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Posts Tagged ‘federalism

[NEWS] Twenty news links

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  • NOW Toronto looks at the Pickering nuclear plant and its role in providing fuel for space travel.
  • In some places like California, traffic is so bad that airlines actually play a role for high-end commuters. CBC reports.
  • Goldfish released into the wild are a major issue for the environment in Québec, too. CTV News reports.
  • China’s investments in Jamaica have good sides and bad sides. CBC reports.
  • A potato museum in Peru might help solve world hunger. The Guardian reports.
  • Is the Alberta-Saskatchewan alliance going to be a lasting one? Maclean’s considers.
  • Is the fossil fuel industry collapsing? The Tyee makes the case.
  • Should Japan and Europe co-finance a EUrasia trade initiative to rival China’s? Bloomberg argues.
  • Should websites receive protection as historically significant? VICE reports.
  • Food tourism in the Maritimes is a very good idea. Global News reports.
  • Atlantic Canada lobster exports to China thrive as New England gets hit by the trade war. CBC reports.
  • The Bloc Québécois experienced its revival by drawing on the same demographics as the provincial CAQ. Maclean’s reports.
  • Population density is a factor that, in Canada, determines political issues, splitting urban and rural voters. The National Observer observes.
  • US border policies aimed against migration from Mexico have been harming businesses on the border with Canada. The National Post reports.
  • The warming of the ocean is changing the relationship of coastal communities with their seas. The Conversation looks.
  • Archival research in the digital age differs from what occurred in previous eras. The Conversation explains.
  • The Persian-language Wikipedia is an actively contested space. Open Democracy reports.
  • Vox notes how the US labour shortage has been driven partly by workers quitting the labour force, here.
  • Laurie Penny at WIRED has a stirring essay about hope, about the belief in some sort of future.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomy notes a new detailed study suggesting that asteroid Hygeia is round. Does this mean it is a dwarf planet?
  • The Buzz notes that the Toronto Public Library has a free booklet on the birds of Toronto available at its branches.
  • Crooked Timber looks forward to a future, thanks to Trump, without the World Trade Organization.
  • D-Brief notes how the kelp forests off California were hurt by unseasonal heat and disease.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes an impending collision of supergalactic clusters.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog looks at how judgement can complicate collective action.
  • Language Hat looks at the different definitions of the word “mobile”.
  • Language Log looks at the deep influence of the Persian language upon Marathi.

    Marathi and Persian

  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how, if anything, climate scientists make conservative claims about their predictions.
  • Marginal Revolution wonders if planned power outages are a good way to deal with the threat of wildfires in California.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the ethnic cleansing being enabled by Turkey in Kurdish Syria.
  • Corey S. Powell at Out There interviews archeologist Arthur Lin about his use of space-based technologies to discovery traces of the past.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks at the staggering inequality in Chile, driver of the recent protests.
  • At Roads and Kingdoms, Anthony Elghossain reports from the scene of the mass protests in Lebanon.
  • Drew Rowsome tells how his balcony garden fared this year.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at stellar generations in the universe. (Our sun is a third-generation star.)
  • Strange Company looks at the murder of a girl five years old in Indiana in 1898. Was the neighbor boy twelve years old accused of the crime the culprit?
  • Denis Colombi at Une heure de peine takes a look at social mobility in France.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little considers economic historians and their study of capitalism.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the pro-Russian policies of the Moldova enclave of Gagauzia, and draws recommendations for Ukraine re: the Donbas.

[NEWS] Eighteen #cdnpoli and #exln43 links

  • MacLean’s looks at how Justin Trudeau and the Liberals survived #elxn43, here.
  • Ajay Parasram at The Conversation looks at the new complications faced by Justin Trudeau.
  • Daily Xtra looks at the record of the Liberals on LGBTQ2 issues, here.
  • Daily Xtra looks at the four out LGBTQ2 MPs elected to Parliament, here.
  • Philippe Fournier at MacLean’s argues that 338Canada stands vindicated in its predictions, with some 90% of the people it predicted would be elected being elected.
  • What will become of Conservative leader Andrew Scheer? The National Post considers.
  • Strategic voting and Doug Ford, Mark Gollom notes, kept the Conservatives from making a breakthrough in Ontario.
  • Robyn Urback at CBC notes that the narrow conservatism of Scheer kept the Conservatives from victory in a wary Canada.
  • Stephen Maher at MacLean’s questions if the Bloc Québécois victory has much to do with separatism, per se.
  • Voters in Québec seem to be fine with election results, with a strong Bloc presence to keep the Liberals on notice. CBC has it.
  • Talk of separatism has taken off in Alberta following the #elxn43 results. Global News has it.
  • The premier of Saskatchewan has also talked of his province’s alienation after #elxn43, here in the National Post.
  • CBC’s As It Happens carries an interview with former Conservative MP Jay Hill, now an advocate for western Canadian separatism.
  • Atlantic Canada may provide new members for the cabinet of Justin Trudeau. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Jaime Battiste, Liberal, has been elected as the first Mi’kmaq MP from Nova Scotia. Global News has it.
  • The Green Party did not make its hoped-for breakthrough on Vancouver Island, but it will struggle on. Global News has it.
  • Did, as Politico suggested, Canada sleepwalk into the future with #elxn43?
  • We should be glad, Scott Gilmore argues in MacLean’s, that given the global challenges to democracy #elxn43 in Canada was relatively boring.

[NEWS] #cdnpoli and #elxn41 items from across Canada: BC, Alberta, Québec, PEI

  • The affordability of rent was an election issue in British Columbia. CBC reports.
  • Philippe Fournier notes at Maclean’s that the sheer solidity of the Conservative vote in Alberta means that province will not get that much attention.
  • The Bloc Québécois has good reason to be exacerbating the clash between Québec and Alberta in the federal campaign. The National Post reports.
  • CBC reports on the growing unpopularity of the Liberals in Québec outside of Montréal, here.
  • That the Liberals had a campaign song that was initially translated very badly into French is a big gaffe. CTV News reports.
  • Philippe Fournier at Maclean’s noted the legendary volatility of Québec politics, here.
  • Will the Orange Line extension in Montréal be guaranteed funding, no matter who gets elected? CBC reports.
  • The fate of NDP Berthier-Maskonge MP Ruth Ellen Brosseau, elected in the 2011 Orange Wave, may determine the fate of the NDP in Québec. CTV News reports.
  • Atlantic Canada is likely to see substantial losses for the Liberals, as reported here.
  • Stu Neatby reports that advance poll turnout on PEI rose by 13% compared to 2015.
  • Will the PEI riding of Egmont go Conservative? CBC considers.

[NEWS] Five politics links: Ontario, Québec, NDP, Prince Andrew, Alberta

  • Enzo DiMatteo suggests at NOW Toronto that Ford wants Scheer to lose, so Ford will have a chance with the federal Conservatives, here.
  • Jonathan Montpetit writes at CBC Montreal about the conservative nationalism that has become mainstream in Québec under the CAQ, here.
  • Robyn Urback writes at the CBC about the failure of the NDP under Jagmeet Singh to capitalize on the weakness of the two dominant parties, here.
  • I do think that the rumoured connections of Prince Andrew to the Epstein network could easily become a huge unexpected crisis for the British royal family. VICE reports.
  • Max Fawcett at MacLean’s is probably right to note that, to be taken seriously, Alberta should stop voting Conservative. His arguments are here.

Written by Randy McDonald

September 15, 2019 at 10:15 pm

[NEWS] Ten links about politics and culture and the future

  • The Conversation looks at how the past religious homogeneity of Québec influences contemporary secularism.
  • Scott Gilmore at MacLean’s writes, correctly, about how Canadians in different provinces are deeply disconnected from each other.
  • Shannon Proudfoot writes at MacLean’s about how physicist Philippe J. Fournier ended up developing a second career as a predictor of Canadian elections.
  • Are legal battles between different levels of Canadian government the new normal? CBC considers.
  • The Conversation notes that most rural areas in the United States are bound to decline for structural reasons.
  • This Guardian article looks at how a high-profile gang rape in Spain helped drive the growth of the far-right Vox Party via anti-feminism and misogyny.
  • Jezebel looks at the foolish and shortsighted alliance between transphobic feminists and right-wing groups.
  • Buzzfeed shares the story of how former alt-right activist Katie McHugh is trying to rebuild her life, and her plea to her fellows to leave before they get sucked in.
  • Paul Salvatori writes at NOW Toronto about how the algorithms of major social networking platforms suck people into becoming consumers of inflammatory content.
  • Maggie Hennefeld at Open Democracy considers if “clownish outsiders” are going to be the leaders of the democracies of the future.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Larry Claes at Centauri Dreams considers the issues of the alien featuring in the title of the classic The Thing, facing human persecution.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber starts a debate about past blogging and conventional wisdom.
  • The Crux reports on a mass rescue of orphaned flamingo chicks in South Africa.
  • D-Brief notes new evidence that asteroids provided perhaps half of the Earth’s current supply of water.
  • Cody Delistraty looks at how the far-right in Germany is appropriating artworks to support its view of history.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that China may be hoping to build a base at the Moon’s south pole by 2029.
  • Far Outliers reports on the 1865 collapse of the Confederacy.
  • Gizmodo reports on how astronomers have identified the approximate location of a kilonova that seeded the nascent solar system with heavy elements.
  • Joe. My. God. shares the news from yet another study demonstrating that HIV cannot be transmitted by HIV-undetectable people. U=U.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how, via Herb Caen, the Beat Generation became known as Beatniks.
  • Language Hat shares and comments upon a passage from Dostoevsky noting how an obscenity can be stretched out into an entire conversation.
  • Language Log considers a peculiarity of the Beijing dialect.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how statehood has been used to game the American political system.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper suggesting that countries with greater levels of gender inequality are more likely to produce female chess grandmasters.
  • Justin Petrone at North!, considering the history of writers in Estonia, considers what the mission of the writer should be.
  • The NYR Daily examines the black people once miners in the Kentucky town of Lynch, remembering and sharing their experiences.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw considers what he has learned from a recent research and writing contract.
  • Jason C. Davis at the Planetary Society Blog reports in greater detail on the crater Hayabusa 2 made in asteroid Ryugu.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains how the Event Horizon Telescope acts like a mirror.
  • Strange Company shares an impressively diverse collection of links.
  • Towleroad talks with writer Tim Murphy about his new novel, Correspondents.
  • Window on Eurasia considers future directions for Ukrainian language policy.
  • Arnold Zwicky takes a look at the artistic riches horded by the Nazis in the Bavarian castle of Neuschwanstein.