A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘geopolitics

[NEWS] Five links about ethnic conflict: language in Canada, wilderness, Catalonia, Czechs on Tibet

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  • CBC notes that major First Nations languages in Canada like Cree and Ojibwe may soon be supported by translators in the Canadian Parliament in Ottawa.
  • Julian Brave NoiseCat at VICE argues against an imagining of wilderness that imagines territories without indigenous peoples. Such too readily can enable abuse of the natural world.
  • Bloomberg notes how the Spanish authorities in Catalonia have overriden local governments and populations by transferring dispute art objects to a different Spanish region. This won’t end well.
  • Transitions Online notes how traditionally strong Czech support for Tibet and Tibetan exiles has been fading in recent years, with China becoming a bigger player.
  • Paul Wells at MacLean’s takes a look at what might be the latest round of the language debate in Montréal. How important are greetings? (I think, for the record, they might be more important than Wells argues.)
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[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • Architectuul considers the humanizing potential of brutalism in the context of a London filled with impersonal skyscrapers.
  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait looks at the ways the habitable-zone super-Earths of K2-18 reveal our solar system to be exceptional.
  • Centauri Dreams notes evidence for active plate tectonics in the ice crust of Europa, suggesting an ocean being replenished with nutrients and possibly suitable for life.
  • D-Brief notes the sourcing of the iron in the artifacts of the Bronze Act in meteorites.
  • Daily JSTOR reports on how Hollywood coped during the Red Scare of the 1950s.
  • Dangerous Minds notes the exciting discovery of tapes recording Devo jamming with David Bowie and Brian Eno.
  • Cody Delistraty considers if the restitution of artworks looted from once-colonized territories might not be a cheap substitute for deeper changes.
  • Language Hat shares a student essay comparing, during the First World War, the United States’ campaign against German and the German campaign against French.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money argues against a British nostalgia for monarchy and empire that overlooks the real injustices perpetrated at Britain’s imperial peak.
  • Lingua Franca notes the remarkable power of the #metoo movement.
  • The LRB Blog notes the exceptional complexity of the issue of Jerusalem, especially after Trump’s actions.
  • The Map Room Blog shares links to a variety of maps of the Halifax Explosion and its effects.
  • The NYR Daily looks at some of the legacies of the Salvadoran civil war.
  • Peter Watts makes an argument in favour of the dystopia in contemporary science fiction.
  • The Planetary Society Blog’s Emily Lakdawalla reports that South Korea is planning its first Moon expedition for 2020.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes that Argentina, at its peak, offered as good or even better chances for social mobility for immigrants than the United States.
  • Peter Rukavina shares a photograph showing the electronic system used by defunct Charlottetown nightclub Myron’s for dispensing drinks.
  • Towleroad reports on one consequence of Australia’s acceptance of gay marriage: Will Calvin Harris remix the Spice Girls song “2 Become 1”, as he promised?
  • Window on Eurasia shares a list of eight reasons explaining why Finland was unique in the former Russian Empire in maintaining its independence from Moscow.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

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  • James Bow shares a deeply personal memory about a streetcar stop by Queens Quay where his life was recently transformed.
  • D-Brief notes that antimatter is one byproduct of lightning. (Really.)
  • Daily JSTOR counsels against buying into the scam of “authenticity.”
  • Language Hat shares a 2005 essay by Patricia Palmer, talking about how the spread of English was intimately linked with imperialism, first in Ireland then overseas.
  • Erik Loomis at Lawyers, Guns and Money is strongly against Black Friday.
  • The NYR Daily notes that Donald Trump’s hardline policies are not going to help bring about change in Cuba.
  • Out There talks about how we are able to be pretty sure that interstellar asteorid ‘Oumuamua is not an extraterrestrial artifact.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer tries to imagine, economically, what an American Ontario would be like.
  • Roads and Kingdoms talks about some good local beer enjoyed in Chiapas.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel shares a list of ten scientific phenomena we should be thankful for, if we want to exist.
  • Arnold Zwicky shares a photo of his Christmas bell flowering maple.

[NEWS] Three clashes of ideologies: Sagan on religion and science, peace poppy, Russia and the West

  • Christopher Douglas writes at The Conversation about how the Carl Sagan novel Contact explores Sagan’s own perspective on the relationship between religion and science.
  • I’m not at all sure I agree with the argument of Rob Breakenridge that the “peace poppy”, the white poppy preferred by some anti-war protesters, tarnishes Remembrance Day. Global News has the report
  • Leonid Bershidsky argues that the involvement of Putin’s Russia in Western politics is best understood as a strategy to undermine the credibility of these institutions and countries. (Continental Europe is doing better than the US and UK.) Bloomberg has it.

Written by Randy McDonald

November 13, 2017 at 4:15 pm

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes that our first confirmed extrasolar visitor has been named, I/U2017 U1.
  • Centauri Dreams examines the dynamics allowing Enceladus to keep its subsurface water ocean.
  • Crooked Timber reacts to the alarming rift opening up between Saudi Arabia and its Shi’ite neighbours, including Lebanon and Iran.
  • D-Brief notes that the New Horizons team planners are seeking a new name for their next target, (486958) 2014 MU69.
  • Dangerous Minds takes a look at some of the greeting cards designed for American Greetings by Robert Crumb.
  • Hornet Stories notes the rise of explicitly homophobic and transphobic ideologues in Paraguay, and its implications for wider South America.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes growing Democratic strength in Washington State.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a New York Times map of the Virginia election for governor.
  • The NYR Daily looks how the brutally quick shutdown of DNAInfo and the Gothamist network reflects the generally parlous state of journalism (among other things).
  • Roads and Kingdoms takes a look at the humble momo, a breakfast food in (among other places) Bhutan.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel explains why quark fusion can never be a potent energy source.
  • Understanding Society celebrates its tenth anniversary.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the disinterest of most Russians in personally costly revolutionary actions.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Anthrodendum takes an extended look at sexual harassment in anthropology, drawing from #metoo.
  • Crooked Timber considers the so-called Amazon-Facebook-Google “trinet” set to take over from the free Internet.
  • Dead Things considers if the Americas could have been populated by early migration down the coast, the “kelp route”.
  • Samuel Hatmaker’s Lego portrait of RuPaul is profiled in Hornet Stories.
  • Language Hat considers an untranslatable poem of Pasternak.
  • Language Log notes how Manafort’s legal team confused “Cyprus” with “cypress”.
  • Robert Farley of Lawyers, Guns and Money shares an interview of his with the Indian consul-general in Houston on the nature of the latter’s work.
  • Tyler Cowen of Marginal Revolution argues blaming Facebook for electoral manipulation overlooks the responsibility of individual voters.
  • The NYR Daily notes that the Kurds have paid the price for Trump’s dealings with Iran.
  • Roads and Kingdoms explores the surprisingly living Central Cemetery of Vienna.
  • Drew Rowsome explores the literature of horror writer Robert Sherman.
  • Towleroad notes BPM, the Oscar-contending French film about the AIDS crisis in that country.
  • Window on Eurasia notes the oddness of a pledge by China to fight illegal migration by Chinese into Russia.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • Anthropology.net notes that interbreeding with Neanderthals restored ancient hominin DNA to homo sapiens.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at signs of planetary formation in cometary rings.
  • Bruce Dorminey notes a theory that advanced extraterrestrial civilizations could manipulate pulsars as beacons.
  • Hornet Stories explains what “intersex” means.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money considers the perhaps baffling appeal of Florida real estate at a time of climate change.
  • The LRB Blog considers the radical potential of asteroid mining. Could it help free us from resource scarcity? How should we manage it?
  • Marginal Revolution shares an argument that humans, through transporting life, are increasing biodiversity.
  • The NYR Daily argues that China has too many illusions over its “New Silk Road” initiatives.
  • Peter Rukavina examines the changing shades of green used by GO Transit.
  • Drew Rowsome really likes Toronto musical Bat Out of Hell.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at how different non-Russian languages are present on the streets of St. Petersburg.