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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘federalism

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Anthrodendum considers the question of what, exactly, is the genre of ethnographic film.
  • Centauri Dreams features authors’ calls for a debate on METI, on sending messages to extraterrestrial intelligences.
  • The Crux reports on the continuing damage caused by the continuing eruptions of Indonesia’s mud volcano, Sidoarjo.
  • Imageo shares a cute time-lapse video from Hubble showing the motion of Phobos around Mars.
  • Language Hat responds to a newly-translated mid-19th century Russian novella, Nadezhda Khvoshchinskaya‘s 1861 novella Пансионерка (The Boarding School Girl).
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money has a depressing extended examination of Trump as reflecting structural crisis in the United States.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the genesis and continuing success of Nicaraguan Sign Language.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a satirical map of Washington D.C., defined by the names that its metro stations should have.
  • Ethan Siegel at Starts With A Bang lists the various worlds in our Solar System possibly hosting life, and notes how you could get an Earth-like world with wildly erratic seasons as in Game of Thrones.
  • Unicorn Booty notes that the German president has signed marriage equality into law. (Also, the country has good LGBT protections.)
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Putin is fine with an asymmetrical bilingualism in Russia’s republics, aimed against non-Russian languages.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about her vacation in Croatia’s Istria.
  • Centauri Dreams highlights the work of citizen scientists who are producing stunning images of Jupiter through Juno data.
  • Cody Delistraty examines the unique history of Paris’ Maison de Verre, a house made entirely of glass.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes a recent study suggesting red dwarfs tend to produce stellar winds stripping exo-Earths of their atmospheres.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the mechanics of press censorship in a changing Burma.
  • Language Log’s Geoff Nunberg points out that the phrase “… in the woodpile” is indelibly marked with racism.
  • The NYR Daily remembers the life and notes the death of Xiu Liaobo.
  • Pamela MacNaughtan at Roads and Kingdoms tells the story of how she found the perfect lobster roll on the Iles-de-la-Madeleine.
  • The Signal shares a provocative discussion on the potential role and future decipherability of the emoji in language.
  • Towleroad shares a comforting legal analysis suggesting that marriage equality is not yet threatened in the United States.
  • Transit Toronto notes another weekend subway shutdown, this time on the Bloor line west from Ossington.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that this year will be critical for Russia’s future relationship with Tatarstan.
  • Unicorn Booty largely approves, as do I, of the controversial recent Teen Vogue guide to anal sex. Safe sex is informed sex.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares photos of the purple-heavy gardens of his neighbourhood in California.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait talks about some new observations of the dusty ring of Fomalhaut.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on a new theory about the magnetic fields of Uranus.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reports on a new Lin-Manuel Miranda mixtape referencing immigration, including the refugee crisis.
  • The LRB Blog reports on the terrible psychological toll of Grenfell Tower for the survivors, including the very young.
  • Neuroskeptic wonders if psychology papers might give criminals ideas.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy reports on a Canadian court ruling ordering Google to remove search results worldwide.
  • Window on Eurasia argues Russia must take care not to undermine protection for non-Russian languages in the republics, and describes a new total mobilization policy in Belarus possibly aimed against Russia.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Centauri Dreams looks at two brown dwarf pairs, nearby Luhman 16 and eclipsing binary WD1202-024.
  • D-Brief notes a study suggesting panspermia would be easy in the compact TRAPPIST-1 system.
  • Far Outliers notes the shouted and remarkably long-range vocal telegraph of early 20th century Albania.
  • Language Hat links to a fascinating blog post noting the survival of African Latin in late medieval Tunisia.
  • The LRB Blog notes the observations of an Englishman in Northern Ireland that, after the DUP’s rise, locals are glad other Britons are paying attention.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a study suggesting that refugees in the US end up paying more in taxes than they receive in benefits.
  • Spacing reviews a fascinating-sounding new book on the politics and architecture of new libraries.
  • Understanding Society examines the mechanisms through which organizations can learn.
  • Window on Eurasia talks about the progressive detachment of the east of the North Caucasus, at least, from wider Russia.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • blogTO describes the changing designs of TTC maps over the past generations.
  • Cody Delistraty links to an article of his contrasting and comparing Donald Trump to Louis XIV.
  • Marginal Revolution shares facts about Qatar in this time of its issues.
  • Peter Rukavina describes the latest innovations in his homebrew blogging.
  • Towleroad notes the sad anniversary of the Pulse massacre in Orlando, particularly for queers of colour.
  • Window on Eurasia argues for the potential of Idel-Ural, a coalition of non-Russian minorities by the Volga.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell examines how Labour and the Tories used Big Data, and how Labour did much better.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • blogTO shares media exploring how Toronto was marketed internationally in the 1980s. This decade apparently saw less concentration on landmarks and more on cultural activities.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a National Geographic collection of the childhood maps of cartographers.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that the loosening of China’s one-child policy has not resulted in much change.
  • Justin Petrone wonders if Estonians are weird.
  • Steve Munro reports on the many, many problematic things coming out of Metrolinx, including fare-by-distance and the ongoing PRESTO disasters.
  • Supernova Condensate shares a thought-provoking set of statues on global warming, Follow the Leaders.
  • Torontoist’s Kieran Delamont notes the astonishing thoughtlessness of new fashion brand Homeless Toronto.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at a Belarus in a state of political ferment that might–might–be pre-revolutionary, and wonders if disbanding Russia’s ethnic republics could be profoundly destabilizing.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • blogTO reports on the history of Toronto’s Wellington Street.
  • Dangerous Minds introduces me to the grim American gothic that is Wisconsin Death Trip. What happened to Black River Falls in the 1890s?
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to hypotheses about KIC 8462852, one suggesting KIC 8462852 has four exoplanets, another talking about a planet’s disintegration.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to a paper modeling the mantles of icy moons.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at small city NIMBYism in the Oregon city of Eugene.
  • The LRB Blog reports on toxically racist misogyny directed towards Labour’s Diane Abbott by Tory minister David Davis, “misogynoir” as it is called.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw reports on the elections in Indonesia, a country increasingly important to Australia.
  • Peter Rukavina describes how the builders of his various indie phones, promising in their own rights, keep dropping them.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer is optimistic that NAFTA will survive mostly as is.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy examines the ruling against Trump’s immigration order on the grounds that its planners explicitly designed it as an anti-Muslim ban.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that the treaty-based federalism of Tatarstan within Russia is increasingly unpopular with many wanting a more centralized country.