A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘finland

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • blogTO notes that the cash-strapped CBC may be forced to sell its iconic downtown Toronto headquarters.
  • James Bow reflects on winter in Kitchener-Waterloo.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper studying the relationship between exoplanets and circumstellar dust discs.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to a simulation of the polar atmosphere of Venus and notes concerns that India’s Hindustan Aeronautics might not be able to manufacture French Rafale fighters under contract.
  • Far Outliers notes Madeleine Albright’s incomprehension of Cambodia’s late 1990s struggles and looks at the way the country lags its neighbours.
  • The Frailest Thing notes how human traffic errors reveal we’re not quite up to some of the tasks we’d like.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Finland’s president has signed a marriage bill into existence.
  • Languages of the World notes the problem of where the homeland of the Indo-Europeans was located.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the often-ignored pattern of lynching Mexicans in the United States.
  • Marginal Revolution notes (1, 2) the problems of human beings with algorithmic, computer-driven planning.
  • Otto Pohl notes how Germans in Kyrgyzstan were forced into labour battalions.
  • pollotenchegg looks at demographic indicators in Ukraine over the past year, noting a collapse in the east.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks at deep history, looking at the involvement of war in state-building in Africa and noting the historically recent rise of inequality in Latin America.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at one Russian’s proposal to give a Ukrainian church self-government, notes Russia’s inability to serve as a mentor to China, and looks at rural depopulation in the North Caucasus and South Russia.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • blogTO notes that Stollery’s at Yonge and Bloor could be demolished soon.
  • Centauri Dreams notes</a that gyrochronology–using a star’s spin rate to calculate its age–works.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze looks at the spacing of planets in exosystems.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that dogs crossed into the Americas only ten thousand years ago.
  • Joe. My. God. notes how Europeans overestimate the size of their Muslim populations.
  • Lanugage Hat considers the question of Timur’s languages.
  • The Planetary Society Blog explores the ESA’s upcoming JUICE probe to Europa.
  • Otto Pohl finds links between Soviet mistreatment of ethnic Germans and South African apartheid.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog notes that Chinese are moving en masse to Africa, not Siberia.
  • Towleroad shares video of a crowd bursting into singing John Lennon’s “Imagine” at the recent Paris march.
  • Transit Toronto notes the toll of extreme cold on streetcars.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes that Pride and Prejudice recently got cited in the US Supreme Court.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi reflects on a cat and his box.
  • Window on Eurasia reflects on the vissicitudes of Karelian identity, ethnic and political, in Russia.
  • The Financial Times‘ World blog notes that reconciliation is still far off in the former Yugoslavia.

[LINK] “Finland legalises gay marriage”

The Guardian shares the good news.

The Finnish parliament has narrowly approved a citizen’s initiative to legalise same-sex marriage.

Gay couples in Finland have been able to enter into registered partnerships since 2002, but until now the country was the only in the Nordic region not to allow same-sex marriage. Finland is now the 12th European state to do so.

In the vote, 105 members of parliament supported the legal amendment while 92 opposed it.

The measure will end the distinction in Finland between same-sex unions and heterosexual marriages and give such couples equal rights to adopt children and share a surname.

Written by Randy McDonald

November 29, 2014 at 12:32 am

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • 3 Quarks Daily examines an effort to set up an arts and culture centre in Karachi.
  • Alpha Sources’ Claus Vistesen wonders if another Eurozone crisis is looming in the near future.
  • blogTO reports on Olivia Chow’s call for an apartment building rating system akin to that of restaurant ratings.
  • The Dragon’s Tales links to a paper speculating on reasons for the very odd surface of Uranus’ moon Miranda.
  • Far Outliers looks at the issues facing early baseball radio broadcasting.
  • Joe. My. God. and Towleroad both note a Russian lawmaker’s call to ban the entry of mail carrying Finland’s popular Tom of Finland-themed stamps.
  • Language Hat considers the origins of the term “prehistory”.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes discrimination against pregnant workers.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer considers grounds to believe that a continued British North America including the United States would not have been a success. The survival of intercolonial trade barriers would be an issue.
  • The Speed River Journal’s Van Waffle photoblogs his close encounter with a red fox.
  • Window on Eurasia notes speculation about a partition of Crimea, considers the need for more surveys of Russian territory to look for natural resources, and observes that Ukrainian refugees resettled in the autonomous republics of Russia aren’t required to learn local languages.

[LINK] Three classics Geocurrent posts at Languages of the World: Birobidzhan, Karelia, Crimea

Over at Languages of the World, Asya Perelstvaig has been reposting some of her old Geocurrents posts. Three I particularly like involve Birobidzhan, the attempted Jewish homeland in Soviet Siberia, the Russian-Finnish borderlands including Karelia, and the history of the Crimean Tatars.

Written by Randy McDonald

October 9, 2014 at 8:29 pm

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • blogTO shares pictures and photos of Toronto overhead from 1879 on, noting the ever-rising skyline.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the fascinating results of an in-depth study of the emerging planetary system of HD100546.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper looking at causes for orbital eccentricty of planets in trinary systems.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes the current state of eastern Ukraine and notes that Australia’s Lynch Crater apparently conserves records of forty-five thousand years of human influence on the global environment.
  • Joe. My. God. observes that Finland’s Tom of Finland-themed stamps are a huge hit.
  • The Planetary Society Blog charts patterns of growth of planetary exploration by probe over 1959-1989.
  • pollotenchegg examines ethnically-driven patterns of support in Belarus’ last free elections.
  • Spacing Toronto reviews the 2014 State of the World.
  • Supernova Condensate shares pictures of the Space Cats.
  • Towleorad notes that Toronto school trustee Sam Sotiropoulous shuts down when asked on television about his transphobic and homophobic statements.
  • Why I Love Toronto notes that Toronto’s new streetcars are great.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that on economic issues Putin is not Marxist but rather statist, and observes the long-term consequences of the utter breakdown in Russian-Ukrainian relations.

[NEWS] Some Tuesday links

  • Al Jazeera notes the breakdown of the Libyan state.
  • Bloomberg mentions Finland’s new interest in NATO, notes European Union plans to strengthen sanctions against Russia, takes note of China’s vetoing of democracy in Hong Kong and looks at China’s strengthening of its South China Sea holdings, and in West Africa notes the unburied bodies in the street in countries hit by Ebola and observes the apparent spread of the epidemic to Senegal.
  • Bloomberg View observes how the crackdown on democracy in Hong Kong is alienating Taiwan, notes that Scotland may secure its future in the European Union by leaving a United Kingdom hoping to leave, looks at the frightening military theories of Russia, considers whether taxation may spur corporate consumption in Korea, wonders if France’s Hollande can pull off Mitterand’s turn to the right, examines secular stagnation, considers the issues of Macau, and warns Israel about economic issues ahead.
  • CBC looks at how walking bichir fish may explain how vertebrates moved onto the land, notes that Canadian federal government roundtables on the sex trade aren’t inviting sex workers, and notes that convicted serial killer Russell Williams has settled lawsuits made by some victims and their families.
  • Defense One notes that the Islamic State controls mainly areas around roads (but then, the roads are usually the areas that are controlled).
  • The Inter Press Service examines the settlement of Somalian refugees in Istanbul, considers the future of Ukrainian agriculture, looks at the spread of jihadi sentiments in Tajikistan, points out that the United States and Brazil will soon improve genetically engineered trees, examines anti-gay persecution in Lebanon, and looks at the legacies of the balsero migration from Cuba 20 years later.
  • National Geographic examines the positions of Yazidis in northern Iraq versus the Islamic State, notes the mobilizatin of Assyrian Christian refugees in the same region, and notes that more trees in the mountains of California means less run-off.
  • Open Democracy notes the precedents for Russian policy in Ukraine two decades earlier in Bosnia-Herzegovina, and provides a critical tourist’s perspective on Belarus.
  • Universe Today notes an ancient star that preserves legacies of the first generation of stars to form, and observes the preparation for the landing of the Philae probe on the surface of its comet.
  • Wired examines sriracha and maps where future roads should be placed.
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