A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘france

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the discovery of rings around Kuiper belt dwarf planet Haumea, as does the Planetary Society Blog’s Jason Davis.
  • The Big Picture, from the Boston Globe, shares photos of the devastation of Puerto Rico by Maria.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the strong support of many–most?–on the American right for apartheid.
  • The LRB Blog shares an article by Mike Davis looking at the vulnerability of California, especially Napa, to wildfires.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a beautiful detailed map of the French railway network.
  • The NYR Daily reports from Catalonia on the edge of a meltdown.
  • North’s Justin Petrone writes about going hunting for mushroooms in Estonia.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel shares five especially noteworthy photos provided by NASA. (What, no Pale Blue Dot?)
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Russians in Tatarstan, unlike other groups, are unique in not wanting to learn Tatar.
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[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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Bad Astronomer Phil Plait talks about the discovery that the early Moon had a notable atmosphere. http://www.syfy.com/syfywire/air-de-lune

The Big Picture, from the Boston Globe, shares terrifying pictures from the California wildfires. https://www.bostonglobe.com/news/bigpicture/2017/10/10/raging-wildfires-california/GtkTUeIILcZeqp5jlsLTMI/story.html

The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about how writers need editing, and editors. https://broadsideblog.wordpress.com/2017/10/14/why-editors-matter-more-than-ever/

D-Brief notes that forming coal beds sucked so much carbon dioxide out of the air that it triggered an ice age.
http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/d-brief/2017/10/10/coal-earth-ice/

Dangerous Minds looks at Michael’s Thing, a vintage guide to gay New York dating from the 1970s. http://dangerousminds.net/comments/michaels_thing_new_york_citys_once_essential_queer_city_guide

Cody Delistraty looks at a new Paris exhibition of the works of Paul Gauguin that tries to deal with his moral sketchiness, inspiration of much his work. https://delistraty.com/2017/10/09/paul-gauguins-insurmountable-immorality/

Hornet Stories notes that same same-sex-attracted guys opt to be called not gay but androphiles. (Less baggage, they say.) https://hornetapp.com/stories/men-who-love-men-androphile/

Language Hat notes a claim that the Spanish of Christopher Columbus was marked by Catalan. http://languagehat.com/columbuss-catalan/

Language Log notes that the languages of southern China like Cantonese are actually fully-fledged languages. http://languagelog.ldc.upenn.edu/nll/?p=34933

Lawyers, Guns and Money notes an argument that Chinese companies do not abide by the terms of tech transfer agreements.
http://www.lawyersgunsmoneyblog.com/2017/10/tech-transfer

The LRB Blog notes an old Mike Davis article noting how California, at a time of climate change, risks catastrophic wildfires. https://www.lrb.co.uk/blog/2017/10/10/the-editors/california-burning/

The Map Room Blog is unimpressed by the new book, A History of Canada in Ten Maps. (It needs more maps. Seriously.) https://buff.ly/2gcdLKG

The NYR Daily takes another look at the nature of consciousness.
http://www.nybooks.com/daily/2017/10/09/consciousness-an-object-lesson/

The Planetary Society Blog shares a scientist’s story about how he stitched together the last mosaic photo of Saturn by Cassini. http://www.planetary.org/blogs/guest-blogs/2017/cassinis-last-dance-with-saturn-farewell-mosaic.html

The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that an unnegotiated secession of Catalonia from Spain would be a catastrophe for the new country. http://noelmaurer.typepad.com/aab/2017/10/la-econom%C3%ADa-de-la-secesi%C3%B3n-en-la-madre-patria.html

Roads and Kingdoms considers what is next for Kurdistan after its independence referendum. http://roadsandkingdoms.com/2017/whats-next-for-kurdistan/

Science Sushi considers the sketchy science of studying cetacean sex. http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/science-sushi/2017/10/10/dolphin-penis-vagina-simulated-marine-mammal-sex/

Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that exceptionally strong evidence that we do, in fact, exist in a real multiverse. https://www.forbes.com/sites/startswithabang/2017/10/12/the-multiverse-is-inevitable-and-were-living-in-it/

Strange Maps looks at rates of reported corruption across Latin America, finding that Mexico fares badly. http://bigthink.com/strange-maps/half-of-all-mexicans-paid-a-bribe-in-the-previous-12-months

Window on Eurasia notes new inflows of migrants to Russia include fewer Europeans and many more Central Asians. http://windowoneurasia2.blogspot.ca/2017/10/gastarbeiters-in-russia-from-central.html

[ISL] Four islands links: Beothuk, Newfoundland outports, seasteading, Shetlands

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  • DNA tests of Beothuk remains reveal that the extinct group was related to neither Mi’kmaq nor Inuit. The Globe and Mail reports.
  • Some Newfoundland outports are seeing many young professionals move in, to make homes and businesses. CBC reports.
  • Marginal Revolution claims a group wanting to mount a seasteading effort off French Polynesia are getting close to their goals.
  • Politico.eu notes that, in the Shetlands, while fishers hope Brexit will lead to the revival of the fisheries others fear a labour shortage without EU-27 migrants.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • At Antipope, Charlie Stross considers the ways in which Big Data could enable an updated version of 1984.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at all the ways in which this photo of galaxy NGC 5559 is cool, with a supernova and more.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly shares a week of her life as a professional writer.
  • Crooked Timber looks at the potentially dominant role of racism as a political marker in the US.
  • Far Outliers notes that the Confederacy’s military options circa 1864 were grim and limited.
  • Language Log shares an example of a Starbucks coffee cup with biscriptal writing from Shenyang.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that the Rohingya are being subjected to genocide. What next?
  • Marginal Revolution notes the introduction of a new chocolate, ruby chocolate“.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw has it with ideological divisions of left and right.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks at the remarkably intemperate Spanish court decision that kicked off modern separatism in Catalonia.
  • Charley Ross looks at the sad story of missing teenager Brittanee Drexel.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that now is an excellent time to start highlighting the politics of climate change.
  • Towleroad mourns New York City theatre star Michael Friedman.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the ways in which Russia is, and is not, likely to use the military.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares a map of the regional languages of France.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper examining a potential relationship between stars’ magnetic fields and exoplanets.
  • Hornet Stories links to the Instagram account of Tom Bianchi, still taking photos of Fire Island.
  • Language Hat notes the death of Ognen Cemerski, a Macedonian who went to heroic lengths to translate Moby Dick into his language.
  • Language Log notes an unusual hybrid Sino-Tibetan sign for a restaurant.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money is appropriately savage with Hillbilly Elegy (at least of uncritical readings of said).
  • Marginal Revolutions links to a paper noting French cities, unlike British ones, are much more tightly tied to old Roman settlements, away from the sea.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw calls for the return of the Australian $2 bill.
  • Roads and Kingdoms looks at the aftermath of rampant electoral fraud in Angola. What will come next?
  • Drew Rowsome takes a stand against, particularly in the context of Stephen King’s It, the now-common fear of clowns.
  • Understanding Society takes a look at Erik Olin Wright’s thinking on possible utopias.
  • Window on Eurasia notes potential contributions of Russophone Belarusians and Ukrainians to the Russophone world, and notes some controversy in Moscow re: widely-observed Muslim holidays at start of the school year.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly re-introduces herself to her readers.
  • Bruce Dorminey shares one man’s theory about how extraterrestrials could use exoplanet sightings to build up a galactic communications network.
  • Far Outliers shares some unusual Japanese words, starting with “amepotu” for American potato.
  • Language Hat takes</a. note of an effort to preserve the Kiowa language.
  • Did the spokeswoman of the NRA threaten to “fisk” the New York Times or threaten something else? Language Log reports.
  • Drew Rowsome notes that, compared to San Francisco, Toronto does not have much of a public kink scene.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel examines the quantum reasons behind the explosion produced by sodium metal and water.
  • Understanding Society takes rightful issue with The Guardian’s shoddy coverage of Dearborn, Michigan, and that city’s Muslims and/or Arabs.
  • Unicorn Booty notes that Canada is, at last, starting to take in queer refugees from Chechnya.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes the embarrassing support for Jean-Luc Mélenchon for Venezuela. Was opposing the US all he wanted?

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Anthrodendum takes a look at how surfing has been commodified.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the stellar occultation that has revealed information about MU69, the next New Horizons target.
  • Crooked Timber’s Corey Robin takes issue with Mélenchon’s take on anti-Semitism and the French role in the Holocaust.
  • D-Brief notes that we really are not good at detecting faked photos.
  • Dangerous Minds shares some vintage photos of strippers from the 1960s.
  • Michael Sacasas of The Frailest Things looks, again, at the technologically enchanted world.
  • Language Log takes issue with the dismissive treatment of “… in a woodpile.” The expression is poison.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the dual position of the camel among the Sahrawi, as wild and tame at once.
  • Neuroskeptic looks at the problems of neuroscience, statistically.
  • The NYR Daily considers the hacking of the American vote. Who did it? Who gained?
  • Science Sushi notes that climate change threats African wild dogs’ survival.
  • Window on Eurasia notes an Armenian argument that Russia lacks the soft power that the Soviet Union once enjoyed.