A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘genocide

[NEWS] Five links: Brexit, left-wing denialism, Menshevik Georgia, immigrants in cities, Voyager

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  • Prospect Magazine shares Ivan Rogers’ inside perspective on how David Cameron’s misunderstanding of the political priorities in the wider EU was (mostly) responsible for the ill-judged decision to hold a referendum on Brexit.
  • Haaretz shares Oz Katerji’s devastating criticism of many left-wing intellectuals for turning a blind eye to genocides they find politically inconvenient. (Noam Chomsky, stand up please.)
  • Eric Lee suggests that the moderate Menshevik government that ruled Georgia for a few brief years offers insight into a more humanistic way that the Russian Revolution could have taken, over at Open Democracy.
  • Irena Guidikova suggests that initiatives taken at the level of the cities are most important for the integration of immigrants, that helping them build networks and acquire social capital must be central to any project, over at Open Democracy.
  • Matt Novak at Gizmodo’s Paleofuture notes that, after substantial work, copies of the Voyager Golden Record are finally available for purchase.
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[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • At Antipope, Charlie Stross examines the connections between bitcoin production and the alt-right. Could cryptocurrency have seriously bad political linkages?
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes GW170680, a recent gravitational wave detection that is both immense in its effect and surprising for its detection being normal.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on a new study suggesting hot Jupiters are so large because they are heated by their local star.
  • Crooked Timber counsels against an easy condemnation of baby boomers as uniquely politically malign.
  • Daily JSTOR notes one paper that takes a look at how the surprisingly late introduction of the bed, as a piece of household technology, changed the way we sleep.
  • Dangerous Minds shares a 1968 newspaper interview with Dennis Wilson of the Beach Boys, talking about Charlie Manson and his family and their influence on him.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog takes a look at the opioid epidemic and the way that it is perceived.
  • At A Fistful of Euros, Alex Harrowell suggests that the unsolvable complexities of Northern Ireland may be enough to avoid a hard Brexit after all.
  • The LRB Blog describes a visit to a seaside village in Costa Rica where locals and visitors try to save sea turtles.
  • Lingua Franca reflects on the beauty of the Icelandic language.
  • The Map Room Blog shares an awesome map depicting the locations of the stars around which we have detected exoplanets.
  • Marginal Revolution notes the ill health of North Korean defectors, infected with parasites now unseen in South Korea.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on the revival of fonio, a West African grain that is now starting to see successful marketing in Senegal.
  • Spacing reviews a fascinating book examining the functioning of urban villages embedded in the metropoli of south China.
  • Strange Company reports on the mysterious 1920 murder of famous bridge player Joseph Bowne Elwell.
  • Towleroad reports on Larnelle Foster, a gay black man who was a close friend of Meghan Markle in their college years.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that, although Ukraine suffered the largest number of premature dead in the Stalinist famines of the 1930s, Kazakhstan suffered the greatest proportion of dead.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell has a photo essay looking at the Berlin Brandenburg Airport, still years away from completion and beset by many complex failures of its advanced systems. What does the failure of this complex system say about others we may wish to build?

[NEWS] Five First Nations links: residential schools, Mohawk, native languages, Newtok, Métis claims

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  • Mario Canseco at the National Observer reports on a poll suggesting that Canadians generally are becoming more aware of the residential schools, though knowledge is uneven and far from uniform.
  • Six Nations Polytechnic has created a new Mohawk language learning app intended to help that Iroquoian language thrive again. Global News reports.
  • Chelsea Vowel makes a plea in Chatelaine for Canada to protect its indigenous languages, as is their right.
  • The Alaskan village of Newtok is literally sliding into an adjacent river, victim of (among other things) climate change. No one has been helping since the 1950s.
  • In eastern Canada, many people are starting to identify themselves as Métis without necessarily having verifiable Métis or Native ancestry. This can have significant consequences, financial and otherwise. The National Post reports.

Written by Randy McDonald

November 24, 2017 at 9:30 pm

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Centauri Dreams notes the remarkably complex system of Proxima Centauri, with multiple belts and more possible planets, as does D-Brief.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of a new sort of fusion reactions, involving not atoms but quarks.
  • Hornet Stories notes a new acoustic cover of the Kinky Boots song “Not My Father’s Son.”
  • Language Hat takes a brief look at Cyrillic, since the Soviet era written in Cyrillic script.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes how the Trump Administration is unconcerned by the latest report regarding catastrophic climate change.
  • The LRB Blog notes how Armenia and Armenians remember past genocides and current refugee flows.
  • The Planetary Society Blog notes the further extension of the Dawn mission at Ceres.
  • Drew Rowsome shares some of Stephen King’s tips for aspiring writers.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes how some long-exposure Hubble photographs of galaxies picked up nearby asteroids.
  • John Scalzi shares his cover of “Rocket Man”.
  • Window on Eurasia wonders if ISIS is spreading into Russia via migrant workers from Central Asia.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait reports on the naming of the features of the surface of Ceres.
  • D-Brief notes that small-scale robotic manufacturing is now a thing.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze reports on a new study of exoplanets and their stars.
  • The Dragon’s Tales has a nice round-up of news on hominin research and primates generally.
  • Hornet Stories notes that there is apparently a debate about women as drag queens. I don’t see why they should not, frankly.
  • Joe. My. God links to a Rolling Stone article celebrating Erotica and Sex, by Madonna, on their 25th anniversary.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the way Dollar General caters to a permanent underclass. Like Dollarama in Canada?
  • Language Hat notes that Xibe, related to Manchu, is receiving protection from China.
  • The NYR Daily reports on the mass killings, approaching genocide, in Indonesia in 1965.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel reports on the proofs we have for the current age of the universe.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at enormous, explosive Wolf-Rayet stars, and at WR 124 in particular.
  • The Big Picture shares heart-rending photos of Rohingya refugees fleeing Burma.
  • Centauri Dreams considers the potential of near-future robotic asteroid mining.
  • D-Brief notes the discovery of vast cave systems on the Moon, potential homes for settlers.
  • Hornet Stories exposes young children to Madonna’s hit songs and videos of the 1980s. She still has it.
  • Inkfish notes that a beluga raised in captivity among dolphins has picked up elements of their speech.
  • Language Hat notes a dubious claim that a stelae containing Luwian hieroglyphic script, from ancient Anatolia, has been translated.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the question of preserving brutalist buildings.
  • The LRB Blog considers how Brexit, intended to enhance British sovereignty and power, will weaken both.
  • The Map Room Blog notes that the moons and planets of the solar system have been added to Google Maps.
  • The NYR Daily considers how the Burmese government is carefully creating a case for Rohingya genocide.
  • The Power and Money’s Noel Maurer concludes, regretfully, that the market for suborbital travel is just not there.
  • Visiting a shrimp festival in Louisiana, Roads and Kingdoms considers how the fisheries work with the oil industry (or not).
  • Towleroad reports on the apparent abduction in Chechnya of singer Zelimkhan Bakayev, part of the anti-gay pogrom there.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that rebuilding Kaliningrad as a Russian military outpost will be expensive.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Centauri Dreams considers the idea of dispatching a fleet of sail-equipped probes to map the asteroid belt.
  • Crux considers the importance of the invention of zero for mathematics.
  • D-Brief notes that Scotland’s oldest snow patch is set to melt imminently.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper looking at the stability of multiplanetary systems in star clusters.
  • Imageo notes the modest recovery of icecaps in the Arctic this summer.
  • Language Log notes the importance of Kazakhstan’s shift to using the Latin script for the Kazakh language.
  • The LRB Blog reports on a writer’s visit to Helsinki.
  • The Map Room Blog notes a giant relief map of Guatemala, built to reinforce claims to what is now Belize.
  • The NYR Daily considers the continued salience of race in the fragile liberal-democratic world, in America and Europe.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders if the heavy-handed Spanish government is trying to trigger Catalonian independence.
  • Roads and Kingdoms considers the palm wine of Senegal, and its vendors.
  • Understanding Society considers the Holocaust, as an experience sociological and otherwise.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy makes a libertarian case for open borders.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi celebrates his meeting mutual fan Alison Moyet.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Belarus’ cautious Belarusianization is met by Russia’s pro-Soviet nostalgia.