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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘geopolitics

[BLOG] Some Saturday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes the discovery of activity on distant comet
    C/2017 K2.
  • Centauri Dreams notes a new proposal for an orbital telescope that could detect Earth-like worlds at Alpha Centauri A and B.
  • D-Brief notes a new research finding that chimpanzees can learn to use tools on their own, without teaching.
  • Dangerous Minds notes the interesting Detroit character of Gundella, the Green Witch of Detroit.
  • Language Log tries to decipher some garbled Hebrew at an American wedding.
  • The LRB Blog looks at the continued aftershocks, social and otherwise, from the recent earthquake in Mexico.
  • Marginal Revolution argues that North Korea is set to become more China’s problem than the United States’.
  • Roads and Kingdoms notes the simple pleasures of soy milk in China.
  • Seriously Science notes a study looking at the different factors in the personalities of cats.
  • Towleroad notes the recent discovery of an antibody effective against 99% or so variants of HIV.
  • Window on Eurasia argues Russian politics play a central role in getting Russophones in Ukraine to become Ukrainian.
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[ISL] Four links about Pacific islands, from Guam and Yap to Norfolk and blackbirding

  • North Korea’s nuclear threats seem not to have deterred tourists from Guam. Might they make the island’s tourism? Travel and Leisure reports.
  • As National Geographic observes, Yap–an island state of the Federated States of Micronesia–is increasingly caught between China and the US.
  • Can Norfolk Island, as proposed, actually break from Australia and join New Zealand? Does New Zealand want it? The Guardian describes this movement.
  • The Guardian notes that calls for recognition, even belated justice, by descendants of Melanesian slaves in Queensland are growing louder.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait shares stunning photos of Jupiter and its moons taken from the Earth.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly talks about the life lessons she has taken from her recent extended trip in Europe.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the testing, by a European team, of the InflateSail intended to remove debris from Earth orbit.
  • Crooked Timber takes a look at the historically messy interactions between democratic governance and economic policy.
  • Dangerous Minds notes that Trump is making use of LGBT people as pawns. I wish the conclusion was less frighteningly convincing.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to a paper on a recent search for exomoons, including the possible detection of Kepler 1625b I.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas considers what it means for a parent to look at their child in an era of technologically mediated vision.
  • In Medias Res’ Russell Arben Fox notes, from his personal experience, how Donald Trump just does not get scouting.
  • Language Log shares a report of how a Chinese man with synesthesia sees written language.
  • The LRB Blog notes how Isaiah Berlin predicted the Saudi-American alliance back in 1945.
  • Marginal Revolution notes a recent decline in regional income convergence in the United States. Causes?
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes the politics that went into costly subway design changes in Mexico City. (Line 12 does look nice.)
  • Strange Company notes the romance of the grave of the Mysterious Stranger in Alexandria, Virginia. Who was she?
  • Unicorn Booty notes that Jinks Monsoon will be voicing a Steven Universe character and is out as non-gendered.
  • Window on Eurasia notes growing controversy in Kyrgyzstan over a switch in Kyrgyz alphabets from Cyrillic to Latin.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • Crooked Timber’s John Quiggin considers imaginable ways to get carbon dioxide in the atmosphere down to 350 ppm by 2100.
  • Karen Sternheimer at the Everyday Sociology Blog considers the tenuous nature of the upper-middle class in America. How is downwards mobility to be avoided, even here?
  • Imageo shows the growth of a sunspot larger than the Earth.
  • Language Hat shares the story of how Manchu script came to be.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes that the working poor need protection from arbitrary and always-changing work schedules.
  • The LRB Blog notes the geopolitical scramble at the Horn of Africa, starting with bases in Djibouti.
  • The NYR Daily engages with an intriguing exhibition about the relationship between Henry James and paintings, and painting.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw engages with the classic 1937 Australian film, Lovers and Luggers.
  • Noel Maurer at The Power and the Money notes that one benefit of the trend towards greater informality in fashion is that time has been freed up, especially for women.
  • Peter Rukavina writes about his new Instagram account, hosting his various sketches.
  • Unicorn Booty notes the continuing problems with Germany’s adoption laws for same-sex couples.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy looks at how the Polish president saved the independence of Poland’s courts with his veto.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Russia is trying to mobilize the ethnic Russians of Lithuania, finally.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • James Bow talks about how Ontario aiming for experimental hydrogen-powered trains, not electric ones, is a mistake.
  • Marginal Revolution reports on the community that WalMart took to a West Virginia county it is now leaving.
  • Diane Duane shows an old novel proposal from 1999 that she found again, and is now dusting off.
  • Transit Toronto notes that the time-based transfer program on the St. Clair route is ending, after 12 years.
  • Unicorn Booty reports on the lavender scare of the 1950s in the United States.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes the strong use of repetition, as a literary device, in the Hebrew version particularly of Genesis.
  • Window on Eurasia wonders how the Russian-American relationship, one Russia has depended on in the past, will evolve.

[BLOG] Some Monday links

  • Anthropology.net notes on how a fossil tooth led eventually to the identification of the fourth Denisovan individual known.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly writes about reasons for people to travel solo.
  • The Dragon’s Tales’ Will Baird notes that the INF Treaty is on the verge of collapse.
  • Mathew Ingram uses a recent GIF of Trump with the Polish president’s wife to show how these lie and mislead.
  • Joe. My. God. notes a sharp collapse in London’s LGBT venues–more than half in the past decade!
  • Marginal Revolution reports on British actors who take up tutoring as a second job to support their careers.
  • The NYR Daily takes a look at the latest concerns of South Koreans regarding their northern neighbour.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw takes issue with proposed Australian government surveillance of the local Internet.
  • Progressive Download’s John Farrell dissects the origins of the false claim that Copernicus was a Catholic priest.
  • Unicorn Booty has a fantastic interview with a scholar, Jamie Bernthal, who makes a case for queer content in Agatha Christie.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that methane bubble explosions in Siberia could wreck Russian pipelines.

[NEWS] Five Fourth of July links, from holiday fireworks mayhem to alternate history to Trump

  • Strange Company shares some vintage stories of mayhem, mostly fireworks-related, from 4th of July celebrations a century ago.
  • In The Atlantic, Uri Friedman interviews Harry Turtledove about alternate history, starting with the possibility of a failed War of American Independence.
  • Tristin Hopper of the National Post shares a decidedly contrarian–Loyalist, even–take on the War of American Independence.
  • Jeff Stein of Vox argues that American liberals should not reject American independence, with its real radicalism and egalitarianism.
  • At VICE, Harry Cheadle interviews Mike Jakeman about the implications of the Trump disinterest in global leadership.