A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘germany

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • Beyond the Beyond’s Bruce Sterling looks at the art scene in Istanbul.
  • Crooked Timber takes issue with Tyler Cowen’s support for school vouchers.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes signs that the ephemeral Martian lakes were temporary creations of methane outbursts, and considers how to use WISE to hunt for Planet Nine.
  • Far Outliers looks at Britain’s contracts with petty German states for soldiers.
  • The Frailest Thing’s Michael Sacasas looks at Trump in the context of the conflict between orality and literacy.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes Donald Trump’s complication of the United States’ China policy and reports that Seattle’s new minimum wage has apparently not led to job loss.
  • The LRB Blog reports on The Gambia on the eve of the elections.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that truth is essential for liberty and freedom.
  • From the Heart of Europe’s Nicholas Whyte looks at the strange history of an enclave on the border of Belfast.
  • pollotenchegg maps language in Ukraine.
  • Savage Minds announces that the blog will seek a new name, and that they are looking for suggestions.
  • Window on Eurasia notes that Russia’s fertility uptick will not alter the dynamics of population loss, and reports on a Russian radical’s astonishing suggestion that Russia is now in the same position versus Ukraine as Nazi Germany was versus Poland.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Centauri Dreams looks at signs of advanced technologies detectable by SETI searches.
  • D-Brief notes evidence of the domestication of turkeys in 4th and 5th century Mexico.
  • Dangerous Minds discusses a legendary 1985 concert by Einstürzende Neubauten.
  • Joe. My. God. notes the banning of Tila Tequila from Twitter.
  • Language Log looks about a Hebrew advertisement that makes use of apostrophes.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money bids farewell to one of its bloggers, Scott Eric Kauffman.
  • The LRB Blog notes that Israel is fine with anti-Semites so long as they are Zionists.
  • Marginal Revolution notes that Hillary Clinton won the most economically productive areas of the United States.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer suggests anti-sprawl legislation helped lose the recent election.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog notes Russia’s banning of LinkedIn.
  • Towleroad notes Ellen Degeneres’ winning of a Presidential honor medal.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Trump could be much less easy to handle than the Kremlin thinks, and looks at claims that small northern peoples are conspiring with foreigners.

[LINK] “Newly unearthed letter shows how Trump’s grandfather begged to stay in Germany”

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Via the National Post I found Ishaan Tharoor’s Washington Post article documenting how Donald Trump’s grandfather sought to escape deportation from his Rhineland homeland.

According to a bulletin by the Associated Press, the letter was penned in 1905 and was addressed to Prince Luitpold of Bavaria, a monarch who presided over a realm within the united German Empire. Trump beseeches the “well-loved, noble, wise and just” Bavarian royal not to deport him. Luitpold apparently decided to reject what Trump offered as a “most subservient request.” The document was recently identified by a local historian in a state archive.

Friedrich Trump reached the United States in 1885 when he was 16, after leaving his home town of Kallstadt, in what is now the southwestern German state of Rhineland-Palatinate. Although his arrival in New York City was like that of myriad other European immigrants seeking greater opportunity, his departure from Bavaria was illegal — he skipped mandatory military service in the kingdom’s armed forces and was formally stripped of Bavarian citizenship four years later.

Trump went on to make his fortune out west, including a stint running taverns and brothels amid the gold rush in Canada’s Yukon territory. He “mined the miners,” as one chronicler put it, and his Arctic restaurant became one of the more infamous institutions of the territory.

“For single men the Arctic has the best restaurant,” wrote a moralizing 19th-century journalist in the Yukon Sun. “But I would not advise respectable women to go there to sleep as they are liable to hear that which would be repugnant to their feelings and uttered, too, by the depraved of their own sex.”

Trump later returned east and made trips back to his homeland in the early 1900s, including one visit during which he met his eventual wife. Her homesickness compelled Trump to attempt to return to Kallstadt with all of his life savings. But his status as a draft dodger and noncitizen prompted a deportation order.

(He failed to escape the deportation order.)

Written by Randy McDonald

November 21, 2016 at 8:15 pm

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • blogTO notes that Toronto has its first Ethiopian food truck.
  • Beyond the Beyond considers the alien ocean of Europa.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the protoplanetary disks of brown dwarfs.
  • D-Brief notes that Saturn’s moon Dione may have a subsurface ocean.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze looks at how broadly Earth-like exoplanets form their atmospheres.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog wonders about the benefits of praising failure, as a sign of risk-taking.
  • Far Outliers notes how the English village became an imaginary eden.
  • Language Log looks at a Hong Kong legislator’s Sanskrit tattoo.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money notes one man’s upset with the announcement that Wonder Woman must have a bi past.
  • The LRB Blog considers controversy over electoral boundaries in the United Kingdom.
  • The Map Room Blog links to some maps showing the continuing divisions of post-reunification Germany.
  • Marginal Revolution looks at the limit of Danish “hygge”, coziness.
  • Seriously Science looks at the surgeries performed on fish.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

  • 3 Quarks Daily considers quantitative measures of linguistic diversity.
  • Bad Astronomy and the Planetary Society Weblog are both skeptical of the rumours of a 2015 SETI detection, while Marginal Revolution does not reach a conclusion.
  • blogTO shares an image of the condo tower that will rise above the former site of the World’s Biggest Bookstore.
  • Centauri Dreams reports on preliminary discussions of Stardot.
  • Dangerous Minds shares video of a 1982 Depeche Mode performance on Swedish television.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze considers the question of galactic habitability.
  • The Everyday Sociology Blog writes about the role of bullying in the enforcement of gender.
  • Language Log notes how bigoted language can infect an AI.
  • The Map Room Blog shares a map charting water flows in Germany.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw considers revelations that Greek statues were painted.
  • Noel Maurer wonders why Peña and Trump re meeting.
  • Window on Eurasia considers the import of the late Soviet “parade of sovereignties”.

[URBAN NOTE] “Would Germany Be Wealthier if Berlin Didn’t Exist?”

Feargus O’Sullivan at CityLab noted a recent study observing that Berlin, unique among major European capitals, is poorer than the national average. This does highlight Berlin’s particular problems, he suggests, but also notes the extent to which Germany outside of its capital is prosperous.

Germany would actually be better off without Berlin. That, at least, might be the skim-read conclusion to be drawn from a challenging new report from Cologne’s Institute of German Economy. The report, released Tuesday, notes that Germany’s per capita GDP would actually be higher if Berlin and its population were removed from national economic figures.

[. . .]

Before we look at why Germany’s figures skew differently, it’s worth looking more fully at the figures the report provides. They don’t, for instance, actually suggest any inherent relation between the size of a capital’s contribution to national GDP and the overall prosperity of a country. Of all capitals surveyed, it’s actually Athens that shows the greatest national dominance. If that city and its habitants were removed from national figures, then Greece’s GDP per capita would drop by 19.9 percent. The Paris region shows similar levels of national contribution: its absence would slash French per capita GDP by 15 percent. In the U.K., no London would mean a drop of 11.2 percent in per capita GDP. A Madrid-free Spain’s per capita GDP would drop by 6 percent, while even Rome—known for playing second fiddle to the economic powerhouse of the North Italian Plain—would cause Italy’s per capita GDP to drop 2.1 percent if it were removed from the country’s economy.

It’s only in Berlin that these figures appear to suggest Germany would actually be better off without it. Removing Berlin and its residents from German economic tallies would, according to the report, actually boost the country’s per capita GDP, albeit by a meager 0.2 percent.

The reasons for this are as distinctive as Berlin’s standalone negative performance. Certainly, a rather sluggish economy doesn’t help. Without its capital status, Berlin might be just another rustbelt city, an ex-industrial metropolis whose swing towards an economy based on the service, technology, tourism and creative sectors has (as so often is the case) failed to fully compensate for the decline of the city’s industrial base. It’s not for nothing that Berlin had until recently a reputation as a cheap place to live. Prices long remained low because jobs were often scarce and wages relatively meager. As of this July, Berlin’s unemployment rate of 9.5 percent was the second highest (after Bremen) of any German federal state. If there is a loser hidden behind Berlin’s relatively poor performance, it’s unemployed, underpaid Berliners who are struggling despite living cheek-by-jowl with the government of Europe’s most powerful country.

Berlin’s unusual performance is still arguably as much an example of the strength of Germany’s regions at the weaknesses of the city itself. While in other countries, capitals suck in all the wealth, talent and investment, Germany remains a mosaic of prosperous cities scattered throughout its territory. Its largest metropolitan area (as opposed to its largest city) is not Berlin but the huge Rhine-Ruhr region, an industrial conurbation that’s home to over 11 million residents. Munich and Hamburg are both major economic and cultural centers with higher median wealth than the capital, while the heart of continental Europe’s finance industry is in Frankfurt. The Federal Constitutional Court is in the modest city of Karlsruhe, while the city with the highest per capita GDP is actually Wolfsburg, home to Volkswagen.

Written by Randy McDonald

August 27, 2016 at 1:47 pm

[NEWS] Some Friday links

  • Bloomberg notes the closure of Poland’s frontier with Kaliningrad, looks at how Google is beating out Facebook in helping India get connected to the Internet, notes British arms makers’ efforts to diversify beyond Europe and examines the United Kingdom’s difficult negotiations to get out of the European Union, looks at the problems of investing in Argentina, looks at the complications of Germany’s clean energy policy, observes that the Israeli government gave the schools of ultra-Orthodox Jews the right not to teach math and English, examines the consequences of terrorism on French politics, and examines at length the plight of South Asian migrant workers in the Gulf dependent on their employers.
  • Bloomberg View notes Donald Trump’s bromance with Putin’s Russia, examines Melania Trump’s potential immigrant problems, and is critical of Thailand’s new anti-democratic constitution.
  • CBC looks at how some video stores in Canada are hanging on.
  • The Inter Press Service notes that the Olympic Games marks the end of a decade of megaprojects in Brazil.
  • MacLean’s approves of the eighth and final book in the Harry Potter series.
  • The National Post reports on a Ukrainian proposal to transform Chernobyl into a solar farm, and examines an abandoned plan to use nuclear weapons to unleash Alberta’s oil sands.
  • Open Democracy looks at the relationship between wealth and femicide in India, fears a possible coup in Ukraine, looks at the new relationship between China and Africa, examines the outsized importance of Corbyn to Britain’s Labour Party, and looks how Armenia’s defeat of Azerbaijan has given its veterans outsized power.
  • Universe Today notes proposals for colonizing Mercury, looks at strong support in Hawaii for a new telescope, and examines the progenitor star of SN 1987A.
  • Wired emphasizes the importance of nuclear weapons and deterrence for Donald Trump, and looks at how many cities around the world have transformed their rivers.