A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘galaxies

[NEWS] Five D-Brief links: rats and cars, gravitational lensing, black holes, geodes, dark matter

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  • D-Brief notes the glorious science produced by scientists who trained rats to drive miniature cars and found that, in so doing, the rats’ stress was relieved.
  • D-Brief reports on how scientists used gravitational lensing to study a galaxy nine billion light-years away.
  • D-Brief explains how, in dwarf galaxies, supermassive black holes can stop star formation.
  • D-Brief looks at how scientists have found the giant Geode of Pulpi was created.
  • D-Brief notes how dark matter is making some spiral galaxies rotate at well over 500 kilometres a second.

Written by Randy McDonald

October 24, 2019 at 8:00 pm

[NEWS] Five space science links: Mars, Phobos and Deimos, Psyche, GSN O69, galaxies

  • Universe Today looks at the explosions of sand which mark spring on Mars, here.
  • The Mars moons of Phobos and Deimos are excellent first stops for crewed missions, Universe Today argues here.
  • Universe Today notes that, in their hot youth, metal asteroids like Psyche might have had volcanoes ejecting molten iron.
  • The supermassive black hole at the heart of galaxy GSN 069 is eating something on a 9 hour cycle. Universe Today explains.
  • What is killing star formation in the distant galaxies of the Virgo Cluster? The Conversation reports.

Written by Randy McDonald

September 19, 2019 at 10:30 pm

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes how variable gravity is on irregular asteroid Bennu.
  • Bruce Dorminey reports on how the European Southern Observatory has charted the Magellanic Clouds in unprecedented detail.
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares a collection of links looking at the Precambrian Earth.
  • Andrew LePage at Drew Ex Machina reports on the late 1950s race to send probes to the Moon.
  • Gizmodo shares some stunning astronomy photos.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on the saltwater roads, the routes that slaves in Florida used to escape to the free Bahamas.
  • Language Log looks at some examples of bad English from Japan. How did they come about?
  • Paul Campos at Lawyers, Guns and Money rejects the idea of honouring people like Condoleezza Rice.
  • Marginal Revolution considers the idea of free will in light of neurology.
  • Corey S Powell at Out There interviews James Lovelock on his new book Novacene, in which Lovelock imagines the future world and Gaia taken over by AI.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the water shortages faced by downstream countries in Central Asia.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Architectuul shares photos from a bike tour of Berlin.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait reports on new evidence that exocomets are raining on star Beta Pictoris.
  • Larry Klaes at Centauri Dreams reviews the two late 1970s SF films Alien and Star Trek I, products of the same era.
  • D-Brief reports on Hubble studies of the star clusters of the Large Magellanic Cloud.
  • Bruce Dorminey shares Gemini telescope images of interstellar comet C/2019 Q4 (Borisov).
  • The Dragon’s Tales shares video of Space X’s Starhopper test flight.
  • Far Outliers notes the import of the 13th century Norman king of England calling himself Edward after an Anglo-Saxon king.
  • Gizmodo notes that not only can rats learn to play hide and seek, they seem to enjoy it.
  • io9 notes the fantastic high camp of Mister Sinister in the new Jonathan Hickman X-Men run, borrowing a note from Kieron Gillen’s portrayal of the character.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that Guiliani’s soon-to-be ex-wife says he has descended from 911 hero to a liar.
  • Language Log looks at the recent ridiculous suggestion that English, among other languages, descends from Chinese.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the brief history of commemorating the V2 attacks on London.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the practice in Saskatchewan of sterilizing First Nations women against their consent.
  • Marginal Revolution suggests that farmers in Brazil might be getting a partly unfair treatment. (Partly.)
  • The Planetary Society Blog explains why C/2019 Q4 (Borisov) matters.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that, for the first time, immigrants from Turkmenistan in Belarus outnumber immigrants from Ukraine.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • The Buzz shares a TIFF reading list, here.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the growing sensitivity of radial velocity techniques in finding weird exoplanet HR 5183 b, here.
  • The Crux reports on circumgalactic gas and the death of galaxies.
  • Dead Things notes the import of the discovery of the oldest known Australopithecine skull.
  • Dangerous Minds reports on pioneering 1930s queer artist Hannah Gluckstein, also known as Gluck.
  • Gizmodo notes that, for an unnamed reason, DARPA needs a large secure underground testing facility for tomorrow.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how Jim Crow laws affected Mexican immigrants in the early 20th century US.
  • Language Hat looks at a new project to study Irish texts and language over centuries.
  • Language Log shares some Chinglish signs from a top university in China.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money shares an interview with Jeffrey Melnick suggesting Charles Manson was substantially a convenient boogeyman.
  • Marginal Revolution shares a paper suggesting marijuana legalization is linked to declining crime rates.
  • Susan Neiman at the NYR Daily tells how she began her life as a white woman in Atlanta and is ending it as a Jewish woman in Berlin.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at Hayabusa2 at Ryugu.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel celebrated the 230th anniversary of Enceladus, the Saturn moon that might harbour life.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how global warming is harming the rivers of Siberia, causing many to run short.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares images of galaxy M61.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at a proposal for the Solar Cruiser probe, a NASA probe that would use a solar sail.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of bacteria on coasts which manufacture dimethyl sulfide.
  • Bruce Dorminey writes about some facts about the NASA X-15 rocket plane.
  • The Dragon’s Tales reports on the strange nuclear accident in Nyonoksa, Russia.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on the recent uncovering of the ancient Egyptian city of Heracleion, under the Mediterranean.
  • Language Hat looks at 19th century standards on ancient Greek language.
  • Language Log notes an ironically swapped newspaper article subhead.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the role of Tom Cotton in the recent Greenland scandal.
  • Marginal Revolution glances at the relationship between China and Singapore.
  • The NYR Daily looks at how the car ride played a role in the writing of Jacques Lacan.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares an index on state fragility around the world.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why Jupiter suffers so many impacts from incoming bodies.
  • John Scalzi at Whatever reports on what seems to have been an enjoyable concert experience with Iron Maiden.
  • Window on Eurasia reports a claim that, with regards to a border dispute, Chechnya is much more unified than Dagestan.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait looks at the strange galaxy NGC 5866.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly looks at some of her prep work when she covers a news story.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the idea of using the Earth itself for gravitational lensing.
  • D-Brief notes a newly-discovered fossil parrot from New Zealand, a bird nearly one metre in size.
  • Far Outliers looks at the values of cowrie shells in 19th century central Africa. What could they buy?
  • Gizmodo notes the limited circumstances in which IMDb will allow transgender people to remove their birth names from their records.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the abortive American state of Franklin.
  • Language Hat notes a 19th century Russian exile’s experience with the differences between Norwegian and Swedish.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes, after Epstein, the incompetence that too often characterizes American prisons.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the importance of slavery in the history of Venice.
  • The NYR Daily notes how W.H. Auden was decidedly unimpressed by the Apollo moon landing, and why.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the import of astronomers’ discovery of an ancient early black hole.
  • Strange Maps’ Frank Jacobs shares a vertical world map from China.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little considers how competent the Nuclear Regulatory Commission actually is.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the internal divides of Russia.