A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘gardening

[PHOTO] No excuses for not gardening properly this spring

No excuses #toronto #theannex #dollarama #gardening #seeds #latergram

Written by Randy McDonald

March 26, 2020 at 3:15 pm

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Matt Thompson at anthro{dendum} writes about the complex, often anthropological, satire in the comics of Charles Addams.
  • Architectuul looks at the photography of Roberto Conte.
  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait notes a new computer model suggesting a supernova can be triggered by throwing a white dwarf into close orbit of a black hole.
  • D-Brief notes how ammonia on the surface of Pluto hints at the existence of a subsurface ocean.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes how the bombardment of Earth by debris from a nearby supernova might have prompted early hominids to become bipedal.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that NASA has awarded its first contract for its plans in lunar space.
  • Far Outliers notes the reactions, within and without the Soviet Union, to the 1991 Soviet coup attempt.
  • Matt Novak at Gizmodo’s Paleofuture notes how, in 1995, Terry Pratchett predicted the rise of online Nazis.
  • io9 notes the impending physical release this summer of DVDs of the Deep Space Nine documentary What We Left Behind.
  • JSTOR Daily suggests some ways to start gardening in your apartment.
  • Victor Mair at Language Log claims that learning Literary Chinese is a uniquely difficult experience. Thoughts?
  • The NYR Daily features a wide-ranging interview with EU official Michel Barnier focused particularly, but not exclusively, on Brexit.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes that an Internet vote has produced a majority in favour of naming outer system body 2007 OR10 Gonggang.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer considers the possibility that foreign investors in Mexico might be at risk, at least feel themselves at risk, from the government of AMLO.
  • The Signal looks at how the Library of Congress archives spreadsheets.
  • Van Waffle at the Speed River Journal looks at magenta spreen, a colourful green that he grows in his garden.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how we on Earth are carelessly wasting irreplaceable helium.
  • Window on Eurasia refers to reports claiming that a third of the population of Turkmenistan has fled that Central Asian state. Could this be accurate?

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

Many things accumulated after a pause of a couple of months. Here are some of the best links to come about in this time.

  • Anthrodendum considers the issue of the security, or not, of cloud data storage used by anthropologists.
  • Architectuul takes a look at the very complex history of urban planning and architecture in the city of Skopje, linked to issues of disaster and identity.
  • Centauri Dreams features an essay by Ioannis Kokkidinis, examining the nature of the lunar settlement of Artemis in Andy Weir’s novel of the same. What is it?
  • Crux notes the possibility that human organs for transplant might one day soon be grown to order.
  • D-Brief notes evidence that extrasolar visitor ‘Oumuamua is actually more like a comet than an asteroid.
  • Bruce Dorminey makes the sensible argument that plans for colonizing Mars have to wait until we save Earth. (I myself have always thought the sort of environmental engineering necessary for Mars would be developed from techniques used on Earth.)
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog took an interesting look at the relationship between hobbies and work.
  • Far Outliers looks at how, in the belle époque, different European empires took different attitudes towards the emigration of their subjects depending on their ethnicity. (Russia was happy to be rid of Jews, while Hungary encouraged non-Magyars to leave.)
  • The Finger Post shares some photos taken by the author on a trip to the city of Granada, in Nicaragua.
  • The Frailest Thing’s L.M. Sacasas makes an interesting argument as to the extent to which modern technology creates a new sense of self-consciousness in individuals.
  • Inkfish suggests that the bowhead whale has a more impressive repertoire of music–of song, at least–than the fabled humpback.
  • Information is Beautiful has a wonderful illustration of the Drake Equation.
  • JSTOR Daily takes a look at the American women who tried to prevent the Trail of Tears.
  • Language Hat takes a look at the diversity of Slovene dialects, this diversity perhaps reflecting the stability of the Slovene-inhabited territories over centuries.
  • Language Log considers the future of the Cantonese language in Hong Kong, faced with pressure from China.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how negatively disruptive a withdrawal of American forces from Germany would be for the United States and its position in the world.
  • Lingua Franca, at the Chronicle, notes the usefulness of the term “Latinx”.
  • The LRB Blog reports on the restoration of a late 19th century Japanese-style garden in Britain.
  • The New APPS Blog considers the ways in which Facebook, through the power of big data, can help commodify personal likes.
  • Neuroskeptic reports on the use of ayahusasca as an anti-depressant. Can it work?
  • Justin Petrone, attending a Nordic scientific conference in Iceland to which Estonia was invited, talks about the frontiers of Nordic identity.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw writes about what it is to be a literary historian.
  • Drew Rowsome praises Dylan Jones’ new biographical collection of interviews with the intimates of David Bowie.
  • Peter Rukavina shares an old Guardian article from 1993, describing and showing the first webserver on Prince Edward Island.
  • Seriously Science notes the potential contagiousness of parrot laughter.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little t.com/2018/06/shakespeare-on-tyranny.htmltakes a look at the new Stephen Greenblatt book, Shakespeare on Power, about Shakespeare’s perspectives on tyranny.
  • Window on Eurasia shares speculation as to what might happen if relations between Russia and Kazakhstan broke down.
  • Worthwhile Canadian Initiative noticed, before the election, the serious fiscal challenges facing Ontario.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell points out that creating a national ID database in the UK without issuing actual cards would be a nightmare.
  • Arnold Zwicky reports on a strand of his Swiss family’s history found in a Paris building.

[PHOTO] Sprouting garlic bulbs

It will be time to garden again, very soon. These cloves of garlic will do nicely as a first planting.

Sprouting garlic bulbs #toronto #spring #garlic #gardening

Written by Randy McDonald

April 24, 2018 at 1:15 pm

Posted in Photo, Toronto

Tagged with , , ,

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Anthrodendum takes a look at the way community knowledge is now being subject to a privatization.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlyn Kelly starts a discussion about what makes home.
  • Bruce Dorminey suggests a pre-Theia, Moon-sized impactor gave the Earth its metal crust.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze looks at the current state of knowledge about Proxima b.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that Russia is apparently testing advanced nuclear weapons.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas considers the religious impulse in so many technophiles’ view of the world.
  • Language Hat considers the dynamics associated with learning minority languages in Europe.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money shares a classic traffic safety clip from 1913.
  • The LRB Blog mourns the loss of Glen Newey, long-time contributor.
  • Lovesick Cyborg notes a NASA study into the economics of a viable space-based solar power project.
  • Roads and Kingdoms takes a look at the açorda of Portugal, a bread-based broth that was a long-time food of the poor.
  • Cheri Lucas Rowlands celebrates the passage of summer into fall through photos of her vegetable garden.
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at the representation of LGBTQ people on television, and sees much reason for cheer.
  • Science Sushi notes that different dolphin groups seem to have different dialects.
  • Understanding Society takes a look at Robert Merton’s refinement of social functionalism.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that many ethnic Russians in Belarus, as in Ukraine, have shifted identity to that of the titular nation.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell notes one mistake made about artificial intelligence: it is not automatically more accurate.

[URBAN NOTE] “Toronto laneway to be turned into community garden”

Derek Flack’s blogTO report is fascinating. I will definitely be doing an expedition out to the Milky Way.

Running just south of Queen St. to the west of Dufferin, Milky Way is one of those Toronto laneways worth writing a love letter about. There’s excellent graffiti, people regularly use it as a quieter alternative to walking/riding on Queen, and over the years various art spaces have called the place home.

Now, the laneway could also be home to an urban garden. The Parkdale Neighbourhood Land Trust (PNLT) & Greenest City have joined forces to acquire the space at 87 Milky Way in an effort to set up a community garden here. The two groups are launching a fundraising campaign later this week for part of the sum required to take possession of the land.

Written by Randy McDonald

May 17, 2016 at 6:30 pm

[URBAN NOTE] “Toronto Botanical Gardens is a metropolis of plants, animals and insects”

Why did I not know of the Toronto Botanical Gardens before now? Thanks to Shawn Micallef in the Toronto Star for alerting me to the existence of the place.

Trinity Bellwoods Park has its famous white squirrel, making rare appearances shared delightedly on social media, a kind of urban badge one achieves in downtown Toronto. However, the Toronto Botanical Gardens (TBG) in North York may have the city’s friendliest squirrel, who stands on his hind legs with his hands clasped together, plaintively looking you in the eye.

“Go away, Freddie,” says Paul Zammit, sighing. “People have been feeding him.”

Zammit is the director of horticulture at the TBG, and as he surveys the site he points out squirrels, hawks, ground hogs and mouselike voles that make their home among the 3,600 different kinds of plants he cares for.

“Gardens are opportunity,” says Zammit, wandering between planting beds, naming off dozens of different kinds. “A garden isn’t just esthetic, there’s an opportunity to educate.”

Bees are one way to educate. On site there is both a “bee hotel” and collection of hives they call a pollinator garden. Zammit explains many bees don’t sting, nor do many produce honey, but they are integral to the garden’s biodiversity. Apart from Zammit, there is only one full time and one seasonal gardener to take care of all of this, but 40 volunteer gardeners also pitch in.

Written by Randy McDonald

May 14, 2016 at 8:30 pm

[NEWS] Some Friday links

  • Atlas Obscura looks at the 18th century British tradition of installing hermits in gardens.
  • Bloomberg looks at Brexit proponents who say the United Kingdom can arrange a better deal with the European Union than Switzerland, notes continued anger after the housing collapse, and studies prospects for light rail in Los Angeles.
  • CBC notes the death of K-Tel founder Phil Kives and looks at fracking damage in Oklahoma.
  • MacLean’s notes that a former PQ minister who blames Liberal strength on English and Allophone voters does not know demographics.
  • National Geographic looks at Pripyat as a modern equivalent to Pompeii.
  • Open Democracy looks at the particular dynamics behind right-wing populism in Estonia.
  • Quartz notes the rise of the megacity.
  • The Toronto Star notes lessons Toronto can take from New York City on building better streets.
  • Vice looks at how the ability to learn does not require a nervous system.
  • Wired looks at the reason for the odd roads of Kansas.

[PHOTO] On the import of the spring seeds rack at Dollarama

Sign of approaching spring #toronto #theannex #dollarama #gardening #seeds

One sure sign of spring’s approach is the arrival of racks at local Dollaramas, carrying packets of seeds.

Written by Randy McDonald

February 23, 2016 at 11:36 am

Posted in Photo, Toronto

Tagged with , , , ,

[PHOTO] My garden pots, September 2015

The garden #toronto #garden #potgarden

Written by Randy McDonald

September 4, 2015 at 1:36 am

Posted in Photo, Toronto

Tagged with , , ,