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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘former soviet union

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Centauri Dreams considers the idea of dispatching a fleet of sail-equipped probes to map the asteroid belt.
  • Crux considers the importance of the invention of zero for mathematics.
  • D-Brief notes that Scotland’s oldest snow patch is set to melt imminently.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper looking at the stability of multiplanetary systems in star clusters.
  • Imageo notes the modest recovery of icecaps in the Arctic this summer.
  • Language Log notes the importance of Kazakhstan’s shift to using the Latin script for the Kazakh language.
  • The LRB Blog reports on a writer’s visit to Helsinki.
  • The Map Room Blog notes a giant relief map of Guatemala, built to reinforce claims to what is now Belize.
  • The NYR Daily considers the continued salience of race in the fragile liberal-democratic world, in America and Europe.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders if the heavy-handed Spanish government is trying to trigger Catalonian independence.
  • Roads and Kingdoms considers the palm wine of Senegal, and its vendors.
  • Understanding Society considers the Holocaust, as an experience sociological and otherwise.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy makes a libertarian case for open borders.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi celebrates his meeting mutual fan Alison Moyet.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Belarus’ cautious Belarusianization is met by Russia’s pro-Soviet nostalgia.
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[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • Far Outliers notes how the new Suez Canal helped create a network of coal-using port cities across Eurasia.
  • Hornet Stories notes that Serbia’s out lesbian Prime Minister, Ana Brnabic, marched in Belgrade’s pride parade.
  • Joe. My. God. notes a statement by the Pentagon that transgender troops can still re-enlist for the next few months.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes a fundamentally ill-thought defense of colonialism by Bruce Gilley.
  • Marginal Revolutions notes that Swedish support for the far right is linked to perceptions of foreign threats to employment.
  • Out There looks at the last days of Cassini at Saturn.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw notes real estate shenanigans in greater Sydney.
  • Drew Rowsome has a critical, but positive, review of closeted gay author Frank M. Robinson’s autobiography.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy sums up the outcome of the controversial monkey selfie copyright case.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that Russian challenges to language legislation in Tatarstan hint at future challenges.

[NEWS] Five links about a changing world: Beyak, Congo, creative cities, 1990s Russia, queer

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  • Tory Senator Lynn Beyak’s latest ignorant statements about First Nations have to disqualify her from public office. Global News reports.
  • Is the rebirth of Congo’s palm oil exports sign of a return to normality? Can it occur? Will it last? Bloomberg examines.
  • Oli Mould is critical of the idea promoting the arts and public culture will do much for poorer urbanites, over at Open Democracy.
  • Tom Rowley profiles a book, drawn from a VKontakte group, examining the experiences of the former USSR in the 1990s, also at Open Democracy.
  • This VICE discussion about what “queer” means is fascinating.

[URBAN NOTE] Four Toronto notes: Gibraltar Point, Centreville carousel, condo designss, Estonians

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  • NOW Toronto notes how Gibraltar Point marks the Toronto Islands’ point most vulnerable to erosion.
  • It seems, as Fatima Syed notes, that the Centreville carousel will not be bought by its intended buyer.
  • VICE reports on a young Toronto architect who suggests condos could be more affordable if they were more modular.
  • A highly disproportionate number of Toronto’s innovative post-war architects were Estonian refugees. Stunning works. The Globe and Mail reports.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Anthrodendum considers the difficulties of the anthropologist in the context of a world where their knowledges are monetized.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about two days she spent in Montréal, with photos.
  • Crooked Timber starts a discussion about the justice, or lack thereof, in Harvard denying convicted murderer Michelle Jones entry into their doctoral program now that her sentence is over.
  • D-Brief looks at the changing nature of the global disease burden, and its economic consequences.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that Equifax’s terribly lax data protection should mark the endgame for them.
  • The Map Room Blog considers the use of earth-observer satellites to predict future disease outbreaks (malaria, here, in Peru).
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how quantum mechanics helps explain nuclear fusion in our sun.
  • Window on Eurasia notes a report that Muscovites live on average 12 years longer than non-Muscovite Russians.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Centauri Dreams considers the idea of uploading a digital “Golden Record” into the memory of New Horizons.
  • Crooked Timber takes a look at American legal writer (and judge) Richard Posner’s embrace of pragmatism. What does it mean?
  • D-Brief notes the rapid melting of the glaciers that feed the major rivers of Asia.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper considering ways to detect planets in orbit of red giants.
  • The LRB Blog considers the potential for political tumult in Saudi Arabia, in the wake of arrests and rumours.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a new gravity map of Mars, revealing the crust of that world to be less dense and more variable than thought.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the South China Sea dispute in the wake of Indonesia’s newly restated claims.
  • Roads and Kingdoms looks at Philadelphia’s seasonal cookie–spiced wafer–wars.
  • Drew Rowsome is a big fan of the movie adaptation of It.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that, for want of better options, the Donbas republics’ people might return to Ukraine.

[NEWS] Three links from eastern Europe: Bulgaria and Macedonia, Moldova, Georgia and Abkhazia

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  • Bulgaria and Macedonia have at last signed a treaty trying to put their contentious past behind them. Greece next?
  • The legacies of Stalinist deportations in Moldova continue to trouble this poor country.
  • The plight of the ethnic Georgians apparently permanently displaced from Georgia has been only muted by time.