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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘former soviet union

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about a week of her life as a freelance writer, highlighting so much of her work relates to social connections as opposed to actual writing.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas shares an astonishingly prescient take by E.B. White on the power of television from 1938.
  • Hornet Stories notes the efforts of the Indonesian government to get the Google Play Store there to block 70 apps used by LGBT people.
  • At In a State of Migration, Lyman Stone looks at demographic trends in Hawaii, the other major insular possession of the United States. Low fertility and a high cost of living may actually lead to population decline there, too, in the foreseeable future.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the death, at 59, of trailblazing gay comedian Bob Smith.
  • JSTOR Daily links/u> to a paper noting how Jewish resistance in the Warsaw Uprising played a critical role in shaping post-war Jewish identity.
  • Towleroad notes the announcement of an astonishingly preserved 1945 film clip showing gay men, out, at a pool party in 1945 Missouri.
  • Window on Eurasia notes one prominent Donbas separatists’ push for an aggressive response to the Ukrainian government over the collapse of Minsk, including an attempt to reclaim the remainder of Donetsk and Luhansk oblasts from Kyiv.
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[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • The Big Picture shares adorable photos of baby animals.
  • Multi-planet system K2-138 is one of the systems found via crowdsourcing, Centauri Dreams notes.
  • I did not know that David Bowie and Brian Eno visited the Gugging mental health clinic in Austria in 1994. Dangerous Minds has the photos.
  • Hornet Stories notes that Mike Pence has tried to defend himself from Adam Rippon’s criticisms by lying about his past.
  • Information is Beautiful shares an infographic depicting the edit wars last year on Wikipedia.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Northern Ireland may get a referendum on marriage equality, giving it a chance to catch up to the Republic of Ireland and to the rest of the United Kingdom.
  • JSTOR Daily links to a vintage article noting that trying to apply the Twenty-Fifth Amendment, which could unseat a sitting president if the president was disabled, could cause a constitutional crisis.
  • Language Hat notes a study suggesting that, as humans become more sedentary, linguistic evidence suggests smell becomes less important.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money wonders: how many films, how many novels, have been about _women_, not men, who are difficult geniuses? Where is the female equivalent of House?
  • The NYR Daily examines the Afro-futurism of 20th century novelist George Schuyler and his Black No More.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers what someone would see as they descended into a black hole.
  • At Towleroad, Steven Petrow tells how HIV/AIDS doctor Mathilde Krim saved his life.
  • Window on Eurasia notes one, militant, response in the Donbas republics to the breakdown of the Minsk Accords with Ukraine.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • ‘Nathan Smith at Apostrophen points out the profound wrongness of a same-sex romance novel that has (for starters) protagonists involved in LGBT conversion camps described sympathetically.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the exciting new detailed surface map of Titan. Among other things, that world has a sea level common to all its liquid bodies, and they have sharp shores.
  • The Crux notes a new effort to understand Antarctica underneath the ice. What happened the last time its ice melted?
  • Bruce Dorminey notes that Venus is actually really important for astronomers who are interested in extraterrestrial life.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog explains why it is important to learn about social theory if you’re a sociologist. Discourse matters.
  • Far Outliers notes the many translations of Hawaii’s “TheBus” into the Asian languages spoken there.
  • Hornet Stories notes research suggesting that product ads targeting LGBTQ markets can have good knock-on effects for these products’ general market share.
  • At In Media Res, Russell Arben Fox has started a series looking back at some of the best songs of 1978.
  • JSTOR Daily notes two education papers suggesting ways art education can improve empathy among students.
  • Language Hat notes a genetic study of populations in the Chachapoyas region of coastal Peru suggesting people there were not displaced by Incan expansion.
  • Language Log reports on a study that examines connections between a person’s lexical diversity and the progress of degenerative brain health issues.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reports on the possibility that Russian money may have been funneled through the NRA.
  • The NYR Daily reports on the intensely personal performance art of Patty Chang.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on the latest discoveries and events surrounding the Dawn probe in its permanent Ceres orbit.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes evidence that extrasolar visitor ‘Oumuamua has been deeply shaped by its encounters with cosmic particles.
  • Transit Toronto shares detailed depictions of some of the new public art installations to be housed in six stations on the Eglinton Crosstown LRT.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the growing presence of Central Asian migrants in the smaller communities of Russia. (Chinese, unsurprisingly, have not made it there.)

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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‘Nathan Smith at Apostrophen points out that claiming to disagree with homosexuality while respecting gay people is nonsensical. https://apostrophen.wordpress.com/2018/01/11/queer-isnt-an-opinion/

Centauri Dreams notes the innovative cheap PicSat satellite, currently monitoring Beta Pictoris with its known exoplanet. https://www.centauri-dreams.org/?p=39109

Corey Robin at Crooked Timber argues that Trump is shaky, weaker than American democracy. (Not that that is going that well, mind.) http://crookedtimber.org/2018/01/13/trumps-power-is-shakier-than-american-democracy/

The Crux points out the sentient, including emotions, of any number of animal species. http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/crux/2018/01/11/animals-feelings-sentient/

Far Outliers notes some German commanders in western Europe who quickly surrendered to the Allies in the Second World War, and why they did that. http://faroutliers.blogspot.com/2018/01/quick-german-surrenders-in-west.html

Hornet Stories notes how a court decision dealing with a Romanian man and his American husband could lead to European Union-wide recognition of same-sex marriage. https://hornetapp.com/stories/european-union-gay-marriage/

JSTOR Daily notes how air pollution is a human rights issue. https://daily.jstor.org/why-air-pollution-is-a-socioeconomic-issue/

Language Hat notes how the use of the apostrophe in the newly Latin script-using Kazakh language is controversial. http://languagehat.com/apostrophe-catastrophe-in-kazakhstan/

Geoffrey Pullim at Lingua Franca shares a passage from Muriel Spark’s fiction depicting students’ reactions to learning foreign languages. https://www.chronicle.com/blogs/linguafranca/2018/01/11/a-foreign-way-which-never-really-caught-on

The LRB Blog tells the story of Omid, an Iranian who managed to smuggle himself from his home country to a precarious life in the United Kingdom. https://www.lrb.co.uk/blog/2018/01/15/behzad-yaghmaian/omids-journey/

The Map Room Blog shares a newly-updated map of “Trumpworld” the world as seen by Donald Trump. http://www.maproomblog.com/2018/01/trumpworld/

Marginal Revolution notes research indicating that dolphins have a grasp on economics, and what this indicates about their sentience. http://marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2018/01/dolphin-capital-theory.html

The Planetary Society Blog notes how the upcoming Europa Clipper probe will be able to analyze Europa’s oceans without encountering plumes of water. http://www.planetary.org/blogs/jason-davis/2018/20180111-no-plumes-no-problem.html

The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer suggests that, with the declining import of informal rules in American politics, a future Democratic-majority Congress might be able to sneak through statehood for Puerto Rico and Washington D.C. http://noelmaurer.typepad.com/aab/2018/01/breaking-norms-by-adding-states.html

Rocky Planet reports on the disastrous mudflows that have hit southern California after the fires. http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/rockyplanet/2018/01/12/mudflows-devastate-parts-of-southern-california/

Drew Rowsome praises new horror from Matt Ruff. http://drewrowsome.blogspot.com/2018/01/lovecraft-country-matt-ruffs-multi.html

Peter Rukavina talks about his positive experiences with a walk-in mental health clinic on the Island. https://ruk.ca/content/i-went-mental-health-walk-clinic-and-so-can-you

Strange Company talks about the bizarre 1982 disappearance of one Donald Kemp. Did he even die? http://strangeco.blogspot.com/2018/01/the-strange-exit-of-donald-kemp.html

Towleroad notes that Peter Thiel is trying to buy Gawker, perhaps to destroy its archives. http://www.towleroad.com/2018/01/gawker-peter-thiel/

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares a stunning photo of two galaxies colliding in the eternal night and considers the implications of the Milky Way’s future encounter with Andromeda.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the latest discoveries regarding FRB 121102 and fast radio bursts generally.
  • Hornet Stories suggests that a recent ruling by the Inter American Court of Human Rights sets the stage for marriage equality across Latin America.
  • Inkfish notes that the biomass of dead squid mothers plays a major role in the environments and ecologies of seafloors.
  • JSTOR Daily suggests retirees can actually learn a lot from the lifestyles of members of the RV–recreational vehicle–community.
  • Language Hat reports on wordplay, and its translations, in the works of Homer.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the turn to anti-intellectualism among American conservatives.
  • At Lingua Franca, William Germano talks about telling numbers.
  • The LRB Blog notes the story of the English village of Imber, intentionally depopulated by the British military during the Second World War and never allowed to be restored.
  • The NYR Daily talks about a London exhibition on the art of our era of terrorism and terror.
  • The Planetary Society Blog reports on the latest Juno discoveries from Jupiter.
  • Progressive Download’s John Farrell reports on a debate as to whether the origin of life is a more difficult question than the origin of consciousness.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on the simple pleasures of an iced coffee enjoyed in the Australian Outback.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel U>considers an interesting question: is ours the only advanced civilization in the universe?
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little tackles the concept of organizational cultures.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that post-1991 immigrants from the former Soviet Union form a tenth of the Russian labour force.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • At Antipope, Charlie Stross takes a look at the dystopian future we’ve created for ourselves with the help of Big Data.
  • Kambiz Kamrani at Anthropology net notes the discovery of an Ancient Beringian population involved in the peopling of the Americas.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait considers the awesome possibility of life on pulsar planets, i.e. on planets that survived or were made by a supernova.
  • Centauri Dreams suggests that dust, not ET artifacts, may explain the odd light coming from KIC 8462852, aka Boyajian’s Star.
  • Crooked Timber considers the surprisingly mixed emotions of unions regarding the idea of a guaranteed minimum income.
  • Far Outliers takes a look at the diverse non-German soldiers serving in occupied France in the Second World War.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas considers parallels between the mentality of Silicon Valley and totalitarianism.
  • Hornet Stories considers the questionable idea of a “gold star” or “platinum star” gay person. What, exactly, is being celebrated?
  • JSTOR Daily notes the gendered nature of the supermarket of mid-20th century North America.
  • Language Hat celebrates the establishment of Hakka as an official language in Taiwan, as does Language Log.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money argues that the previous Oregon laws against self-service gas stations helped boost employment for the vulnerable.
  • Lingua Franca considers the concept of “ghosting”, linguistically at otherwise.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper examining how creativity has clustered in cities in the past.
  • Out There shares the arguments of Charles Miller for infrastructure to support crewed expansion and settlement in space, starting with the Moon.
  • Peter Rukavina talks about his last visit, with his son, to the Sears store in Charlottetown.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that 2018 may be the year we finally take a picture of a black hole, Sagittarius A* in the heart of our galaxy.
  • To what extent is history probabilistic? Understanding Society considers.
  • Window on Eurasia notes controversy in Siberia over Chinese investors who come in and disregard local sensitivities and regulations.

[NEWS] Five links: meat tax, Civilization VI, Mount Washington, Niagara Falls, Soviet fall

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  • Is a sin tax to discourage meat consumption a good idea, at least environmentally? CBC considers.
  • The use of Chief Poundmaker and the Cree as players in the new game Civilization VI is controversial among the Cree, who wonder why they were not asked first. The National Post reports.
  • Mount Washington, in New Hampshire, sounds like a particularly frigid place. The New York Times describes the environment.
  • Despite appearing frozen, water still flows underneath the ice of the Niagara Falls. CBC explains./li>
  • How could the fall of the Soviet Union, and the inclusion of successor states in the international order, have gone differently? What was possible? Transitions Online considers.