A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘feminism

[NEWS] Seven links, from drugs in Germany to dolphin cuisine to dual nations in Australia

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  • Johann Hari writes for Open Democracy about what may be the beginning of the end of the drug war in Germany.
  • I am not in agreement with Joseph Couture’s argument in NOW Toronto that the Internet has ended gay communities. (Convince me.)
  • Samantha Edwards reports in NOW Toronto controversy regarding the Parkdale feminist street art event. Was it really intersectional?
  • James Cooray Smith wonders–or “wonders”–why some Doctor Who fans are so upset with a woman portraying the Doctor.
  • In MacLean’s, chief Perry Bellegarde argues that more Canadians should be concerned with the too-many deaths of young First Nations people in Thunder Bay.
  • The National Post tells the story of how Australian senator Larissa Walters had to unexpectedly resign her position on account of her Canadian birth.
  • Via James Nicoll, a paper claiming evidence of human presence in northern Australia, in Madjedbebe, 65k years ago.
  • National Geographic tells of the peculiar way some Gulf of Mexico dolphins prepare their catfish. Is it cultural, culinary even?

[URBAN NOTE] Four Toronto blog links, from feminist street art to the changing retail scene

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  • Steve Munro shares photos of the ongoing reconstruction of Dundas and Victoria, on the 505 Dundas streetcar route.
  • blogTO notes that the steady increase in rental prices in Toronto came to a halt this month.
  • John Lorinc at Spacing starts a series speculating on the safety of Toronto hi-rises for seniors.
  • Torontoist reports on the achievements and the controversy of a feminist street art event in Parkdale.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Charley Ross notes the belated recovery and identification of Margret Dodd, four decades after her abduction and more than two after her body was found.
  • D-Brief notes that the Pale Red Dot is extending their exoplanet search from Proxima Centauri to include Barnard’s Star and Ross 154.
  • Dangerous Minds shares colour autochromes of American women from a century ago.
  • Gizmodo notes more evidence suggesting Mars’ moons, Phobos and Deimos, are legacies of a massive Mars impact.
  • The LRB Blog looks back at the 1951 “Festival of Britain”.
  • Roads and Kingdoms’ Karen Dias looks at a girls’ soccer team in Haryana, north India.
  • Peter Rukavina shares a sketch of some of the work being done at Province House.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy looks at the timeline for Russian influence on the Trump campaign.
  • Window on Eurasia comes to worrying conclusions about ethnic conflict in Daghestan.

[NEWS] Four culture links: the Metro book fairy, Transformers, the 13th Doctor, and the alt-right

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  • CBC Montreal notes how Andrée Archambault has been leaving books on the Montréal Metro for commuters to find.
  • CBC’s Jonathan Ore notes the (perhaps surprisingly) innovative Transformers comics put out by IDW.
  • At The Conversation, Una McCormack writes about how the 13th Doctor being played by Jodie Whittaker fulfills her childhood dreams.
  • At The Globe and Mail, Russell Smith examines why the alt-right hates cultural experimentation and innovation so much.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at some stunning imagery of the Great Red Spot of Jupiter.
  • Inkfish notes that some jumping spiders do not just look like ants, they walk like them, too.
  • Language Log has gentle fun with the trend to develop heat maps for American English dialects.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the idea of disgust as it is made to relate to the homeless.
  • Siva Vijenthira at Spacing considers the particular importance of biking for the independence of women.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers whether or not terraforming Mars is worth it. (Yes, but it will be costly.)
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that China is displacing Russia, despite the latter’s efforts, as the main trade partner of smaller post-Soviet countries.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares an amusing photo of the Wonder Bears of Provincetown.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait investigates a mysterious streak on a photo of Messier 77. Asteroid, satellite, something else?
  • Centauri Dreams reports on the latest attempt at a census estimate of brown dwarfs in the Milky Way Galaxy.
  • Crooked Timber’s John Quiggin considers the diminishing role of the pundit, displaced by the expert.
  • D-Brief is one of many sources to note the deadly, ubiquitous perchlorates of Mars. Mars is dead for good reasons.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money links to a tweetstorm by one Kate Antonova arguing that the ideological labels of the long 19th century no longer speak to our issues.
  • Language Hat notes how early Tsarist mappers were confused by confusing, often shared, placenames.
  • The LRB Blog reports on the recovery of a Bloomsbury Wedgwood service features the images of notable women.
  • Marginal Revolution shares opinions that Macron is overrated, not least in terms of the distinctiveness of some of his policies from those of Trump.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that projected shrinkage of the workforce of Russia means either economic decline or controversial immigration.

[NEWS] Seven links, from Nickelback to nuclear energy to Second World War refugees

  • Anthony Easton at MacLean’s writes in defense of Nickelback, one of Canada’s most popular bands if not a critical darling.
  • Also in MacLean’s, Stephanie Carvin notes that the new foreign and military policies announced by the Canadian government could still fall short.
  • Bloomberg View’s Stephen L. Carter considers the idea of the just war through the lens of Wonder Woman.
  • Nuclear energy, it seems, will be India’s answer to global warming in the era of Trump.
  • Qataris, Bloomberg notes, are trying to deal with their island country’s state of siege.
  • Airbus may pull its production plants from the United Kingdom unless the country keeps single market access.
  • Refugees, Lynne Olson notes at National Geographic, helped save the United Kingdom during the Second World War.