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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘finland

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about her favourite things in New York City.
  • Centauri Dreams features an essay by Nick Nielsen arguing in favour of manned spaceflight.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes the unusual chemical composition of the debris disk of HD 34700.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes Finland’s interest in a guaranteed minimum income.
  • Language Log notes the complexities of Wenzhou dialect.
  • Languages of the World shares an old post on the Roma and their language.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that prison rape in the United States is a real thing.
  • pollotenchegg looks at birth rate trends in Ukraine over 2013-2015.
  • Savage Minds notes the difficulties of life as an anthropologist.
  • Torontoist notes a dance festival in Seaton Village.
  • Towleroad notes the Illinois ban on gay conversion therapy.
  • Transit Toronto looks at the TTC’s service in the time of the Canadian National Exhibition.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at a Ukrainian nationalist criticism of Ukrainian policy after independence, and suggests that fear of a Russian nationalist backlash might lead to a Russian annexation of Donbas.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • At Alpha Sources, Claus Vistesen links to his podcast wherein he argues that too much blame is being placed on the IMF.
  • blogTO notes a documentary on a CBC prop warehouse.
  • City of Brass celebrates the Fourth of July and the end of Ramadan.
  • Crooked Timber is scathing about the IMF, the European Union, and Syriza.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper that studies Gliese 229B, one of the nearest and first-found brown dwarfs.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that half of the banded iron formations extant on Earth are products of microbes.
  • Geocurrents notes how non-inevitable the Saudi state was within its current borders.
  • Language Log looks at the use of Sinitic characters in modern Korea.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money tackles pea guacamole.
  • Marginal Revolution shares photos of an abandoned Soviet space shuttle.
  • Towleroad notes that Cuba has managed to halt mother-to-child transmission of HIV and syphillis.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the anti-Ukrainian slur Khokhol’s unacceptability, looks at controversy over national textbooks in Tatarstan, and examines a dying Finnish-language magazine in Karelia.
  • The Financial Times‘ The World warns of radical Islam among Albanians.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • blogTO notes the heavy level of pollution in Toronto Harbour following recent rains, and suggests Toronto is set to get gigabit Internet speeds.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about her recent vacation in Donegal.
  • Centauri Dreams revisits Robert L. Forward’s Starwisp probe.
  • Crooked Timber speculates that there is hope for rapid action on climate change.
  • The Dragon’s Tales reports on an inflated hot Jupiter orbiting a F-class star.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares a vintage supercomputer pamphlet.
  • Far Outliers looks at the collapse of the Comanche empire in the 1860s.
  • Language Log looks at the controversial English test in France.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reacts to an overly broad pulling of computer games with Confederate flags.
  • Steve Munro reacts to the state of streetcar switches.
  • Torontoist looks at a queer art exhibition at Bay and Wellesley on sex ed.
  • Towleroad shares a straight-married Scottish bishop’s tale of same-sex love.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes that remembering the Civil War does not requite keeping the Confederate flag.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how few Crimeans identify with Russia and looks at Finnish, Estonian, and Hungarian influence on Russia’s Finno-Ugric minorities.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • blogTO shares some wacky and unusual maps of the Toronto subway system.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly describes her reason why she did not want to have children.
  • Gerry Canavan has another post of links.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at Earth-like planets with circumbinary orbits and considers a new model of gas giant formation that explains Jupiter.
  • Crooked Timber examines the ongoing controversy over the Hugo awards for science fiction, as captured by American right-wing authors.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining the habitability of water worlds.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes the delay of China’s Mars exploration program.
  • Far Outliers looks at different systems for representing vowels with consonant symbols in the languages of the Pacific Islands.
  • Geocurrents has some posts–1, 2, 3–looking at ways in which the state system does not reflect the reality of the Middle East.
  • Language Hat looks at the revival of Manx.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that the United States’ Endangered Species Act is important for saving not just individual species but entire ecosystems.
  • Marginal Revolution tells readers how to find good Iranian food.
  • Steve Munro is dubious about the economics of the Union-Pearson Express.
  • pollotenchegg looks at changing industrial production in Ukraine in 2013, finding that the east was doing poorly.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks at the military situation in eastern Ukraine.
  • Cheri Lucas Rowlands shares beautiful pictures of Bermuda.
  • Peter Rukavina continues mapping airplanes flying above Prince Edward Island.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog reports on the results of the famine in 1930s Ukraine.
  • Window on Eurasia argues that the Belarusian language is still endangered, quotes a Putin confidant on eastern Ukraine’s separation, looks at the impact of the Internet on Karelia, and looks at ethnogenesis as two small nations of the North Caucasus merge.

[DM] “Is Finland’s Economy Suffering From Secular Stagnation?”

Co-blogger Edward Hugh, first writing at A Fistful of Euros and there getting noticed at Marginal Revolution, has now reposted at Demography Matters his essay on the intersection between Finland’s aging population (complete with shrinking workforce) and its economic issues.

Go, read.

Written by Randy McDonald

April 1, 2015 at 3:19 am

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Alpha Sources’ Claus Vistesen argues that as a result of various factors including shrinking populations, economic bubbles are going to be quite likely.
  • blogTO argues that Toronto’s strip clubs are in trouble.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly wonders who is going to pay for journalism in the future.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at ringed Centaur objects.
  • Crooked Timber’s Daniel Davies describes his family’s recent experience in New Zealand. Want to find out how the Maori are like the Welsh?
  • D-Brief notes the return of wood bison to the United States.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper suggesting Alpha Centauri Bb is a superdense world.
  • The Dragon’s Tales note Indonesia’s upset with Chinese claims to the South China Sea.
  • Far Outliers reports on how NGOs feed corruption in Cambodia.
  • Language Hat links to a gazetteer of placenames in Jamaica.
  • Language Log’s Victor Mair looks at some Sino-English constructions.
  • Marginal Revolution points to its collection of Singapore-related posts.
  • The Planetary Society Blog considers Cassini‘s footage of Saturn’s F ring.
  • The Power and the Money hosts Will Baird’s argument that the Ukrainian east will soon see an explosion of violence.
  • Spacing Toronto and Torontoist look at the architectural competition for the Toronto Islands ferry terminal.
  • Torontoist reports on Martin Luther King’s 1962 visit to Toronto.
  • Towleroad notes a raging syphillis epidemic among gay men in New York City’s Chelsea neighbourhood.
  • Window on Eurasia notes changes in the Islam of Tatarstan, notes Russia’s transition towards totalitarianism, observes Russian claims of Finnish meddling in Karelia, and looks at polls suggesting Ukrainians fear Russia but do not trust the European Union.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell describes what seems to have been a shambolic attempt to co-opt the English Defense League somehow. (I don’t understand it. All I can figure out is that.

[LINK] “Russian Karelia looks to the past and future”

In the South China Morning Post, Daniel Allen has a long and thoughtful essay on the now largely Russian-controlled borderland of Karelia. I’m left very much with the impression of a Finnic past and a Russian future for this territory.

Below his snow-dusted shapka hat, Anatoliy Vasiljev’s rheumy eyes peer through a pair of fogged-up spectacles.

In Rubchoila village, about 80km west of Petrozavodsk, capital of the Russian Republic of Karelia, the sun’s faint orb hangs low in the December sky. Stepping out into the biting cold, the septuagenarian pulls his hat a little lower, buttons up a red tunic and begins tramping down the lane of packed snow that forms Rubchoila’s main street.

Vasiljev is Russian, Karelian and passionate about the preservation of the region’s traditional culture.

“This soil on which you are walking has been fought over for centuries,” he says, stopping beside an ornate wooden cottage. “Karelia is often described as a battlefield lying between East and West. And, for some people, the struggle over Karelia still goes on.”

Straddling 700 km of the border between Russia and Finland, Karelia covers more than 260,000 square kilometres. With its myriad lakes (Ladoga and Onega are the two largest lakes in Europe), roaring cascades and huge swathes of birch, pine and spruce forest, this is a beautiful land. It is also home to a Finno-Ugric people whose history is among the most tumultuous in Europe.

“With Karelia continually criss-crossed by shifting borders, the Karelians have never really enjoyed a unified homeland,” says Marina Tsherbak, head of public relations at the Karelian State Museum of Local History, in Petrozavodsk. “Rich in resources [such as iron ore and diamonds], their territory has been fought over for centuries, by Russians, Swedes and Finns. Living on the crossroads between Europe and Russia has brought the Karelians much strife and suffering.”

Written by Randy McDonald

March 7, 2015 at 12:38 am

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