A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘fast radio bursts

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomer notes the latest news on interstellar comet 2/Borisov.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly emphasizes how every writer does need an editor.
  • Centauri Dreams notes how the gas giant GJ 3512 b, half the mass of Jupiter orbiting a red dwarf star closely, is an oddly massive exoplanet.
  • Gina Schouten at Crooked Timber looks at inter-generational clashes on parenting styles.
  • D-Brief looks at the methods of agriculture that could conceivably sustain a populous human colony on Mars.
  • Bruce Dorminey argues that we on Earth need something like Starfleet Academy, to help us advance into space.
  • Colby King at the Everyday Sociology Blog looks at how the socio-spatial perspective helps us understand the development of cities.
  • Russell Arben Fox at In Media Res listens to the Paul McCartney album Flaming Pie.
  • io9 looks at Proxima, a contemporary spaceflight film starring Eva Green.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how the intense relationship between the US and Saudi Arabia began in, and reflected, the era of Jim Crow.
  • Language Hat notes a report suggesting that multilingualism helps ward off dementia.
  • Language Log takes issue with the names of the mascots of the 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the emergence of a ninth woman complaining about being harassed by Al Franken.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a new paper arguing that the Washington Consensus worked.
  • The NYR Daily shares an Aubrey Nolan cartoon illustrating the evacuation of war children in the United Kingdom during the Second World War.
  • At Out of Ambit, Diane Duane shares a nice collection of links for digital mapmakers.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at how the European Space Agency supports the cause of planetary defense.
  • Roads and Kingdoms interviews Kenyan writer Kevin Mwachiro at length.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel reports on how a mysterious fast radio burst helped illuminate an equally mysterious galactic halo.
  • Strange Company reports on the mysterious and unsolved death in 1936 of Canadian student Thomas Moss in an Oxfordshire hayrick.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps notes how Mount Etna is a surpassingly rare decipoint.
  • Understanding Society considers the thought of Koj√®ve, after Hegel, on freedom.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the falling numbers of Russians, and of state support for Russian language and culture, in independent Central Asia.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at how individual consumer responses are much less effective than concerted collective action in triggering change.
  • Arnold Zwicky reports on some transgender fashion models.

[NEWS] Five D-Brief links: white dwarfs, FRBs, Barnard’s Star b, AT2018cow, termites

  • A new study by astronomers suggests that white dwarfs evolve over eons as they cool into immense crystals. D-Brief reports.
  • Canadian astronomers have found a second mysterious repeating fast radio burst. D-Brief reports.
  • Subsurface environments suitable for life could conceivably exist at Barnard’s Star b. D-Brief reports.
  • Astronomers observing the mysterious AT2018cow event in nearby dwarf galaxy CGCG 137-068t may have witnessed the formation of a compact object, a black hole or a neutron star. D-Brief reports.
  • The turning of the earth wrought by termite hives in tropical rainforests may help protect these environments from drought. D-Brief reports.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares a stunning photo of two galaxies colliding in the eternal night and considers the implications of the Milky Way’s future encounter with Andromeda.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the latest discoveries regarding FRB 121102 and fast radio bursts generally.
  • Hornet Stories suggests that a recent ruling by the Inter American Court of Human Rights sets the stage for marriage equality across Latin America.
  • Inkfish notes that the biomass of dead squid mothers plays a major role in the environments and ecologies of seafloors.
  • JSTOR Daily suggests retirees can actually learn a lot from the lifestyles of members of the RV–recreational vehicle–community.
  • Language Hat reports on wordplay, and its translations, in the works of Homer.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the turn to anti-intellectualism among American conservatives.
  • At Lingua Franca, William Germano talks about telling numbers.
  • The LRB Blog notes the story of the English village of Imber, intentionally depopulated by the British military during the Second World War and never allowed to be restored.
  • The NYR Daily talks about a London exhibition on the art of our era of terrorism and terror.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on the latest Juno discoveries from Jupiter.
  • Progressive Download’s John Farrell reports on a debate as to whether the origin of life is a more difficult question than the origin of consciousness.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on the simple pleasures of an iced coffee enjoyed in the Australian Outback.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel U>considers an interesting question: is ours the only advanced civilization in the universe?
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little tackles the concept of organizational cultures.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that post-1991 immigrants from the former Soviet Union form a tenth of the Russian labour force.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares stunning deep-field pictures of intergalactic space.
  • Centauri Dreams shares the second part of Larry Klaes’ analysis of Forbidden Planet.
  • D-Brief suggests that controlled kangaroo hunting may be necessary for the ecological health of Australia.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes a new radio telescope in British Columbia that may help solve the mystery of fast radio burst.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes that quasars can irradiate a noteworthy fraction of potentially Earth-like planets.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money comes out against the idea of giving Amazon massive tax breaks for HQ2.
  • The LRB Blog bids a fond farewell to Saturn probe Cassini.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper suggesting new ideas–hence, new sources of economic growth–are harder to come by.
  • Maximos62 recounts a quietly chilling trip to East Timor where he discovers a landscape marked by genocide.
  • The New APPS Blog is quite unsurprised by news that Russians may have used Facebook to manipulate the US election.
  • At Out of Ambit, Diane Duane bids a fond farewell to colleague Len Wein.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw does not think Australia is committed enough to affordable housing to solve homelessness Finland-style.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from the Suwalki Gap, the thin corridor joining the Baltic States to Poland.
  • Peter Rukavina looks at how a storied land rover was recovered from St. Helena.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel lists the top six discoveries of Cassini at Saturn.
  • Towleroad notes fundamentally misaimed criticism of new AI that determines sexual orientation from facepics.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at contemporary Russian fears about the power of rising China in Russia’s Asian territories.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Apostrophen’s ‘Nathan Smith updates readers on his writing projects and points them to anthologies looking for new submissions.
  • blogTO talks about the origins of Bay Street.
  • Centauri Dreams notes new discoveries about the origins of mysterious “fast radio bursts”.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes how a genetic study of Panama’s population showed the impact of colonization.
  • Joe. My. God. notes Germany’s opening of a centre for LGBT refugees.
  • Language Log notes controversy over simplified characters in Hong Kong and poor fluency in kanji in Japan.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the controversies surrounding the commemoration of the death of Scalia at Georgetown University.
  • Steve Munro looks at various routes for a relief line in the east of the city.
  • North’s Justin Petrone talks about teaching his daughter who ran Estonia during the Soviet era.
  • Strange Maps maps Europe divided into city-states.
  • Window on Eurasia notes Kazakhstan’s plan to shift to Latin script for Kazakh and looks at ethnic Russian converts to Islam.