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[BLOG] Some Monday links

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  • At anthro{dendum}, Amarilys Estrella writes about the aftermath of a car accident she experienced while doing fieldwork.
  • Architectuul notes at a tour of Berlin looking at highlights from an innovative year for architecture in West Berlin back in 1987.
  • Bad Astronomer notes that interstellar comet 2/Borisov is behaving surprisingly normally.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes briefly about the difficulty, and the importance, of being authentic.
  • Centauri Dreams shares some of the recent findings of Voyager 2 from the edge of interstellar space.
  • Crooked Timber shares a photo of a courtyard in Montpellier.
  • D-Brief notes a study of the genetics of ancient Rome revealing that the city once was quite cosmopolitan, but that this cosmopolitanism passed, too.
  • Dangerous Minds notes a 1972 single where Marvin Gaye played the Moog.
  • Cody Delistraty looks at Degas and the opera.
  • Bruce Dorminey makes a case, scientific and otherwise, against sending animals into space.
  • Far Outliers looks at a 1801 clash between the American navy and Tripoli pirates.
  • Gizmodo notes a theory that ancient primates learned to walk upright in trees.
  • Joe. My. God. notes that the Cayman Islands overturned a court ruling calling for marriage equality.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the experience of women under Reconstruction.
  • Language Hat notes the exceptional multilingualism of the Qing empire.
  • Language Log looks at circumstances where the Roman alphabet is used in contemporary China.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the forced resignation of Evo Morales in Bolivia, and calls for readers to take care with their readings on the crisis and the country.
  • Marginal Revolution considers a new sociological theory suggesting that the medieval Christian church enacted policy which made the nuclear family, not the extended family, the main structure in Europe and its offshoots.
  • Sean Marshall takes a look at GO Transit fare structures, noting how users of the Kitchener line may pay more than their share.
  • Neuroskeptic takes a look at the contradictions between self-reported brain activity and what brain scanners record.
  • Alex Hutchinson writes at the NYR Daily about human beings and their relationship with wilderness.
  • Jim Belshaw at Personal Reflections considers the impact of drought in Australia’s New England, and about the need for balances.
  • The Planetary Society Blog offers advice for people interested in seeing today’s transit of Mercury across the Sun.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer suggests Argentines may not have cared about their national elections as much as polls suggested.
  • Peter Rukavina shares an image of an ancient Charlottetown traffic light, at Prince and King.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog notes the significant convergence, and remaining differences, between East and West Germany.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at some of the backstory to the Big Bang.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy suggests the Paris Accords were never a good way to deal with climate change.
  • Window on Eurasia shares someone arguing the policies of Putin are simple unoriginal Bonapartism.
  • Worthwhile Canadian Economy makes the case that slow economic recoveries are deep economic recoveries.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell looks at how the failure of the media to serve as effective critics of politics has helped lead, in the UK of Brexit, to substantial political change.
  • Arnold Zwicky considers the idea, first expressed in comics, of Russian sardines.

[URBAN NOTE] Six Toronto links

  • Steve Munro looks at a recent examination by the Toronto auditor-general about the problems of Presto, here.
  • blogTO notes that, on the weekend of the 22nd, the Toronto Reference Library will host another book sale.
  • Spacing lets someone evicted for putting his apartment up for Airbnb tell his story.
  • Global News tells the story of Charlie’s Friend Art Caf√© in Bloordale, here.
  • This Toronto Life account of the life and crimes of Alek Minassian remains authentically disturbing to me.
  • The idea of a Toronto city charter, a constitution to protect the city’s prerogatives, does sound pretty good to me. CBC reports.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomer notes the circumstances of the discovery of a low-mass black hole, only 3.3 solar masses.
  • Crooked Timber shares a photo of the Topkapi Palace in Istanbul.
  • The Crux looks at Monte Verde, the site in Chile that has the evidence of the oldest human population known to have lived in South America.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that Russia may provide India with help in the design of its Gaganyaan manned capsule.
  • L.M. Sacasas at The Frailest Thing talks of his work, including his upcoming conference and his newsletter, The Convivial Society. (Subscribe at the website.)
  • Gizmodo shares the Voyager 2 report from the edges of interstellar space.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the East India Company and its corporate lobbying.
  • Language Hat shares an account from Ken Liu of the challenges in translating The Three Body Problem, linguistic and otherwise.
  • Language Log looks at the problems faced by the word “liberation” in Hong Kong.
  • Dan Nexon at Lawyers, Guns and Money looks at the implications of the surprising new relationship between Russia and the Philippines.
  • Marginal Revolution seems to like Terminator: Dark Fate, as a revisiting of the series’ origins, with a Mesoamerican twist.
  • Sean Marshall announces his attendance at a transit summit in Guelph on Saturday the 9th.
  • Garry Wills writes at the NYR Daily about his experience as a man in the mid-20th century American higher education looking at the rise of women.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel looks at the strangely faint distant young galaxy MACS2129-1.
  • Window on Eurasia considers the possibility of Latvia developing a national Eastern Orthodox church of its own.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomy notes the mystery of distant active galaxy SDSS J163909+282447.1, with a supermassive black hole but few stars.
  • Centauri Dreams shares a proposal from Robert Buckalew for craft to engage in planned panspermia, seeding life across the galaxy.
  • The Crux looks at the theremin and the life of its creator, Leon Theremin.
  • D-Brief notes that termites cannibalize their dead, for the good of the community.
  • Dangerous Minds looks at William Burroughs’ Blade Runner, an adaptation of a 1979 science fiction novel by Alan Nourse.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes a new study explaining how the Milky Way Galaxy, and the rest of the Local Group, was heavily influenced by its birth environment.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at why the Chernobyl control room is now open for tourists.
  • Dale Campos at Lawyers. Guns and Money looks at the effects of inequality on support for right-wing politics.
  • James Butler at the LRB Blog looks at the decay and transformation of British politics, with Keith Vaz and Brexit.
  • Marginal Revolution shares a paper explaining why queens are more warlike than kings.
  • Omar G. Encarnaci√≥n at the NYR Daily looks at how Spain has made reparations to LGBTQ people for past homophobia. Why should the United States not do the same?
  • Corey S. Powell at Out There shares his interview with physicist Sean Carroll on the reality of the Many Worlds Theory. There may be endless copies of each of us out there. (Where?)
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why 5G is almost certainly safe for humans.
  • Strange Company shares a newspaper clipping reporting on a haunting in Wales’ Plas Mawr castle.
  • Frank Jacobs at Strange Maps looks at all the different names for Africa throughout the years.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy considers, in the case of the disposal of eastern Oklahoma, whether federal Indian law should be textualist. (They argue against.)
  • Window on Eurasia notes the interest of the government of Ukraine in supporting Ukrainians and other minorities in Russia.
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at syntax on signs for Sloppy Joe’s.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomy notes the new X-ray telescope eROSITA.
  • Centauri Dreams notes evidence of a recent collision between planets in the system of BD +20 307.
  • D-Brief notes the appearance of a strange new sort of storm on Saturn.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes the discovery by astronomers of a set of orbits that can direct comets into the inner solar system.
  • Drew Ex Machina’s Andrew LePage shares some vintage Skylab photos of his native Massachusetts.
  • Far Outliers notes how, in 1786, the United states was uninclined to pay tribute to the Barbary States.
  • Gizmodo’s George Dvorsky reports on a new fossil discovery showing how quickly mammals took over after the Cretaceous.
  • The Island Review shares an essay by photographer Alex Boyd about his new book Isles of Rust, drawing from Lewis & Harris.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at sustainable butchery.
  • Language Hat notes that Sumerian cuneiform is now in Unicode.
  • Victor Mair at Language Log notes how the Indo-Iranian “don” so commonly forms part of the hydronyms for major European rivers.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money calls for an in-depth investigation of Donald Trump, not necessarily an impeachment.
  • The LRB Blog examines the background of the mass protests in Santiago and wider Chile.
  • The Map Room Blog shares an illuminating cartogram depicting the #elxn43 results in Canada.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at how the government of China has been using the NBA to buy social peace.
  • The NYR Daily interviews Naomi Oreskes about her campaign to have the science behind global warming, and the actions of the scientists involved, understood.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog links to a paper concluding that traditional gender specializations in British families no longer provide a reproductive advantage.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why the speed of gravity must equal the speed of light, if general relativity is to work.
  • Window on Eurasia examines the rapid and uncontrolled growth of urban populations in Kazakhstan.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes how a photo of the Large Magellanic Cloud makes him recognize it as an irregular spiral, not a blob.
  • Centauri Dreams celebrates the life of cosmonaut Alexei Leonov.
  • John Quiggin at Crooked Timber takes issue with one particular claim about the benefits of war and empire.
  • The Crux looks at fatal familial insomnia, a genetic disease that kills through inflicting sleeplessness on its victims.
  • D-Brief looks at suggestions that magnetars are formed by the collisions of stars.
  • Dangerous Minds introduces readers to the fantasy art of Arthur Rackham.
  • Cody Delistraty considers some evidence suggesting that plants have a particular kind of intelligence.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes the expansion by Russia of its airbase in Hneymim, Syria.
  • Karen Sternheimer writes at the Everyday Sociology Blog about the critical and changing position of libraries as public spaces in our cities.
  • Gizmodo looks at one marvelous way scientists have found to cheat quantum mechanics.
  • Information is Beautiful outlines a sensible proposal to state to cultivate seaweed a as source of food and fuel.
  • io9 notes that, in the exciting new X-Men relaunch, immortal Moira MacTaggart is getting her own solo book.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how the now-defunct Thomas Cook travel agency played a role in supporting British imperialism, back in the day.
  • Language Log notes that the Oxford English Dictionary is citing the blog on the use of “their” as a singular.
  • Scott Lemieux at Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the grounds for impeaching Donald Trump.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the politics of Mozambique at the country approaches dangerous times.
  • Sean Marshall notes the southern Ontario roads that run to Paris and to London.
  • Neuroskeptic notes a problematic scientific study that tried to use rabbits to study the female human orgasm.
  • Steve Baker at The Numerati looks at a new book on journalism by veteran Peter Copeland.
  • The NYR Daily makes the point that depending on biomass as a green energy solution is foolish.
  • The Planetary Science Blog notes a 1983 letter by then-president Carl Sagan calling for a NASA mission to Saturn and Titan.
  • Roads and Kingdoms interviews photojournalist Eduardo Leal on his home city of Porto, particularly as transformed by tourism.
  • Drew Rowsome notes the book Dreamland, an examination of the early amusement park.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog shares a paper considering, in broad detail, how the consequence of population aging could be mitigated in the labour market of the European Union.
  • Strange Company reports on a bizarre poltergeist in a British garden shed.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the new strength of a civic national identity in Kazakhstan, based on extensive polling.
  • Arnold Zwicky, surely as qualified a linguist as any, examines current verb of the American moment, “depose”.

[NEWS] Ten JSTOR Daily links: Beowulf, grain and beer, Sinclair, birds, TV, books …

  • JSTOR Daily considers race as a subject for discussion in Beowulf.
  • JSTOR Daily suggests the possibility that grain was domesticated not to produce bread, but rather to produce beer.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how the wild rice of North America resisted efforts at domestication.
  • JSTOR Daily notes the Outer Banks Brewing Station, a North Carolina brewery powered by wind energy.
  • JSTOR Daily shares a classic essay by Upton Sinclair from 1906 on the issues of the American economy.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at the history of the pet bird in the 19th century United States.
  • JSTOR Daily considers the ways in which streaming television might not fragment markets and nations.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on how Sylvia Beach, with help, opened legendary Paris bookstore Shakespeare & Co.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on the surprisingly democratic origins of the Great Books of American literature.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on how the horror movies of the 1970s and 1980s captured a new female audience by having more appealing girl and woman characters.