A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘food

[PHOTO] No rules (?) (#coronavirustoronto)

No rules #toronto #cereal #eggo #eggocereal #maplesyrup

I joked yesterday, eating a bowl of Kellogg’s Eggo cereal with Maple Syrup, that there were no rules now.

There are, of course. It is just a matter of figuring out what, exactly, these rules are.

Written by Randy McDonald

March 20, 2020 at 6:30 pm

Posted in Photo, Toronto

Tagged with , , , , ,

[NEWS] Twenty news links

  • NOW Toronto looks at the Pickering nuclear plant and its role in providing fuel for space travel.
  • In some places like California, traffic is so bad that airlines actually play a role for high-end commuters. CBC reports.
  • Goldfish released into the wild are a major issue for the environment in Québec, too. CTV News reports.
  • China’s investments in Jamaica have good sides and bad sides. CBC reports.
  • A potato museum in Peru might help solve world hunger. The Guardian reports.
  • Is the Alberta-Saskatchewan alliance going to be a lasting one? Maclean’s considers.
  • Is the fossil fuel industry collapsing? The Tyee makes the case.
  • Should Japan and Europe co-finance a EUrasia trade initiative to rival China’s? Bloomberg argues.
  • Should websites receive protection as historically significant? VICE reports.
  • Food tourism in the Maritimes is a very good idea. Global News reports.
  • Atlantic Canada lobster exports to China thrive as New England gets hit by the trade war. CBC reports.
  • The Bloc Québécois experienced its revival by drawing on the same demographics as the provincial CAQ. Maclean’s reports.
  • Population density is a factor that, in Canada, determines political issues, splitting urban and rural voters. The National Observer observes.
  • US border policies aimed against migration from Mexico have been harming businesses on the border with Canada. The National Post reports.
  • The warming of the ocean is changing the relationship of coastal communities with their seas. The Conversation looks.
  • Archival research in the digital age differs from what occurred in previous eras. The Conversation explains.
  • The Persian-language Wikipedia is an actively contested space. Open Democracy reports.
  • Vox notes how the US labour shortage has been driven partly by workers quitting the labour force, here.
  • Laurie Penny at WIRED has a stirring essay about hope, about the belief in some sort of future.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Anthropology.net notes a remarkably thorough genetic analysis of a piece of chewing gum 5700 years old that reveals volumes of data about the girl who chew it.
  • ‘Nathan Burgoine at Apostrophen writes an amazing review of Cats that actually does make me want to see it.
  • Bad Astronomy reports on galaxy NGC 6240, a galaxy produced by a collision with three supermassive black holes.
  • Caitlin Kelly at the Broadside Blog writes about the mechanics of journalism.
  • Centauri Dreams argues that the question of whether humans will walk on exoplanets is ultimately distracting to the study of these worlds.
  • Crooked Timber shares a Sunday morning photo of Bristol.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that India has a launch date of December 2021 for its first mission in its Gaganyaan crewed space program.
  • Andrew LePage at Drew Ex Machina looks at the Saturn C-1 rocket.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog considers if the vogue for minimalism meets the criteria to be considered a social movement.
  • Far Outliers ?notes how, in the War of 1812, some in New England considered the possibility of seceding from the Union.
  • Gizmodo looks at evidence of the last populations known of Homo erectus, on Java just over a hundred thousand years ago.
  • Mark Graham links to a new paper co-authored by him looking at how African workers deal with the gig economy.
  • io9 announces that the Michael Chabon novel, The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay, is set to become a television series.
  • Joe. My. God. shares a report that Putin gave Trump anti-Ukrainian conspiracy theories.
  • JSTOR Daily considers what a world with an economy no longer structured around oil could look like.
  • Language Hat takes issue with the latest talk of the Icelandic language facing extinction.
  • Language Log shares a multilingual sign photographed in Philadelphia’s Chinatown.
  • Paul Campos at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the document release revealing the futility of the war in Afghanistan.
  • The LRB Blog looks at class identity and mass movements and social democracy.
  • Tyler Cowen at Marginal Revolution suggests that, even if the economy of China is larger than the United States, Chinese per capita poverty means China does not have the leading economy.
  • Diane Duane at Out of Ambit writes about how she is writing a gay sex scene.
  • Jim Belshaw at Personal Reflections reflects on “OK Boomer”.
  • Roads and Kingdoms interviews Mexican chef Ruffo Ibarra.
  • Peter Rukavina shares his list of levees for New Year’s Day 2020 on PEI.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a map indicating fertility rates in the different regions of the European Union.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains how quantum physics are responsible for vast cosmic structures.
  • Charles Soule at Whatever explains his reasoning behind his new body-swap novel.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the negotiations between Russia and Ukraine in Paris show the lack of meaningful pro-Russian sentiment there.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell talks about his lessons from working in the recent British election.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at a syncretic, Jewish-Jedi, holiday poster.

[NEWS] Fourteen links

  • By at least one metric, New Brunswick now lags economically behind a more dynamic Prince Edward Island. CBC reports.
  • NOW Toronto looks at toxic fandoms. (“Stanning” sounds really creepy to me.)
  • This CityLab article looks at how the particular characteristics of Japan, including its high population density, helps keep alive there retail chains that have failed in the US.
  • MacLean’s looks at Kent Monkman, enjoying a new level of success with his diptych Mistikôsiwak at the Met in NYC.
  • Can there be something that can be said for the idea of an Internet more strongly pillarized? Wired argues.
  • I reject utterly the idea of meaningful similarities between Drake and Leonard Cohen. CBC did it.
  • Toronto Life looks at the life of a Hamilton woman hurt badly by the cancellation of the basic income pilot, here.
  • Inspired by the death of Gord Downie, Ontario now has the office of poet-laureate. CBC reports.
  • Is Canada at risk, like Ireland, of experiencing two-tier health care? CBC considers.
  • A French immigrant couple has brought the art of artisanal vinegar to ile d’Orléans. CBC reports.
  • Shore erosion is complicating the lives of people along Lake Erie. CBC reports.
  • MacLean’s notes how Via Rail making it difficult for people without credit cards to buy anything on their trains, hurting many.
  • Michelle Legro notes at Gen that the 2010s is the decade where conspiracy culture became mainstream.
  • This essay by Robert Greene at his blog talking about what history, and historians, can do in our era is thought-provoking.

[URBAN NOTE] Six Toronto links

  • Google has apologized for the negative shade its image search cast on Scarborough with a Twitter thread. Global News reports.
  • The National Post looks at the story of the architecturally remarkable Integral House, on sale for $C 21.5 million.
  • South Indian Dosa Mahal, a beloved Bloordale restaurant apparently displaced by landlords, has found a new home. blogTO reports.
  • The infamous Parkdale McDonald, at King and Dufferin, has officially been closed down, relocated. blogTO reports.
  • The Ontario Cannabis Store is experimenting with a same-day delivery program. NOW Toronto reports.
  • Lia Grainger writes at NOW Toronto about how poor city planning has resulted in multiple dangerous intersections. (I know of two in my broader neighbourhood.)

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait shares a stunning photo taken by a friend of the Pleiades star cluster.
  • The Buzz, at the Toronto Public Library, shares a collection of books suitable for World Vegan Month, here.
  • Henry Farrell at Crooked Timber considers, with an eye towards China and the Uighurs, how panopticon attempts can stray badly on account of–among other things–false assumptions.
  • Gizmodo considers how antimatter could end up providing interesting information about the unseen universe.
  • Joe. My. God. reports from New York City, where new HIV cases are dropping sharply on account of PrEP.
  • JSTOR Daily shares a vintage early review of Darwin’s Origin of Species.
  • Language Hat examines the origins of the semicolon, in Venice in 1494.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money shares a critical report of the new Jill Lepore book These Truths.
  • The LRB Blog reports from the Museum of Corruption in Kyiv, devoted to the corruption of the ancient regime in Ukraine.
  • Marginal Revolution shares a new history of the Lakota.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the photography of Duane Michals.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog looks at population trends in Russia, still below 1991 totals in current frontiers.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why some of the lightest elements, like lithium, are so rare.
  • Window on Eurasia shares the opinion of a Russian historian that Eastern Europe is back as a geopolitical zone.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers Jacques Transue in the light of other pop culture figures and trends.

[NEWS] Five JSTOR Daily links: ch’arki, pisco, X-rays, lavender scare, language (@jstor_daily)

  • JSTOR Daily examines ch’arki, an Andean food like jerky.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on how Peru and Chile contest claims to being the origins of pisco.
  • JSTOR Daily explores the X-ray craze of 1896, here.
  • JSTOR Daily explores the “lavender scare” of the 1950s that saw dozens of queer men purged from the American government.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how linguists are using Urban Dictionary to study the evolution of language.