A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘first nations

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Anthropology.net’s Kambiz Kamrani looks at the classical Mayan trade in pets, dogs and cats particularly.
  • Dangerous Minds shares some vintage cheesecake ads for video and arcade games from 1980s Japan.
  • Dead Things considers an examination of the thesis that the fabulous horns of some dinosaurs were used as sexual signals.
  • Hornet Stories nominates some queer people to get stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.
  • JSTOR Daily tells the story of Bobbi Gibb, the woman who in 1966 crashed the Boston Marathon.
  • Language Hattells of Toty Samed, an Angolan musician who writes songs not in the now-dominant Portuguese but in his ancestral Kimbundu.
  • Steven Attewell at Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the ways in which the metaphor of mutants has been used by Marvel Comics to explore themes of racism and marginalization.
  • At the LRB Blog, Matthew Porges notes how European Union opposition to the annexation of Western Sahara by Morocco is counterbalanced by the need to keep Morocco as a partner.
  • r/mapporn shared a beautiful map of the Great Lakes, Nayanno-Nibiimaang Gichigamiin or “The Five Freshwater Seas”, from the Ojibwe perspective.
  • The Map Room Blog shares Christian Tate’s transit-style map of Middle Earth.
  • Marginal Revolution links to an essay arguing against the United States’ dropping the penny and the nickel, on the grounds that these expensive coins are loss-leaders for currency generally.
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at early 20th century Russian philosopher Ivan Ilyan, a man whose influence is visible in the Putin era.
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at the eye-catching male photography of Ekaterina Zakharova.
  • David Post’s analysis at the Volokh Conspiracy of the contract between Stormy Daniels and Donald Trump is a must-read.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the Russian government has failed to cultivate soft power, or wider influence, in the West.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • At Anthrodendum, Elizabeth Marino takes issue with what she identifies as the naively and fiercely neoliberal elements of Steven Pinker’s Enlightenment Now.
  • Anthropology.net’s Kambiz Kamrani takes a look at an innovative study of the Surinamese creole of Sranan Tongo that uncovers that language’s linguistic origins in remarkably fine detail.
  • Architectuul examines the architecture of Communist-era Hungarian architect István Szábo
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the nearly naked black hole at the heart of galaxy ZwCl 8193, 2.2 billion light-years away.
  • The Big Picture shares photos from the 2018 Paralympics in South Korea.
  • Gerry Canavan has an interesting critical take on Star Trek: Discovery. Is it really doing new things, or is its newness just superficial?
  • Centauri Dreams considers the impact the spectra of red dwarfs would have on biosignatures from their worlds.
  • Russell Darnley takes a look at Australia’s Darling River, a critical watercourse threatened by extensive water withdrawals.
  • Inkfish notes that patterns of wear on the tusks of elephants indicate most are right-handed.
  • Joe. My. God. links to a study suggesting a relationship between Trump rallies and violent assaults.
  • JSTOR Daily links to a paper examining why people drink Guinness on St. Patrick’s Day.
  • Language Hat takes a look at the use of Xhosa as the language of Wakanda.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money mourns Alfred Crosby, the historian whose work examined the epidemiological and ecological changes wrought by contact with the Americas.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a map showing indigenous placenames in Canada.
  • In the aftermath of the death of Stephen Hawking, Out There had a lovely idea: what nearby major stars emitted life than arrive at the moment of his birth? Hawking’s star is Regulus, and mine was (nearly) Arcturus.
  • Marginal Revolution suggests AI will never be able to centrally plan an economy because the complexity of the economy will always escape it.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel examines Stephen Hawking’s contribution to the study of black holes.
  • Supernova Condensate shares a list of moons, fictional and otherwise, from Endor on down.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • At Anthropology.net, Kamzib Kamrani looks at the Yamnaya horse culture of far eastern Europe and their connection to the spread of the Indo-Europeans.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the predicted collision of China’s Tiangong-1 space station. Where will it fall?
  • James Bow notes a Kickstarter funding effort to revive classic Canadian science fiction magazine Amazing Stories.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the impending retirement of the pioneering Kepler telescope, and what’s being done in the time before this retirement.
  • D-Brief notes how nanowires made of gold and titanium were used to restore the sight of blind mice.
  • Russell Darnley takes a look at the indigenous people of Riau province, the Siak, who have been marginalized by (among other things) the Indonesian policy of transmigration.
  • Dead Things reports on more evidence of Denisovan ancestry in East Asian populations, with the suggestion that the trace of Denisovan ancestry in East Asia came from a different Denisovan population than the stronger traces in Melanesia.
  • Hornet Stories paints a compelling portrait of the West Texas oasis-like community of Marfa.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how indigenous mythology about illness was used to solve a hantavirus outbreak in New Mexico in the 1990s.
  • Language Log praises the technical style of a Google Translate translation of a text from German to English.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that, under the Shah, Iran was interested in building nuclear plants. Iranian nuclear aspirations go back a long way.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the unsettling elements of the literary, and other, popularity of Jordan Peterson.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the continuing existence of a glass ceiling even in relatively egalitarian Iceland.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the unsettling elements behind the rise of Xi Jinping to unchecked power. Transitions from an oligarchy to one-man rule are never good for a country, never mind one as big as China.
  • Drew Rowsome writes about Love, Cecil, a new film biography of photographer Cecil Beaton.
  • Peter Rukavina celebrates the 25th anniversary of his move to Prince Edward Island. That province, my native one, is much the better for his having moved there. Congratulations!
  • Window on Eurasia looks at a strange story of Russian speculation about Kazakh pan-Turkic irredentism for Orenburg that can be traced back to one of its own posts.
  • At Worthwhile Canadian Initiative, Frances Woolley takes the time to determine that Canadian university professors tend to be more left-wing than the general Canadian population, and to ask why this is the case.

[PHOTO] Five Pre-Columbian artifacts, four in gold and one in silver (@metmuseum)

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The skill of the metalworkers of pre-Columbian Colombia and Peru, capable of making gold and silver into such intricate and diverse shapes, really impressed me when we were walking through this gallery at the Met.

Made of hammered gold #newyorkcity #newyork #manhattan #metmuseum #colombia #gold #hammeredgold #latergram

Flying fish pendants #newyorkcity #newyork #manhattan #metmuseum #colombia #gold #pendants #latergram

Dance wands #newyorkcity #newyork #manhattan #metmuseum #peru #gold #hammeredgold #nasca #latergram

Funerary mask #newyorkcity #newyork #manhattan #metmuseum #peru #gold #hammeredgold #sican #latergram

Disk (shield cover) #newyorkcity #newyork #manhattan #metmuseum #peru #silver #chimu #latergram

Written by Randy McDonald

March 14, 2018 at 10:45 am

[NEWS] Five notes on food: pork in Germany, California agriculture, NL clam, Maine lobster, food box

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  • Pork consumption in Germany is dropping, a consequence of changing demographics and changing dietary preferences. Bloomberg reports.
  • Raids on illegal immigrants by ICE have the potential to badly hurt agriculture in California. Bloomberg reports.
  • The story of how an effort to open up the Arctic surf clam fishery of Newfoundland, particularly to natives and non-natives alike became a big mess is sad. The National Post reports.
  • Apparently, to cope with injuries and chronic pain, the lobster fishers of Maine are coping by using heroin. Is this going on in Atlantic Canada, too? VICE reports.
  • Things like the Trump plan to substantially replace fresh foods with boxed non-perishable goods in food stamp problems have happened to Native Americans already. The dietary and health consequences are significantly negative. NPR reports.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: Yoko Ono, cars, St. Clair, York Region, First Nations, Quayside

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  • At NOW Toronto, local artist Jean Yoon reviews Yoko Ono’s new conceptual work The Riverbed, currently being exhibited at the Gardiner.
  • John Rieti at CBC notes the oddness of an observation by mayor John Tory that it is rare for parents in Toronto to not own a car.
  • Transit Toronto notes the installation of beacons to guide the blind at St. Clair station.
  • Apparently York Region’s school board does not pay students’ foster families enough. CBC reports.
  • A new study suggests that First Nations people in Toronto experience above-average levels of poverty and hunger. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Developers of a huge office-dominated complex in planned for emergent Quayside are seeking funding. The Toronto Star reports.
  • blogTO has a cute little item noting how author Elan Mastai is promoting his new book using the Little Free Libraries of Toronto.

[NEWS] Five language links: Inuktitut, Icelandic, Ladino, Spanish, isiXhosa

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  • I entirely agree with the argument of Aluki Kotierk, writing at MacLean’s, who thinks the Inuit of Nunavut have been entirely too passive, too nice, in letting Inuktitut get marginalized. Making it a central feature in education is the least that can be done. (Québec-style language policies work.)
  • Although ostensibly a thriving language in many domains of life, the marginalization of the Icelandic language in the online world could be an existential threat. The Guardian reports.
  • As part of a bid to keep alive Ladino, traditional language of the Sephardic Jews, Spain has extended to the language official status including support and funding. Ha’aretz reports.
  • A new set of policies of Spain aiming at promoting the Spanish language have been criticized by some in Hispanic American states, who call the Spanish moves excessively unilateral. El Pais reports.
  • isiXhosa, the language of the Xhosa people of South Africa, is getting huge international attention thanks to its inclusion in Black Panther. The Toronto Star reports.