A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘first nations

[ISL] Four islands links: Beothuk, Newfoundland outports, seasteading, Shetlands

leave a comment »

  • DNA tests of Beothuk remains reveal that the extinct group was related to neither Mi’kmaq nor Inuit. The Globe and Mail reports.
  • Some Newfoundland outports are seeing many young professionals move in, to make homes and businesses. CBC reports.
  • Marginal Revolution claims a group wanting to mount a seasteading effort off French Polynesia are getting close to their goals.
  • Politico.eu notes that, in the Shetlands, while fishers hope Brexit will lead to the revival of the fisheries others fear a labour shortage without EU-27 migrants.
Advertisements

[NEWS] Four pop culture links: art in Parkdale, Wanda Nanibush, Balkan media, Canadian Thanksgiving

leave a comment »

  • The way art helped build a stronger community in Parkdale is the subject of this NOW Toronto article.
  • The AGO has just landed a new curator of indigenous art, Anishinabe-kwe artist Wanda Nanibush.
  • Transitions Online notes how, under Communism, different Balkan peoples kept looking to a different west for entertainment.
  • MacLean’s looks at the history of Canadian Thanksgiving.

Written by Randy McDonald

October 13, 2017 at 4:00 pm

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: Rob Ford, decolonizing art, Humber Bay bus, Don Valley art, crime

leave a comment »

  • The National Post notes that Toronto city council voted against naming a stadium after the late Rob Ford.
  • blogTO notes that Humber Bay Shores wants to run a private neighbourhood bus service, for want of a TTC presence.
  • Andrew Hunter, former Canadian curator at the AGO, calls for a decolonization of art galleries across Canada.
  • Joanna Lavoie describes the concrete sculptures of Duane Linklater newly installed across the Don valley.
  • At Torontoist, Dennis Duffy reports on the 19th century criminal gangs once populating the Don Valley. Seriously.

[NEWS] Five links about vulnerability: parrots, Uighurs, indigenous peoples, fangsheng, Jones Act

leave a comment »

  • Hundreds of parrots in a Surrey sanctuary are still waiting for permanent homes. Global News reports.
  • NPR reports on how many Uighurs in China find success through their racially mixed appearances, as models.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer explains the rationale behind the Jones Act, with its stiff shipping charges for Puerto Rico.
  • The Chinese Buddhist fangsheng ritual, involving the release of captured animals into the wild, has issues. The Guardian reports.
  • Tyson Yunkaporta’s essay takes a look at the appeal of SF/F, and post-apocalyptic fiction, for indigenous peoples.

[URBAN NOTE] Four Toronto notes: air conditioning, Kent Monkman, ISIS at Canadian Tire, minimum wage

leave a comment »

  • In this unseasonably warm September, Toronto tenants need more air conditioning than some landlords provide. The Toronto Star reports.
  • NOW Toronto notes the launch of a new Kent Monkman canvas, this one depicting a Dutch-Iroquois treaty signing.
  • The bizarre story of an ISIS supporter who tried to attack people at a Canadian Tire store is getting more bizarre. The Toronto Star reports.
  • There is a possibility the Ontario minimum wage increase could hurt employment outside of well-off Toronto. The Globe and Mail reports.

Written by Randy McDonald

September 21, 2017 at 8:00 pm

[NEWS] Five notes about things splitting apart: Catalonia, First Nations, Brexit, NAFTA, Iceland

leave a comment »

  • If the separatists of Catalonia are triggering a confrontation with the Spanish government to create a majority … Open Democracy reports.
  • Speaking as someone who could be classified as a settler himself, positioning myself and my arguments is key. MacLean’s notes the importance of sensitivity to First Nations issues.
  • The United Kingdom does seem likely to get the selective access to the EU’s markets post-Brexit some want. Bloomberg reports.
  • Expensive avocado exports are but some of the complications that could hit North America if NAFTA gets changed. Bloomberg reports.
  • Iceland, again, is displaying particular caution towards potentially overwhelming Chinese investment projects. Bloomberg reports.

[NEWS] Five links about a changing world: Beyak, Congo, creative cities, 1990s Russia, queer

  • Tory Senator Lynn Beyak’s latest ignorant statements about First Nations have to disqualify her from public office. Global News reports.
  • Is the rebirth of Congo’s palm oil exports sign of a return to normality? Can it occur? Will it last? Bloomberg examines.
  • Oli Mould is critical of the idea promoting the arts and public culture will do much for poorer urbanites, over at Open Democracy.
  • Tom Rowley profiles a book, drawn from a VKontakte group, examining the experiences of the former USSR in the 1990s, also at Open Democracy.
  • This VICE discussion about what “queer” means is fascinating.