A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘first nations

[ISL] Four links from islands, from dividing Ireland, to the Chamorro and Haida, to the Caribbean

leave a comment »

  • Peter Geoghegan writes at Open Democracy about the mess that Brexit has made of Ireland, two decades after the Troubles’ end.
  • Anthrodendum’s Alex Golub notes that a North Korean attack on Guam, among other things, would threaten the Chamorro natives of the island.
  • The Toronto Star carries an excerpt from a book by Mark Dowie looking at how the Haida, of Haida Gwaii, managed to win government recognition of their existence.
  • CBC’s Sameer Chhabra explores how Canadian students at Caribbean medical schools find it very difficult to get jobs back home.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

leave a comment »

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the emergent evidence for exomoon Kepler-1625b-I.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the future of technological civilizations: what if they do not always ascend, but stagnate?
  • D-Brief takes issue with the idea of the “digital native.” Everyone needs to adopt new technology at some point.
  • Are Elon Musk and Space-X backing away from the Mars colony plans? The Dragon’s Tales notes.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a map of massacres of Aborigines on the Australian frontiers.
  • Marginal Revolution wonders if widespread roboticization really will increase productivity much.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on the traditional rum of Newfoundland.
  • Drew Rowsome likes a new Toronto show, Permanence, in part for its take on male sexuality and sexual presence.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog notes that Russia leads the world in cat ownership.
  • Strange Company reports on coin-collecting 1920 cat Peter Pan Wass.
  • Understanding Society takes a look at the potential conflicts between “contingency” and “explanation.”
  • The Volokh Conspiracy looks at how a Nassau County legislator wants to block a Roger Waters conconcert because of his support for an Israel boycott.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Chinese outnumber Jews in the Far East’s Jewish Autonomous Oblast. (Not many of both, mind.)

[URBAN NOTE] Five links on Toronto, from housing issues to renaming Ryerson

  • blogTO notes apartment complexes will soon be rezoned to allow them to host more businesses.
  • Torontoist’s Tamara Yelland argues against Matt Gurney’s dismissive take that people who can’t afford Toronto housing should go.
  • Global News reports on the bidding wars for condo rentals in Toronto.
  • At CBC, Doug George-Kanentiio argues in favour of renaming Ryerson University, perhaps giving it a First Nations name.
  • The Toronto Star‘s Martin Regg Cohn reflects on his experiences around the world, seeing statues to past regimes taken down.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • James Bow considers the idea of Christian privilege.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on the oddities of Ross 128.
  • D-Brief shares Matthew Buckley’s proposal that it is possible to make planets out of dark matter.
  • Dead Things reports on the discoveries at Madjedbebe, in northern Australia, suggesting humans arrived 65 thousand years ago.
  • Bruce Dorminey reports on the idea that advanced civilizations may use sunshades to protect their worlds from overheating. (For terraforming purposes, too.)
  • Language Hat notes the struggles of some Scots in coming up with a rationalized spelling for Scots. What of “hert”?
  • The LRB Blog considers the way in which the unlimited power of Henry VIII will be recapitulated post-Brexit by the UK government.
  • Drew Rowsome quite likes the High Park production of King Lear.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers the idea that Pluto’s moons, including Charon, might be legacies of a giant impact.
  • Unicorn Booty notes the terrible anti-trans “Civil Rights Uniformity Act.” Americans, please act.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy considers/u> the perhaps-unique way a sitting American president might be charged with obstruction of justice.

[NEWS] Seven links, from drugs in Germany to dolphin cuisine to dual nations in Australia

  • Johann Hari writes for Open Democracy about what may be the beginning of the end of the drug war in Germany.
  • I am not in agreement with Joseph Couture’s argument in NOW Toronto that the Internet has ended gay communities. (Convince me.)
  • Samantha Edwards reports in NOW Toronto controversy regarding the Parkdale feminist street art event. Was it really intersectional?
  • James Cooray Smith wonders–or “wonders”–why some Doctor Who fans are so upset with a woman portraying the Doctor.
  • In MacLean’s, chief Perry Bellegarde argues that more Canadians should be concerned with the too-many deaths of young First Nations people in Thunder Bay.
  • The National Post tells the story of how Australian senator Larissa Walters had to unexpectedly resign her position on account of her Canadian birth.
  • Via James Nicoll, a paper claiming evidence of human presence in northern Australia, in Madjedbebe, 65k years ago.
  • National Geographic tells of the peculiar way some Gulf of Mexico dolphins prepare their catfish. Is it cultural, culinary even?

[NEWS] Four links from Canada, from Sears Canada to the Avro Arrow to racism to First Nations

  • MacLean’s Joe Castaldo notes the case for Sears Canada giving executives retention bonuses even as it shorts lesser workers.
  • CBC notes another, potentially more successful, search for Avro Arrow models in the depths of Lake Ontario.
  • VICE notes the history of white supremacism in Canada, extending to the point of a failed coup by some in Dominica.
  • Spacing reports on the Indigenous Place Making Council, intended to secure a place for increasingly urban First Nations in Canada.

Written by Randy McDonald

July 16, 2017 at 5:30 pm

[URBAN NOTE] Four Toronto links, from marijuana laws to the AGO to Wattpad to laneway suites

  • What will happen to the legal records of those convicted of marijuana-related charges once legalization comes? The Toronto Star considers.
  • NOW Toronto reviews a new exhibit of First Nations-oriented work at the AGO.
  • NOW Toronto features an article showing how Toronto startup Wattpad is making celebrity fanfic (among other things) economically lucrative for writers.
  • Torontoist considers the idea of laneway suites as a way to deal with the city’s housing crisis.