A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘feminism

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

leave a comment »

  • The Buzz recommends twenty-four different novels for Valentine’s Day, drawing on the recommendations of employees of the Toronto Public Library.
  • Centauri Dreams links to a new paper suggesting there are thousands of objects of extrasolar origin, some tens of kilometres in size, in our planetary system right now.
  • D-Brief notes that cryptocurrency is hindering the search for extraterrestrial life, as miners buy up the graphics cards SETI researchers need.
  • Lyman Stone at In A State of Migration notes how unbalanced the marriage market can be for professional women in the United States interested in similar partners, especially for African-American women.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how deeply the dreams of Martin Luther King Jr. for racial equality in the United States were driven by anti-colonial nationalism in Africa.
  • The LRB Blog notes how the life and writing of Penelope Fitzgerald was influenced by two decades of living on the English coast, suspended between land and water.
  • At the NYR Daily, Melissa Chadburn tells of what she learned from counting, and queueing, and perservering in routines.
  • At The Numerati, Stephen Baker shares an excerpt from his new book, Dark Site, describing a teenager’s attempts to control a cognitive implant.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer takes issue with elements of the timing of Lyman Stone’s schedule for immigration controls imposed in the United Kingdom on Caribbean migrants.
  • At the Planetary Society Blog, Emily Lakdawalla explains how scientists are keeping the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter in good stead despite its age.
  • At Roads and Kingdoms, Timi Siytangco explains the history of the Philippines through nine Filipino foods.
  • Drew Rowsome is impressed by the power of The Assassination of Gianni Versace.
  • Ethan Siegel at Starts With A Bang explains why black holes have to contain singularities, not merely superdense normal matter.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the rather misogynistic essay of ideologue Vladimir Surkin about women and power, timed for Valentine’s Day.
Advertisements

[PHOTO] Fourteen photos from “Florine Stettheimer: Painting Poetry” (@agotoronto, #stettheimerago)

Before I begin systematically posting my photos of New York, I will need to finish up my Toronto posts. It is fitting that I will be starting with some paintings from an exhibit at the Art Gallery of Ontario of the works of Florine Stettheimer, Florine Stettheimer: Painting Poetry. In the early 20th century, this woman, part of a German Jewish family, set to documenting herself and her contained world of family and salons with her delicate and witty works. I can see why Andy Warhol so liked her.

Murray Whyte’s November article from the Toronto Star provides a useful perspective on Florine Stettheimer, her world, and her enduring bubbling under popularity.

"Florine Stettheimer: Painting Poetry" #toronto #artgalleryofontario #florinestettheimer #stettheimerago

"Head of Medusa (Head of Ettie Stettheimer as Medusa)", 1908 or 1909  #toronto #artgalleryofontario #florinestettheimer #stettheimerago

Portrait of a Woman With Red Hair, 1900s  #toronto #artgalleryofontario #florinestettheimer #stettheimerago

"Fourth of July, Number One", 1927  #toronto #artgalleryofontario #florinestettheimer #stettheimerago #fourthofjuly

"Family Portrait I", 1915 #toronto #artgalleryofontario #florinestettheimer #stettheimerago

"Family Portrait II", 1933 #toronto #artgalleryofontario #florinestettheimer #stettheimerago

"Portrait of Louis Bouché", 1923 #toronto #artgalleryofontario #florinestettheimer #stettheimerago #louisbouche

"Spring Sale at Bendel's", 1921 #toronto #artgalleryofontario #florinestettheimer #stettheimerago #bendels

"Beauty Contest: To the Memory of P.T. Barnum", 1924 #toronto #artgalleryofontario #florinestettheimer #stettheimerago #newjersey

"Portrait of Marcel Duchamp", around 1920-1925 #toronto #artgalleryofontario #florinestettheimer #stettheimerago #marcelduchamp

"Portrait of My Sister, Ettie Stettheimer", 1923 #toronto #artgalleryofontario #florinestettheimer #stettheimerago #ettiestettheimer

"A Model", 1915 #toronto #artgalleryofontario #florinestettheimer #stettheimerago

"Self-Portrait with Paradise Birds", 1910 #toronto #artgalleryofontario #florinestettheimer #stettheimerago

"Self-Portrait with Palette (Painter and Faun)"", 1910s #toronto #artgalleryofontario #florinestettheimer #stettheimerago

Written by Randy McDonald

January 17, 2018 at 11:15 am

[NEWS] Four Canadian politics links: Kathleen Wynne, Ontario minimum wage, NAFTA, Canada at the WTO

  • Bob Hepburn at the Toronto Star wonders if the unpopularity of Kathleen Wynne, Ontario premier, has anything to do with her being a woman. It does follow a Canadian pattern, sadly.
  • Bob Pittis notes at CBC that the Ontario minimum wage increase constitutes a fantastic economic experiment, potentially transformative for the entire country.
  • Would the withdrawal threatened by Trump from NAFTA constitute a bargaining tactic? Global News suggests this is a real possibility.
  • Canada is bringing a wide-ranging challenge to US trade policies before the WTO, taking issue with more than two hundred examples of violations. This could be big. Jesse Snyder reports for the Financial Post.

Written by Randy McDonald

January 11, 2018 at 8:00 pm

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Architectuul considers the humanizing potential of brutalism in the context of a London filled with impersonal skyscrapers.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the ways the habitable-zone super-Earths of K2-18 reveal our solar system to be exceptional.
  • Centauri Dreams notes evidence for active plate tectonics in the ice crust of Europa, suggesting an ocean being replenished with nutrients and possibly suitable for life.
  • D-Brief notes the sourcing of the iron in the artifacts of the Bronze Act in meteorites.
  • Daily JSTOR reports on how Hollywood coped during the Red Scare of the 1950s.
  • Dangerous Minds notes the exciting discovery of tapes recording Devo jamming with David Bowie and Brian Eno.
  • Cody Delistraty considers if the restitution of artworks looted from once-colonized territories might not be a cheap substitute for deeper changes.
  • Language Hat shares a student essay comparing, during the First World War, the United States’ campaign against German and the German campaign against French.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money argues against a British nostalgia for monarchy and empire that overlooks the real injustices perpetrated at Britain’s imperial peak.
  • Lingua Franca notes the remarkable power of the #metoo movement.
  • The LRB Blog notes the exceptional complexity of the issue of Jerusalem, especially after Trump’s actions.
  • The Map Room Blog shares links to a variety of maps of the Halifax Explosion and its effects.
  • The NYR Daily looks at some of the legacies of the Salvadoran civil war.
  • Peter Watts makes an argument in favour of the dystopia in contemporary science fiction.
  • The Planetary Society Blog’s Emily Lakdawalla reports that South Korea is planning its first Moon expedition for 2020.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that Argentina, at its peak, offered as good or even better chances for social mobility for immigrants than the United States.
  • Peter Rukavina shares a photograph showing the electronic system used by defunct Charlottetown nightclub Myron’s for dispensing drinks.
  • Towleroad reports on one consequence of Australia’s acceptance of gay marriage: Will Calvin Harris remix the Spice Girls song “2 Become 1”, as he promised?
  • Window on Eurasia shares a list of eight reasons explaining why Finland was unique in the former Russian Empire in maintaining its independence from Moscow.

[NEWS] Five links about the École Polytechnique massacre

  • Yasmin Jiwani writes at The Conversation about how the École Polytechnique massacre of 1989 fits into a wider context of misogyny.
  • CBC profiles Erin Hogg, a retired nurse who has kept a tradition of making and wearing white ribbons in memory of the dead of the École Polytechnique going.
  • Anne Thériault writes about how the École Polyechnique massacre illustrates the need to recognize gender and misogyny directly, over at MacLean’s.
  • The Toronto Star reports on commemorations in Ontario of the École Polytechnique massacre.
  • Morgan Lowrie reports for the Canadian Press about the latest presentation of the Order of the Rose scholarship, granted to women continuing their studies in engineering, over at The Globe and Mail.

Written by Randy McDonald

December 6, 2017 at 6:30 pm

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about two days recently spent in Washington D.C. I would like to go there myself, I think, and for more than a quick bus transfer in the night.
  • Crooked Timber considers what the upper classes of the United States are getting from the new tax cuts.
  • Daily JSTOR considers the ethics of having the art of Banksy displayed in the occupied West Bank. Is it ethical?
  • Far Outliers notes the impact of missionary organizations on the US Peace Corps.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas notes that the “we” used in talk about technology does not include everyone, that it is a selective “we.”
  • Imageo shares satellite imagery of the Arctic suggesting this winter in North America will be a harsh one.
  • Language Hat links to an article noting the dialect of English that refugees on the Greek island of Lesbos have developed.
  • The LRB Blog shares a report of a visit to the Estonian National Museum, and a reflection on the mythology of nationhood.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper claiming legalized abortion, not birth control, played the leading role in the emancipation of American women.
  • The NYR Daily notes the cult of personality surrounding Obama.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders what happened to the Afro-Argentines, numerous until the 19th century.
  • Drew Rowsome notes a reading of the classic gay Canadian play Fortune and Men’s Eyes, scheduled for the 11th at Buddies in Bad Times.
  • Window on Eurasia links to a scholarly examination of the Soviet annexation of once-independent Tannu Tuva, back in 1944.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Centauri Dreams takes a look at how stellar winds from red dwarfs complicate the habitability of planets in their circumstellar habitable zones.
  • The Crux, noting the 75th anniversary of the atomic age, notes some non-nuclear weapons achievements of this era.
  • D-Brief notes the exceptional strength of prehistoric women farmers.
  • Daily JSTOR takes a look at the instantaneity and power–frightening power, even–of celebrity culture in an era where technology gives us access to the intimate details of their lives.
  • Far Outliers notes that Pearl Buck, American author and missionary in China, actually was egalitarian and feminist.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas considers all those texts created in the past, of importance then and relevant even now, which have been forgotten. How can the canon be restored?
  • Imageo shares photos of the eruption of Mount Agung, in Bali.
  • Language Hat notes the intense interest of Roman Italy in all things Egyptian, including hieroglyphics. Where, exactly, was the like European interest in the cultures it colonized more recently?
  • Language Log tries to find people who can identify the source language of a particular text. It seems Turkic …
  • Lingua France talks about Robert Luis Stevenson and his opinions (and the blogger’s) about the weather of Edinburgh.
  • Lovesick Cyborg notes the seriously destabilizing potential of roboticization on human employment. To what extent can improving education systems help?
  • Tariq Ali at the LRB Blog talks about the latest religious-political crisis in Pakistan.
  • The Map Room Blog links to an article describing a Vietnamese historian’s search for cartographic proof of his country’s claims in the South China Sea.
  • The NYR Daily considers an interesting question: how, exactly, do you get an actor to act naturally for film? What strategies do filmmakers use?
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes a new genetic study hinting at a much greater survival of indigenous populations–women, at least–in Argentina than was previously suspected.
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes an interesting effort to try to preserve and restore the older districts of Kabul.
  • Seriously Science notes the exploration of the microbial life populating the coffee machine sludge of some inquisitive scientists.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that substantially Russian-populated northern Kazakhstan is at risk of becoming a new Russian target, especially after Nazarbayev goes.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares some thoughts on people of colour and the LGBTQ rainbow flag.