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Posts Tagged ‘former yugoslavia

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes that the measured rate of the expansion of the universe depends on the method used to track this rate, and that this is a problem.
  • On Sunday, Caitlin Kelly celebrated receiving her annual cheque from Canada’s Public Lending Program, which gives authors royalties based on how often their book has been borrowed in our public libraries.
  • In The Buzz, the Toronto Public Library identified five books in its collection particularly prone to be challenged by would-be censors.
  • D-Brief suggests that, if bacteria managed to survive and adapt in the Atacama desert as it became hostile to life, like life might have done the same on Mars.
  • Far Outliers notes the crushing defeat, and extensive looting of, the MOghul empire by the Persia of Nader Shah.
  • Hornet Stories looks at the medal hauls of out Olympic athletes this year in Pyeongchang.
  • Imageo notes satellite imagery indicating that fisheries occupy four times the footprint of agriculture. Aquaculture is starting to look like a necessary idea, I think.

  • At In Media Res, Russell Arben Fox praises Porch Fires, a new biography of Laura Ingalls Wilder by Caroline Fraser, for its insights on Wilder and on the moment of the settlement of the American West.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how, in the 19th century after the development of anesthesia, the ability to relieve people of pain was a political controversy. Shouldn’t it be felt, wasn’t it natural?
  • Language Hat links to an article taking a look behind the scenes at the Oxford English Dictionary. How does it work? What are its challenges?
  • At Lingua Franca, Roger Shuy distinguishes between different kinds of speech events and explains why they are so important in the context of bribery trials.
  • The LRB Blog shares some advice on ethics in statecraft from the 2nd century CE Chinese writer Liu An.
  • J. Hoberman at the NYR Daily reviews an exhibit of the work of Bauhaus artist Jozef Albers at the Guggenheim.
  • Roads and Kingdoms shares an anecdote of travellers drinking homemade wine in Montenegro.
  • Drew Rowsome interviews Native American drag queen and up-and-coming music star Vizin.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains how star S0-2, orbiting so close to the black hole at the heart of the Milky Way Galaxy, will help prove Einsteinian relativity.
  • Vintage Space explains, for the record, how rockets can work in a vacuum. (This did baffle some people this time last century.)
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that, on its 100th anniversary, Estonia has succeeded in integrating most of its Russophones.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Larisa Kurtović writes at anthro{dendum} about her experiences, as an anthropologist studying Bosnia and a native Sarajevan, at the time of the trial of Ratko Mladić. Representation in this circumstance was fraught.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the remarkable claim that extragalactic planets have been discovered 3.5 billion light-years away through gravitational lensing and does not find it intrinsically implausible. Centauri Dreams also looks at the background behind the claimed detection of two thousand rogue planets, ranging in mass from the Moon to Jupiter, in a distant galaxy.
  • Dangerous Minds reviews a fantastic-sounding book reviewing girl gangs and bikers in the pulp fiction of mid-20th century English-language literature.
  • Hornet Stories links to the Mattachine Podcast, a new podcast looking at pre-Stonwall LGBTQ history including that relating to the pioneering Mattachine Society.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the substantial evidence that fish can actually be quite smart, certainly smarter than popular stereotypes have them being.
  • Language Hat reports on the existence of a thriving population of speakers of Aramaic now in existence in New Jersey.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the many ways in which the privatization of state businesses have gone astray in the United Kingdom, and suggests that there is conflict between short-term capitalist desires and long-term needs. Renationalization a solution?
  • At Marginal Revolution, Tyler Cowen argues that the prospect of the future financial insolvency of Chicago helps limit the large-scale settlement of wealthy people there, keeping the metropolis relatively affordable.
  • Stephen Baker of The Numerati reflected, on the eve of the Superbowl, on the origins of his fandom with the Philadelphia Eagles in 1963 just before the assassination of JFK.
  • The NYR Daily shares a rational proposal for an Israeli-Palestinian confederation that, alas, will never fly given irrational reality.
  • Seriously Science notes a paper suggesting that Norway rats do, in fact, the reciprocal trade of goods and services.
  • Strange Company notes an unfortunate picnic in Indiana in 1931, where the Simmons family was unexpectedly poisoned by strychnine capsules? Who did it?
  • Window on Eurasia notes a demographers’ observation that, given the age structure and fertility of the Russian population, even with plausible numbers of immigrants the country’s population may never again grow.

[NEWS] Four geopolitics links: democracy, Trump and China, India and Pakistan, western Balkans

  • The suggestion by David Moscrop, at MacLean’s, that between the rise of authoritarian China and the Trump ascendancy in the US, liberal democracy may face particular peril this year seems worryingly plausible.
  • Evan Osnos at The New Yorker looks at how the savvy Chinese government is taking advantage of Trump’s incapacities.
  • This DefenseOne essay arguing that India is facing a point where it is unable to defeat Pakistan in conventional battle is worth noting.
  • This B92 essay arguing that the European Union should make special provisions for the western Balkans to avoid their protracted decay outside of the Union convinces me, at least.

[NEWS] Three links on frontiers: Liberland, Catalonia, West Bank maps

  • GQ has a terribly unflattering article about the motivations and personalities behind the establishment of Liberland, a libertarian microstate on an island at the frontiers of Serbia and Croatia.
  • This extended examination of the issue of Catalonian separatism in Spain, taking a look at both sides of the conflicts, suggests this conflict may be intractable. The Atlantic has it.
  • Miriam Berger at Wired notes how the profound insufficiency of maps of the Palestinian-occupied areas of the West Bank forces Palestinians to turn to newcomer maps.me.

[NEWS] Four notes from distant corners: Corsica, Dominica, Scotland and Northern Ireland, Montenegro

  • Nationalists, though not separatists, have done quite well in recent elections in Corsica. Bloomberg reports.
  • Dominica, ravaged by recent hurricanes, is preparing for an environmentally tumultuous future. The Inter Press Service reports.
  • Scotland, for one, is looking to Northern Ireland as a possible precedent for its relationship with the European Union. Bloomberg reports.
  • Balkanist takes a look at the potential impact the breakdown of relations between Russia and Montenegro might have on the small state, dependent on Russian tourism.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Anthrodendum shares an essay by Yana Stainova talking about restoring a sense of enchantment to ethnography.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at NGTS-1b, a hot Jupiter unusually orbiting a red dwarf star, as does Centauri Dreams.
  • D-Brief looks at how the relativistic jets of matter issuing from central black holes in active galaxies work.
  • Hornet Stories notes an upcoming revival of Boys in the Band by Ryan Murphy, with Zachary Quinto and Matt Bomer.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that 28% of those polled worldwide would favour recriminalizing homosexuality.
  • Language Hat looks at the role played by Italian dialect in games of bocce.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a study examining some of the structural economic failings of socialism in Yugoslavia.
  • Neuroskeptic wonders if there should be a place where people can make use of perfectly good abandoned data sets.
  • Understanding Society looks at the yawning gap between social science theories and actual policies.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how above-average immigrant fertility helps keep birth rates up in Moscow.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Far Outliers notes how the new Suez Canal helped create a network of coal-using port cities across Eurasia.
  • Hornet Stories notes that Serbia’s out lesbian Prime Minister, Ana Brnabic, marched in Belgrade’s pride parade.
  • Joe. My. God. notes a statement by the Pentagon that transgender troops can still re-enlist for the next few months.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes a fundamentally ill-thought defense of colonialism by Bruce Gilley.
  • Marginal Revolutions notes that Swedish support for the far right is linked to perceptions of foreign threats to employment.
  • Out There looks at the last days of Cassini at Saturn.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw notes real estate shenanigans in greater Sydney.
  • Drew Rowsome has a critical, but positive, review of closeted gay author Frank M. Robinson’s autobiography.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy sums up the outcome of the controversial monkey selfie copyright case.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that Russian challenges to language legislation in Tatarstan hint at future challenges.