A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘gender

[NEWS] Five Canadian culture links: Diverse churches, First Nations Winnipeg, Tim Horton’s, gender

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  • CTV News U>reports on how established churches in Canada, facing falling attendance, are trying to reach out to new demographics.
  • The South China Morning Post reports on how Winnipeg is striving to include and represent First Nations cultures, here.
  • In the wake of its foreign buyout and the bad publicity after Ontario’s minimum wage increase, Tim Horton’s reputation among Canadians–especially as a Canadian community–seems shot. The Globe and Mail reports.
  • Robyn Doolittle wonders why, in an upcoming movie inspired by the Rob Ford saga, the role based on her of a journalist whose research blew the scandal open is going to be played by a male actor. (Rightfully so, I think.) The National Post has it.
  • Michelle Da Silva interviews a collection of men (and others) about their perceptions of masculinity in the era of #metoo, here.
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[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Anthropology.net’s Kambiz Kamrani looks at the classical Mayan trade in pets, dogs and cats particularly.
  • Dangerous Minds shares some vintage cheesecake ads for video and arcade games from 1980s Japan.
  • Dead Things considers an examination of the thesis that the fabulous horns of some dinosaurs were used as sexual signals.
  • Hornet Stories nominates some queer people to get stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.
  • JSTOR Daily tells the story of Bobbi Gibb, the woman who in 1966 crashed the Boston Marathon.
  • Language Hattells of Toty Samed, an Angolan musician who writes songs not in the now-dominant Portuguese but in his ancestral Kimbundu.
  • Steven Attewell at Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the ways in which the metaphor of mutants has been used by Marvel Comics to explore themes of racism and marginalization.
  • At the LRB Blog, Matthew Porges notes how European Union opposition to the annexation of Western Sahara by Morocco is counterbalanced by the need to keep Morocco as a partner.
  • r/mapporn shared a beautiful map of the Great Lakes, Nayanno-Nibiimaang Gichigamiin or “The Five Freshwater Seas”, from the Ojibwe perspective.
  • The Map Room Blog shares Christian Tate’s transit-style map of Middle Earth.
  • Marginal Revolution links to an essay arguing against the United States’ dropping the penny and the nickel, on the grounds that these expensive coins are loss-leaders for currency generally.
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at early 20th century Russian philosopher Ivan Ilyan, a man whose influence is visible in the Putin era.
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at the eye-catching male photography of Ekaterina Zakharova.
  • David Post’s analysis at the Volokh Conspiracy of the contract between Stormy Daniels and Donald Trump is a must-read.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how the Russian government has failed to cultivate soft power, or wider influence, in the West.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Anthropology.net’s Kambiz Kamrani notes evidence that environmental change in Kenya may have driven creativity in early human populations there.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shows how astronomers use stellar occultations to investigate the thin atmosphere of Neptune’s moon Triton.
  • Centauri Dreams notes how melting ice creates landscape change on Ceres.
  • D-Brief suggests that supervolcanoes do not pose such a huge risk to the survival of humanity, in the past or the future, as we thoughts.
  • Dangerous Minds shares Paul Bowles’ recipe for a Moroccan love charm.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog investigates the transformation of shopping malls and in the era of Amazon Prime.
  • At In Medias Res, Russell Arben Fox engages with Left Behind and that book’s portrayal of rural populations in the United States which feel left behind.
  • JSTOR Daily looks at how Roman Catholic nuns on the 19th century American frontier challenged gender norms.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money is critical of Tex-Mex cuisine, calling it an uncreative re-presentation of Mexican cuisine for white people in high-calorie quantities.
  • The NYR Daily shared this thought-provoking article noting how Irish America, because of falling immigration from Ireland and growing liberalism on that island, is diverging from its ancestral homeland.
  • Drew Rowsome reviews The Monument, a powerful play currently on in Toronto that engages with the missing and murdered native women.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes, in a photo-heavy post, how galaxies die (or at least, how they stop forming stars).
  • Towleroad shares a delightful interview with Adam Rippon conducted over a plate of hot wings.
  • Window on Eurasia shares an alternate history article imagining what would have become of Russia had Muscovy not conquered Novgorod.
  • Worthwhile Canadian Initiative notes the very sharp rise in public debt held by the province of Ontario, something that accelerated in recent years.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell suggests, in the era of Cambridge Analytica and fake news, that many journalists seem not to take their profession seriously enough.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • At Anthropology.net, Kamzib Kamrani looks at the Yamnaya horse culture of far eastern Europe and their connection to the spread of the Indo-Europeans.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the predicted collision of China’s Tiangong-1 space station. Where will it fall?
  • James Bow notes a Kickstarter funding effort to revive classic Canadian science fiction magazine Amazing Stories.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the impending retirement of the pioneering Kepler telescope, and what’s being done in the time before this retirement.
  • D-Brief notes how nanowires made of gold and titanium were used to restore the sight of blind mice.
  • Russell Darnley takes a look at the indigenous people of Riau province, the Siak, who have been marginalized by (among other things) the Indonesian policy of transmigration.
  • Dead Things reports on more evidence of Denisovan ancestry in East Asian populations, with the suggestion that the trace of Denisovan ancestry in East Asia came from a different Denisovan population than the stronger traces in Melanesia.
  • Hornet Stories paints a compelling portrait of the West Texas oasis-like community of Marfa.
  • JSTOR Daily notes how indigenous mythology about illness was used to solve a hantavirus outbreak in New Mexico in the 1990s.
  • Language Log praises the technical style of a Google Translate translation of a text from German to English.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that, under the Shah, Iran was interested in building nuclear plants. Iranian nuclear aspirations go back a long way.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the unsettling elements of the literary, and other, popularity of Jordan Peterson.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the continuing existence of a glass ceiling even in relatively egalitarian Iceland.
  • The NYR Daily looks at the unsettling elements behind the rise of Xi Jinping to unchecked power. Transitions from an oligarchy to one-man rule are never good for a country, never mind one as big as China.
  • Drew Rowsome writes about Love, Cecil, a new film biography of photographer Cecil Beaton.
  • Peter Rukavina celebrates the 25th anniversary of his move to Prince Edward Island. That province, my native one, is much the better for his having moved there. Congratulations!
  • Window on Eurasia looks at a strange story of Russian speculation about Kazakh pan-Turkic irredentism for Orenburg that can be traced back to one of its own posts.
  • At Worthwhile Canadian Initiative, Frances Woolley takes the time to determine that Canadian university professors tend to be more left-wing than the general Canadian population, and to ask why this is the case.

[NEWS] Five LGBTQ links: Toronto, Daniel Mallory Ortberg, Melvin Iscove, Michelle Visage, drag kings

  • People interviewed by front-line police regarding the Church-Wellesley serial killer affair suggest that, if there was any problem, it was certainly not with the sensitive and informed front-line officers. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Heather Havrilesky at The Cut interviews Daniel Mallory Ortberg and, in so doing, celebrates his outing himself as trans.
  • The medical license of Dr. Melvin Iscove, who as a psychiatrist practiced conversion therapy without quite admitting to it, has been suspended following findings that he had sex with his male patients. The Toronto Star reports.
  • In a wide-ranging interview, E. Alex Jung talks with Michelle Visage about RuPaul’s drag ace, her life, and the changing lines between gay and trans, gender and sexuality, that she has seen since the 1980s, over</a at Vulture.
  • Hazel Cills at Jezebel takes a look at drag kings. I’d not heard of them in a while: What are they doing? What is this genderbending cultural form evolving into? They need more prominence.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the oddly recognizable shape of the Horsehead Nebula, and the reasons for this.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes how exceptionally difficult it is for current astronomers to track the transformation of stardust into planets.
  • Gizmodo notes a new theory for the formation of the Moon suggesting that, instead of condensing from the debris left by a Mars-mass object’s collision with the Earth, it condensed along with the Earth from a synestia.
  • JSTOR Daily notes an Indian entrepreneur who developed a generator transforming rice husks into electrical power for an entire village.
  • Language Hat takes a critical look at some of the claims made in a recent article suggesting Icelandic is at risk of extinction.
  • Elaine Showalter writes at the NYR Daily about the power of feminist fantasy and science fiction literature.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes the apparent detection of the earliest-forming stars in the universe and their relationship with dark matter.
  • Strange Company notes the mysterious 1885 disappearance of New York City editor Samuel Stillman Conant. What happened to him? Why did he apparently abandon a happy life?
  • Whatever shares an idea for a fantasy universe from Tobias Buckell, imagining a world where magic has individual benefits but a terrible cost to the world at large. How would it be used?
  • Arnold Zwicky notes the death of Broadway and television star Nanette Fabray.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Centauri Dreams considers methods for detecting early life telescopically on exoplanets.
  • Crooked Timber considers how legislators bear personal responsibility, morally at least, for consequences of the legislations that they pass.
  • Bruce Dorminey reports that the new TESS telescope may well be capable of spotting dense clouds of satellites in geosynchronous orbit of exoplanets as distant as 100 light years.
  • Far Outliers considers how in Iran, the veil worn by a woman was a status symbol, for her husband and family as much as for the woman.
  • Language Hat reports on the strange survival of the classical manuscript Alexandra.
  • Language Log suggests that the Confucius Institute network set up by China does not seem to spread Chinese language so much as Chinese culture.
  • As the Mueller investigation continues, Lawyers, Guns and Money suggests many of the players in the Trump Administration are facing a real-life version of the prisoner’s dilemma.
  • The Map Room Blog notes how maps of London’s Chiswick have been compiled into a public mural.
  • The NYR Daily has an amusing sketched review of the Michaelangelo exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum. (My pictures will be coming!)
  • Drew Rowsome takes a look at some of the fashion unveiled by Gucci in their recent Milan show.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains how cosmic inflation means that, despite the speed of light and the universe’s age of 13.8 billion years, we can see things now 46 billion light years away.
  • Understanding Society’s Daniel Little looks at some of the social factors going into nuclear accidents.
  • Window on Eurasia reports a familiar sort of pattern, of Central Asian migrants held in Russian prisons spreading Islam among their fellow detainees.