A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘genocide

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

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  • Centauri Dreams considers the idea of dispatching a fleet of sail-equipped probes to map the asteroid belt.
  • Crux considers the importance of the invention of zero for mathematics.
  • D-Brief notes that Scotland’s oldest snow patch is set to melt imminently.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper looking at the stability of multiplanetary systems in star clusters.
  • Imageo notes the modest recovery of icecaps in the Arctic this summer.
  • Language Log notes the importance of Kazakhstan’s shift to using the Latin script for the Kazakh language.
  • The LRB Blog reports on a writer’s visit to Helsinki.
  • The Map Room Blog notes a giant relief map of Guatemala, built to reinforce claims to what is now Belize.
  • The NYR Daily considers the continued salience of race in the fragile liberal-democratic world, in America and Europe.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer wonders if the heavy-handed Spanish government is trying to trigger Catalonian independence.
  • Roads and Kingdoms considers the palm wine of Senegal, and its vendors.
  • Understanding Society considers the Holocaust, as an experience sociological and otherwise.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy makes a libertarian case for open borders.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi celebrates his meeting mutual fan Alison Moyet.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how Belarus’ cautious Belarusianization is met by Russia’s pro-Soviet nostalgia.
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[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares stunning deep-field pictures of intergalactic space.
  • Centauri Dreams shares the second part of Larry Klaes’ analysis of Forbidden Planet.
  • D-Brief suggests that controlled kangaroo hunting may be necessary for the ecological health of Australia.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes a new radio telescope in British Columbia that may help solve the mystery of fast radio burst.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes that quasars can irradiate a noteworthy fraction of potentially Earth-like planets.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money comes out against the idea of giving Amazon massive tax breaks for HQ2.
  • The LRB Blog bids a fond farewell to Saturn probe Cassini.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a paper suggesting new ideas–hence, new sources of economic growth–are harder to come by.
  • Maximos62 recounts a quietly chilling trip to East Timor where he discovers a landscape marked by genocide.
  • The New APPS Blog is quite unsurprised by news that Russians may have used Facebook to manipulate the US election.
  • At Out of Ambit, Diane Duane bids a fond farewell to colleague Len Wein.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw does not think Australia is committed enough to affordable housing to solve homelessness Finland-style.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports from the Suwalki Gap, the thin corridor joining the Baltic States to Poland.
  • Peter Rukavina looks at how a storied land rover was recovered from St. Helena.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel lists the top six discoveries of Cassini at Saturn.
  • Towleroad notes fundamentally misaimed criticism of new AI that determines sexual orientation from facepics.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at contemporary Russian fears about the power of rising China in Russia’s Asian territories.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • At Antipope, Charlie Stross considers the ways in which Big Data could enable an updated version of 1984.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at all the ways in which this photo of galaxy NGC 5559 is cool, with a supernova and more.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly shares a week of her life as a professional writer.
  • Crooked Timber looks at the potentially dominant role of racism as a political marker in the US.
  • Far Outliers notes that the Confederacy’s military options circa 1864 were grim and limited.
  • Language Log shares an example of a Starbucks coffee cup with biscriptal writing from Shenyang.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that the Rohingya are being subjected to genocide. What next?
  • Marginal Revolution notes the introduction of a new chocolate, ruby chocolate“.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw has it with ideological divisions of left and right.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer looks at the remarkably intemperate Spanish court decision that kicked off modern separatism in Catalonia.
  • Charley Ross looks at the sad story of missing teenager Brittanee Drexel.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel notes that now is an excellent time to start highlighting the politics of climate change.
  • Towleroad mourns New York City theatre star Michael Friedman.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the ways in which Russia is, and is not, likely to use the military.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares a map of the regional languages of France.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the emergent evidence for exomoon Kepler-1625b-I.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the future of technological civilizations: what if they do not always ascend, but stagnate?
  • D-Brief takes issue with the idea of the “digital native.” Everyone needs to adopt new technology at some point.
  • Are Elon Musk and Space-X backing away from the Mars colony plans? The Dragon’s Tales notes.
  • The Map Room Blog links to a map of massacres of Aborigines on the Australian frontiers.
  • Marginal Revolution wonders if widespread roboticization really will increase productivity much.
  • Roads and Kingdoms reports on the traditional rum of Newfoundland.
  • Drew Rowsome likes a new Toronto show, Permanence, in part for its take on male sexuality and sexual presence.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog notes that Russia leads the world in cat ownership.
  • Strange Company reports on coin-collecting 1920 cat Peter Pan Wass.
  • Understanding Society takes a look at the potential conflicts between “contingency” and “explanation.”
  • The Volokh Conspiracy looks at how a Nassau County legislator wants to block a Roger Waters conconcert because of his support for an Israel boycott.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Chinese outnumber Jews in the Far East’s Jewish Autonomous Oblast. (Not many of both, mind.)

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • At Antipope, Charlie Stross wonders–among other things–what the Trump Administration is getting done behind its public scandals.
  • blogTO notes a protest in Toronto aiming to get the HBC to drop Ivanka Trump’s line of fashion.
  • Dangerous Minds reflects on a Talking Heads video compilation from the 1980s.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reflects on a murderous attack against Indian immigrants in Kansas.
  • The LRB Blog looks at “post-Internet art”.
  • Lovesick Cyborg notes an attack by a suicide robot against a Saudi warship.
  • Strange Maps links to a map of corruption reports in France.
  • Torontoist reports on Winter Stations.
  • Understanding Society engages in a sociological examination of American polarization, tracing it to divides in race and income.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes the many good reasons behind the reluctance of cities around the world to host the Olympics.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that where the Ingush have mourned their deportation under Stalin the unfree Chechens have not, reports that Latvians report their willingness to fight for their country, looks at what the spouses of the presidents of post-Soviet states are doing, and notes the widespread opposition in Belarus to paying a tax on “vagrancy.”
  • Arnold Zwicky looks at the linguistic markers of the British class system.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • Bad Astronomy shares a video imagining of how Cassini will meet its end with Saturn.
  • Cody Delistraty shares an interview with Rebecca Solnit.
  • Far Outliers reports on Margaret Thatcher’s unorthodox campaign in 1979.
  • Joe. My. God. shares Hillary Clinton’s thanks to her 66 million voters.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at gender stereotypes among scientists.
  • The NYRB Daily talks about the visual art of Pipilotti Rist.
  • Otto Pohl commemorates the 73rd anniversary of the deportation of the Kalmyks.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests China might follow Russia’s Crimea strategy in invading Taiwan, and looks at the latest on controversies about Tatar identity and genetics.

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

  • Centauri Dreams looks at the advanced microelectronics that might last a space probe the two decades it would take to get to Proxima Centauri.
  • Dangerous Minds links to a 1980 filmed concert performance by Queen.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze reports on the discovery of potassium in the atmosphere of WASP-17b.
  • Language Hat looks at the Carmina of Optatianus, an interesting piece of Latin literature.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reports on the shameless anti-democratic maneuvering of the Republicans in North Carolina.
  • The LRB Blog reflects on the shamelessness of the perpetrators of the Aleppo massacres.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at what Charles Darwin’s reading habits have to say about the man’s process of research.
  • North!’s Justin Petrone looks at the elves of Estonia.
  • The NYRB Daily praises the new movie Manchester by the Sea.
  • The Planetary Society Blog shares a recent photo of Phobos.
  • Peter Rukavina argues that the Island’s low PISA scores do not necessarily reflect on what Islanders have learned.
  • Savage Minds shares an essay by someone who combines academic work with library work.
  • Torontoist notes the city’s subsidies to some major water polluters.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the anniversary of some important riots in Kazakhstan.
  • Arnold Zwicky reflects on the penguin-related caption of a photo on Wikipedia that has made the world laugh.