorship worldwide.
  • Roads and Kingdoms <U?considers the simple joys of chilaquiles sandwiches in Guadalajara.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the vast bumber of starless planets, rogue planets, out there in the universe.
  • Worthwhile Canadian Initiative notes the fact, and the political import of the fact, that public-sector wages in Ontario are higher than private-sector ones.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the continuing decline of the Russian village, not helped by recent changes in policy under Putin.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes the difference, in business, between pre- and post-funding investments.
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[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • At Anthropology.net, Kambiz Kamrani notes evidence that Australopithecus africanus suffered the same sorts of dental issues as modern humans.
  • Architectuul considers, in the specific context of Portugal, a project by architects seeking to create new vehicles and new designs to enable protest.
  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait looks at HD 34445, a Sun-like star somewhat older than our own that has two gas giants within its circumstellar habitable zone. Could these worlds have moons which could support life?
  • James Bow celebrates Osgoode as Gold, the next installment in the Toronto Comics anthology of local stories.
  • At Crooked Timber, Henry Farrell in the wake of Italian elections revisits the idea of post-democratic politics, of elections which cannot change things.
  • D-Brief notes that monkeys given ayahuasca seem to have been thereby cured of their depression. Are there implications for humans, here?
  • Dangerous Minds notes the facekini, apparently a popular accessory for Chinese beach-goers.
  • Imageo notes the shocking scale of snowpack decline in the western United States, something with long-term consequences for water supplies.
  • JSTOR Daily notes a paper suggesting that the cultivation of coffee does not harm–perhaps more accurately, need not harm–biodiversity.
  • Robert Farley at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the potential of the United States to start to extricate itself from the ongoing catastrophe in Yemen.
  • The NYR Daily features an interview with photographer Dominique Nabokov about her photos of living rooms.
  • Drew Rowsome writes a mostly-positive review of the new drama Rise, set around a high school performance of Spring Awakening. If only the lead, the drama teacher behind the production, was not straight-washed.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel makes the case that there are only three major types of planets, Terran and Neptunian and Jovian.
  • Towleroad notes the awkward coming out of actor Lee Pace.
  • Worthwhile Canadian Initiative suggests one way to try to limit the proliferation of guns would be to engineer in planned obsolescence, at least ensuring turnover.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell U>notes that one of his suggestions, ensuring that different national governments should have access to independent surveillance satellites allowing them to accurately evaluate situations on the ground, is in fact being taken up.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Centauri Dreams considers methods for detecting early life telescopically on exoplanets.
  • Crooked Timber considers how legislators bear personal responsibility, morally at least, for consequences of the legislations that they pass.
  • Bruce Dorminey reports that the new TESS telescope may well be capable of spotting dense clouds of satellites in geosynchronous orbit of exoplanets as distant as 100 light years.
  • Far Outliers considers how in Iran, the veil worn by a woman was a status symbol, for her husband and family as much as for the woman.
  • Language Hat reports on the strange survival of the classical manuscript Alexandra.
  • Language Log suggests that the Confucius Institute network set up by China does not seem to spread Chinese language so much as Chinese culture.
  • As the Mueller investigation continues, Lawyers, Guns and Money suggests many of the players in the Trump Administration are facing a real-life version of the prisoner’s dilemma.
  • The Map Room Blog notes how maps of London’s Chiswick have been compiled into a public mural.
  • The NYR Daily has an amusing sketched review of the Michaelangelo exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum. (My pictures will be coming!)
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at some of the fashion unveiled by Gucci in their recent Milan show.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains how cosmic inflation means that, despite the speed of light and the universe’s age of 13.8 billion years, we can see things now 46 billion light years away.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little looks at some of the social factors going into nuclear accidents.
  • Window on Eurasia reports a familiar sort of pattern, of Central Asian migrants held in Russian prisons spreading Islam among their fellow detainees.

[NEWS] Five LGBTQ links: crime, Church and Wellesley, politics, Cape Breton, flannel

  • The vigil that Toronto’s Metropolitan Community Church is holding tonight for the victims of the Church and Wellesley serial killer sounds necessary, meaningful. CBC reports.
  • Vjosa Isai reported yesterday about a string of unsolved murders committed against gay men in the late 1970s in Toronto. I’m impressed; this is the first time I’ve come across mention of these victims since I read their names in digitized copies of the Body Politic. The article is at the Toronto Star.
  • The confidence of John Ibbitson that Church and Wellesley’s LGBTQ identity will remain fixed is bracing. The Globe and Mail has it.
  • The refusal of Cape Breton Regional Municipality Mayor Cecil Clarke to accept being blackmailed and to instead come it is good news, an item that made international headlines, for instance at Queerty.
  • Is flannel tired as a lesbian signifier? I wonder. Thoughts? VICE starts a discussion.

[PHOTO] Thirteen photos from The Body: Physique and Fashion, at the Museum at FIT (@museumatfit)

The Megabus drop-off point in Manhattan happens to be just outside the Museum of the Fashion Institute of Technology at West 27th and 7th. I had actually visited the place in 2012, and thought this location a good omen, so I popped inside.

The Body: Fashion and Physique, running until May, examines the ways in which fashion designers have traditionally tried to make the human body malleable for their fashions. The displayed clothing has an emphasis on how more recent designers are trying to be more inclusive of body diversity, or at least on the appearance of this tendency of late. (Featuring the famous Christian Siriano dress worn by Leslie Jones was a great idea!)

"The Body: Fashion and Physique" #newyorkcity #newyork #museumatfit #fashionandphysique #pamphlet #latergram

Martin Margiela tunic #newyorkcity #newyork #manhattan #museumatfit #fashionandphysique #martinmargiela #tunic #latergram

Silk brocade #newyorkcity #newyork #manhattan #museumatfit #fashionandphysique #bodice #latergram #silk #brocade

Men and women's dress of the Regency #newyorkcity #newyork #manhattan #fashion #museumatfit #fashionandphysique #regency #latergram

Formal tight-waisted dress in white #newyorkcity #newyork #manhattan #fashion #museumatfit #fashionandphysique #latergram

Victorian dresses with bustles #newyorkcity #newyork #manhattan #fashion #museumatfit #fashionandphysique #latergram

Corsets #newyorkcity #newyork #manhattan #fashion #museumatfit #fashionandphysique #corset #latergram

Early 20th century, including the Liberty of London #newyorkcity #newyork #manhattan #fashion #museumatfit #fashionandphysique #libertyoflondon #corset #latergram

Mid-20th century American #newyorkcity #newyork #manhattan #fashion #museumatfit #fashionandphysique #latergram

Men's fashion including the clone look #newyorkcity #newyork #manhattan #fashion #museumatfit #fashionandphysique #clone #gay #lgbtq #latergram

Perry Ellis and Issey Miyake #newyorkcity #newyork #manhattan #fashion #museumatfit #fashionandphysique #perryellis #isseymiyake #oversize #latergram

Dresses, including that of Leslie Jones #newyorkcity #newyork #manhattan #fashion #museumatfit #fashionandphysique #lesliejones #christiansiriano #latergram

Technological garments #newyorkcity #newyork #manhattan #fashion #museumatfit #fashionandphysique #gracejun #jacket #lucyjones #shirt #latergram

Written by Randy McDonald

January 21, 2018 at 9:45 am

[URBAN NOTE] Four Toronto links: computer dating, real estate, Canoe Landing, Christian Dior

  • Spacing’s Chris Bateman has an amusing piece about Toronto’s first experiments with computer dating, in 1957.
  • Edward Keenan makes the case that Toronto should prepare for the consequences of the housing market finally tanking, over at the Toronto Star.
  • blogTO notes an impressive design for a new multi-function community centre down at Canoe Landing.
  • Michelle Da Silva describes, at NOW Toronto, what looks like a spectacular exhibit of the works of Christian Dior at the ROM.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the discovery of Ross 128 b, a nearby exoplanet that looks like it actually might be plausibly very Earth-like.
  • blogTO notes that, after a decade, the east entrance of the Royal Ontario Museum is finally going to be an entrance again.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about the importance of self-care, of making time to experience pleasure.
  • Crooked Timber shares some of the 1871 etchings of Gustave Doré, fresh from the Paris Commune.
  • Daily JSTOR notes how one man’s collection of old tin cans tells a remarkable story about the settlement of the United States.
  • Dangerous Minds shares a vintage 1980 television report on the Los Angeles punk scene.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes a recent study of chemical abundances around Kronos and Krios, two very similar stars near each other, these abundances suggesting they are just forming planetary systems.
  • Gizmodo shares a revealing new table of exoplanets, one that brings out all sorts of interesting patterns and types.
  • Hornet Stories notes Courtney Love’s efforts to fundraise for LGBTQ homeless youth.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Margaret Court, an Australian tennis star now more famous for her homophobia, called for Australia to ignore the postal vote for marriage equality.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money makes the point that Trump’s Russian links are important to explore, not least because they reveal the spreading influence of kleptocracy.
  • Lingua Franca shares a perhaps over-stereotypical take on languages being caught between drives for purity and for diversity.
  • The LRB Blog notes the murder of Honduran environmental activist Berta Cácares.
  • The Map Room Blog links to an interesting collection of links to future and alternate-history mass transit maps of Melbourne.
  • The NYR Daily links to an interesting exhibit about disposable fashion like the simple T-shirt.
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes a remarkable performance of a Beatles song in the hill country of West Bengal.