A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘first nations

[META] On the latest blogroll expansion

leave a comment »

Consider this post a consequence of a consolidation of my blogroll, with three posts from older blogs I’ve added previously and two new posts from new blogs.

  • Missing persons blog Charley Ross shares the strange story of five people who went missing in a winter wilderness in 1978.
  • Roads and Kingdom shares an anecdote by Alessio Perrone about a chat over a drink with a Cornishman, in a Cornwall ever more dependent on tourism.
  • Strange Company shares the story of Kiltie, a Scottish cat who immigrated to the United States in the First World War.
  • Starts With a Bang, a science blog by Ethan Siegel, argues that there is in fact no evidence for periodic mass extinctions caused by bodies external to the Earth.
  • Worthwhile Canadian Initiative, a group blog by Canadian economists, considers the value placed on Aboriginal language television programming.

[LINK] Four links on First Nations and their issues in Canada

leave a comment »

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

leave a comment »

  • Apostrophen’s ‘Nathan Smith points to his blog post about the strengths of the chosen families of queer people, in life and in his fiction.
  • Beyond the Beyond’s Bruce Sterling revisits the politics behind France’s Minitel network, archaic yet pioneering.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly blogs about meeting her online friends in real life. Frankly, it would never occur to me not to do that.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at how Kepler’s exoplanets fall neatly into separate classes, super-Earths and mini-Neptunes.
  • The LRB Blog has a terrible report from Grenfell Tower, surrounded by betrayed survivors and apocalypse.
  • The Map Room Blog notes the inclusion of Canada’s First Nations communities on Google Maps.
  • The NYRB Daily’s Robert Cottrell explores the banalities revealed by Oliver Stone’s interviews of Putin.
  • The Planetary Society Blog’s Jason Davis considers the likely gains and challenges associated with missions to the ice giants of Uranus and Neptune.
  • Towleroad notes the new Alan Cumming film After Louie, dealing with a romance between an ACT-UP survivor and a younger man
  • The Volokh Conspiracy’s Ilya Somin does not find much good coming from Trump’s announced Cuba policy.
  • Window on Eurasia warns about the threat posed by Orthodox Christian fundamentalists in Russia.

[URBAN NOTE] Four links about Toronto, from local racism to Airbnb to King Street streetcars

leave a comment »

  • Orville Lloyd Douglas is critical of Black Lives Matter on Pride, calling it out for being self-appointed representatives of black Canadians.
  • Alex McKeen writes in the Toronto Star about First Nations groups holding ongoing ceremonies in Queen’s Park.
  • Betsy Powell, also in the Star, notes new restrictions and licensing Toronto is set to impose on Airbnb locally.
  • CBC notes that King Street is slated to become a street where transit, particularly streetcars, will have priority over other traffic.

Written by Randy McDonald

June 12, 2017 at 3:30 pm

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

leave a comment »

  • Crooked Timber enthuses over the remixing, or remastering, of arguably the Beatles’ most iconic album.
  • Far Outliers notes the Albanian language’s alphabet struggles in the wider geopolitics of Albania.
  • Joe. My. God. notes an American soccer player opted to quit rather than to wear a Pride jersey.
  • Language Hat notes a new online atlas of Algonquian languages.
  • The NYRB Daily argues that Theresa May’s election defeat makes the fantasy of a hard Brexit, at least, that much less possible.
  • Window on Eurasia notes Russia’s concern at the dissipation of the prestige of its language and script in its former empire, especially in Ukraine.

[NEWS] Ten links, from human evolution through cultural diversity to the Toronto Islands

leave a comment »

  • The Atlantic‘s Ed Yong notes the discovery of dated Homo sapiens fossils 300k years old in Morocco. (!)
  • The Atlantic reports on Twitter-driven science that has highlighted the remarkable visual acuity of the spider.
  • The Economist notes that multilingual societies can encounter more difficulties prospering than unilingual ones.
  • Torontoist notes a Thunder Bay park devoted to the idea of First Nations reconciliation.
  • The Inter Press Service reports on how gardens grown under solar tents in Bolivia can improve nutrition in poor highland villages.
  • The Toronto Star‘s Christopher Hume trolls Rob Ford’s supporters over the new, well-designed, Etobicoke Civic Centre.
  • Metro Toronto calculates just how many avocado toasts would go into a mortgage in the GTA.
  • MacLean’s hosts a collection of twenty photos from gritty Niagara Falls, New York.
  • The National Post shows remarkable, heartbreaking photos from the flooded Toronto Islands.
  • Edward Keenan argues that the Toronto Islands’ flooding should help prompt a local discussion on climate change.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

leave a comment »

  • Crooked Timber responds to The Intercept’s release of data regarding Russian interference with American elections.
  • Dangerous Minds reports on how Melanie Gaydos overcame a rare genetic disorder to become a model.
  • Dead Things seems unduly happy that it does seem as if Tyrannosaurus rex had feathers. (I like the idea.)
  • The Dragon’s Gaze reports on our ability to detect the effects of a planet-shattering Nicoll-Dyson beam.
  • The Frailest Thing considers being a parent in the digital age.
  • Language Hat notes the African writing systems of nsibidi and bamum.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that Trump-supporting states are moving to green energy quite quickly.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Russian guarantees of traditional rights to the peoples of the Russian North do not take their current identities into account.