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Posts Tagged ‘former soviet union

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • James Bow notes, by way of explaining new fiction he is writing, why a Mercury colony makes sense.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the life of Anita Brenner, a Mexican-born American Jewish writer who helped connect the two North American neighbours.
  • Far Outliers’ Joel notes the cautious approach of the United States towards famine relief in the young Soviet Union in 1922.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas shares a brief Lewis Mumford quote, talking about how men became mechanical in spirit before they invented complex machines.
  • Hornet Stories celebrates the many ways in which the movie Addams Family Values is queer.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the idea of what “thoughtfulness” means in relation to Senator Al Franken.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a few more fantasy map generators.
  • The NYR Daily considers the thoughtful stamp art of Vincent Sardon.
  • Progressive Download’s John Farrell recommends Adam Rutherford’s new book, A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived, on genomics and history.
  • Towleroad notes that Demi Levato took trans Virginian politician Danica Roem her to the American Music Awards.
  • Window on Eurasia shares a Tatar cleric’s speculation that Russia’s undermining of the Tatar language in education might push Tatars away from Russia.
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[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Dangerous Minds shares some of the exotic space music of composer Pauline Anna Strom.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining the effect of in-system super-Earth on asteroid impacts upon terrestrial planets.
  • Hornet Stories, for ones, notes that Cards Against Humanity has bought up a stretch along the US-Mexican border to prevent the construction of a border wall.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reminds people–sad that it has to be done–that, even in Trump outposts like Johnstown in Pennsylvania where racism has replaced reason among too many, there still are good things in this and other like communities.
  • The LRB Blog considers the plight of British-Iranian Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, whose plight in Iranian custody has been worsened by her government. What can be done for her?
  • Marginal Revolution notes how, in the early 20th century as in the early 21st century, substantial immigration to the US became politically controversial despite its benefits.
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at the art of Tove Jansson, beyond the Moomins.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer takes a look at the slow emergence of Canadian citizenship distinct from the British over the 20th century.
  • Roads and Kingdoms takes</u. a look at the grape-crashing of the vineyards of Oliver, British Columbia.
  • Peter Rukavina describes the origin of the theme music of CBC classic show The Friendly Giant in the 18th century English folk tune “Early One Morning.”
  • Seriously Science notes that oysters can apparently hear sound.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that the autonomy enjoyed by Puerto Rico was one source of inspiration for the nationalists of Tatarstan in the early 1990s.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the remarkably enduring supernova iPTF14hls, which seems to have attained its longevity through massive amounts of antimatter.
  • blogTO notes plans for the construction of a new public square in Chinatown, on Huron Street.
  • James Bow shares a short story of his, set in a future where everyone has a guaranteed minimum income but few have a job.
  • A poster at Crasstalk shares a nostalgic story about long-lost summers as a child in Albuquerque in the 1960s.
  • Bruce Dorminey reports on Universe, a beautiful book concerned with the history of astronomical imagery.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog explores the latent and manifest functions of education for job-seekers.
  • Far Outliers’ Joel talks about the Red Terror imposed by Lenin in 1918, and its foreshadowing of the future of the Soviet Union.
  • Language Hat links to a lovely analysis of a Tang Chinese poem, “On the Frontier.”
  • Language Log notes how the name of Chinese food “congee” ultimately has origins in Dravidian languages.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money takes note of the suspicious timing of links between the Trump family and Wikileaks.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen recounts his visit to an Amazon bookstore, and what he found lacking (or found good).
  • The NYR Daily notes the continuing controversy over the bells of the church of Balangiga, in the Philippines, taken as booty in 1901 by American forces and not returned.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders why Canadian incomes and productivity have historically been 20-30% lower than those of the United States, and why incomes have lately caught up.
  • Roads and Kingdoms considers the simple pleasures of an egg and cracker snack in the Faroe Islands.
  • Strange Company considers the bizarre 1910 murder of Massachusetts lawyer William Lowe Rice.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes an Australian publisher that suspended publication of a book in Australia for fear of negative reaction from China.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares some photos of his orchids, blooming early because of warm temperatures.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly takes a look at the concept of resilience.
  • D-Brief notes the many ways in which human beings can be killed by heat waves.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes a claim for the discovery of a new pulsar planet, PSR B0329+54 b, two Earth masses with an orbit three decades long.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas argues that, in some was, online connectivity is like a drug.
  • Hornet Stories considers the plight of bisexuals in the closet.
  • Language Hat considers the origins of the family name of Hungarian Karl-Maria Kertbeny, the man who developed the term “homosexuality”, and much else besides.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how the item of soap was a key component behind racism and apartheid in South Africa.
  • Progressive Download’s John Farrell notes a new book, The Quotable Darwin.
  • Peter Rukavina takes a look at 18 years’ worth of links on his blog. How many are still good? The answer may surprise you.
  • Understanding Society considers the insights of Tony Judt on the psychology of Europeans after the Second World War.
  • John Scalzi at Whatever considers, in Q&A format, some insights for men in the post-Weinstein era.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at how boundaries in the Caucasus were not necessarily defined entirely by the Bolsheviks.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers various odd appearances of pickles in contemporary popular culture.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the effort to name, for New Horizons, Kuiper belt world (486958) 2014 MU69.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the possibility that Ceres might have a residual ocean underneath its surface.
  • D-Brief notes the bizarre supernova iPTF14hls, which seems to have been a recurrent supernova for the past sixty years.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas argues we are already in a dystopia, one of Huxley not of Orwell.
  • Hornet Stories notes that Ezra Miller was advised not to come out by his supposed allies in Hollywood.
  • The LRB Blog notes an interesting exhibit, inspired by poetry and the Stalinist camp system, in London’s Bloomsbury Square.
  • At Out of Ambit, Diane Duane tells the old Swiss story of Charlemagne and the snake.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on the last days of bullfighting in Tijuana.
  • Mark Simpson considers the state of masculinity in the modern United Kingdom, and calls for some tartiness.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel considers how the Bullet Cluster of galaxies helps prove the existence of dark matter.
  • Understanding Society considers political power in China at the level of the village.
  • Window on Eurasia considers a variety of negative demographic trends for ethnic Russians in Russia, including low fertility and emigration.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Centauri Dreams notes the remarkably complex system of Proxima Centauri, with multiple belts and more possible planets, as does D-Brief.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of a new sort of fusion reactions, involving not atoms but quarks.
  • Hornet Stories notes a new acoustic cover of the Kinky Boots song “Not My Father’s Son.”
  • Language Hat takes a brief look at Cyrillic, since the Soviet era written in Cyrillic script.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how the Trump Administration is unconcerned by the latest report regarding catastrophic climate change.
  • The LRB Blog notes how Armenia and Armenians remember past genocides and current refugee flows.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes the further extension of the Dawn mission at Ceres.
  • Drew Rowsome shares some of Stephen King’s tips for aspiring writers.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how some long-exposure Hubble photographs of galaxies picked up nearby asteroids.
  • John Scalzi shares his cover of “Rocket Man”.
  • Window on Eurasia wonders if ISIS is spreading into Russia via migrant workers from Central Asia.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Anthrodendum shares an essay by Yana Stainova talking about restoring a sense of enchantment to ethnography.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at NGTS-1b, a hot Jupiter unusually orbiting a red dwarf star, as does Centauri Dreams.
  • D-Brief looks at how the relativistic jets of matter issuing from central black holes in active galaxies work.
  • Hornet Stories notes an upcoming revival of Boys in the Band by Ryan Murphy, with Zachary Quinto and Matt Bomer.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that 28% of those polled worldwide would favour recriminalizing homosexuality.
  • Language Hat looks at the role played by Italian dialect in games of bocce.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a study examining some of the structural economic failings of socialism in Yugoslavia.
  • Neuroskeptic wonders if there should be a place where people can make use of perfectly good abandoned data sets.
  • Understanding Society looks at the yawning gap between social science theories and actual policies.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how above-average immigrant fertility helps keep birth rates up in Moscow.