A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘federalism

[URBAN NOTE] Four Toronto links: rent control, Toronto Islands, 401 Richmond, amalgamation

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  • The Ontario government is not backing down on rent control despite impending conversions of real estate to condos.
  • blogTO notes this last heat wave has made the Toronto Islands superb, at last. I visited Sunday–visit while you can.
  • The 401 Richmond arts centre is getting tax relief, letting it function as a home for culture in a booming downtown.
  • Christopher Hume argues amalgamation, by undermining old power structures, made progress in Toronto impossible.
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[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Far Outliers notes how the new Suez Canal helped create a network of coal-using port cities across Eurasia.
  • Hornet Stories notes that Serbia’s out lesbian Prime Minister, Ana Brnabic, marched in Belgrade’s pride parade.
  • Joe. My. God. notes a statement by the Pentagon that transgender troops can still re-enlist for the next few months.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes a fundamentally ill-thought defense of colonialism by Bruce Gilley.
  • Marginal Revolutions notes that Swedish support for the far right is linked to perceptions of foreign threats to employment.
  • Out There looks at the last days of Cassini at Saturn.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw notes real estate shenanigans in greater Sydney.
  • Drew Rowsome has a critical, but positive, review of closeted gay author Frank M. Robinson’s autobiography.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy sums up the outcome of the controversial monkey selfie copyright case.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that Russian challenges to language legislation in Tatarstan hint at future challenges.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • blogTO lists some interesting things to do and see in Toronto’s American neighbour, Buffalo.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly strongly defends contemporary journalism as essential for understanding the world.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money rightly takes issue with the claim identity politics hinders the US left. Remember New Deal coalitions?
  • Marginal Revolution notes just how expensive it is to run Harvard.
  • Otto Pohl notes the upcoming 76th anniversary of the Soviet deportation of the Volga Germans.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer reports on the remarkably fluent code-switching between English and French of some Washington D.C. subway riders.
  • Strange Maps notes rival food and fabric maps of India and Pakistan.
  • Tricia Wood at Torontoist argues that, for environmental and economic reasons, Ontario needs high-speed rail.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Tatarstan has done a poor job of defending its sovereignty from the Russian government.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Antipope Charlie Stross takes a look at the parlous state of the world, and imagines what if the US and UK went differently.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait takes a look at Sirius, including white dwarf Sirius B.
  • Centauri Dreams considers Cassini’s final function, as a probe of Saturn’s atmosphere.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery that diamonds rain deep in Neptune (and Uranus).
  • Bruce Dorminey reports on a NASA scientist’s argument that we need new interstellar probes, not unlike Voyager 1.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog looks at the way a course syllabus is like a Van Halen contract rider.
  • Language Hat takes a look at the palimpsests of St. Catherine’s Monastery, deep in the Sinai.
  • Language Log looks at the etymology, and the history, of chow mein.
  • The LRB Blog recounts a visit to Mount Rushmore in the era of Trump.
  • Marginal Revolution takes a look at the question of why Mexico isn’t enjoying higher rates of economic growth.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw considers the extent to which politics these days is just sound and fury, meaning nothing.
  • Mark Simpson links to an essay of his explaining why we should be glad the Smiths broke up in 1987.
  • Speed River Journal’s Van Waffle considers the import, to him and the environment, of a spring near his cottage.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the abundance of black holes in our galaxy, more than one hundred million.
  • Unicorn Booty notes that smoking marijuana might–might–have sexual benefits.
  • Window on Eurasia shares an argument that ethnic Russians in Russia share issue in common with whites in America, and reports on an argument made by one man that ethnic Russians in republics need not learn local languages.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Anthrodendum considers the question of what, exactly, is the genre of ethnographic film.
  • Centauri Dreams features authors’ calls for a debate on METI, on sending messages to extraterrestrial intelligences.
  • The Crux reports on the continuing damage caused by the continuing eruptions of Indonesia’s mud volcano, Sidoarjo.
  • Imageo shares a cute time-lapse video from Hubble showing the motion of Phobos around Mars.
  • Language Hat responds to a newly-translated mid-19th century Russian novella, Nadezhda Khvoshchinskaya‘s 1861 novella Пансионерка (The Boarding School Girl).
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money has a depressing extended examination of Trump as reflecting structural crisis in the United States.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the genesis and continuing success of Nicaraguan Sign Language.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a satirical map of Washington D.C., defined by the names that its metro stations should have.
  • Ethan Siegel at Starts With A Bang lists the various worlds in our Solar System possibly hosting life, and notes how you could get an Earth-like world with wildly erratic seasons as in Game of Thrones.
  • Unicorn Booty notes that the German president has signed marriage equality into law. (Also, the country has good LGBT protections.)
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Putin is fine with an asymmetrical bilingualism in Russia’s republics, aimed against non-Russian languages.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about her vacation in Croatia’s Istria.
  • Centauri Dreams highlights the work of citizen scientists who are producing stunning images of Jupiter through Juno data.
  • Cody Delistraty examines the unique history of Paris’ Maison de Verre, a house made entirely of glass.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes a recent study suggesting red dwarfs tend to produce stellar winds stripping exo-Earths of their atmospheres.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the mechanics of press censorship in a changing Burma.
  • Language Log’s Geoff Nunberg points out that the phrase “… in the woodpile” is indelibly marked with racism.
  • The NYR Daily remembers the life and notes the death of Xiu Liaobo.
  • Pamela MacNaughtan at Roads and Kingdoms tells the story of how she found the perfect lobster roll on the Iles-de-la-Madeleine.
  • The Signal shares a provocative discussion on the potential role and future decipherability of the emoji in language.
  • Towleroad shares a comforting legal analysis suggesting that marriage equality is not yet threatened in the United States.
  • Transit Toronto notes another weekend subway shutdown, this time on the Bloor line west from Ossington.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that this year will be critical for Russia’s future relationship with Tatarstan.
  • Unicorn Booty largely approves, as do I, of the controversial recent Teen Vogue guide to anal sex. Safe sex is informed sex.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares photos of the purple-heavy gardens of his neighbourhood in California.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait talks about some new observations of the dusty ring of Fomalhaut.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on a new theory about the magnetic fields of Uranus.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reports on a new Lin-Manuel Miranda mixtape referencing immigration, including the refugee crisis.
  • The LRB Blog reports on the terrible psychological toll of Grenfell Tower for the survivors, including the very young.
  • Neuroskeptic wonders if psychology papers might give criminals ideas.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy reports on a Canadian court ruling ordering Google to remove search results worldwide.
  • Window on Eurasia argues Russia must take care not to undermine protection for non-Russian languages in the republics, and describes a new total mobilization policy in Belarus possibly aimed against Russia.