A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘germany

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • blogTO notes that a Toronto family known for its Christmas lights display may be forced to ratchet back by city inspectors.
  • Centauri Dreams notes the apparent discovery of Kuiper Belt objects around white dwarf WD 1425+540.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze links to one paper examining the possible orbital inclination of Proxima Centauri b, and points to another one speculating about upper limits to the masses of other exoplanets orbiting P_roxima Centauri.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money links to interviews with different historians noting how close the United States is to a scenario from 1930s Germany.
  • The LRB Blog notes that the actions of the American deep state to undermine elements of the Trump Administration seen as potentially threatening will certainly also undermine American democracy.
  • Personal Reflections’ Jim Belshaw looks at reasons for the continuing gap in life outcomes between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer links to a paper looking at the effect of Huey Long’s populism on Louisiana’s economy, noting that he had little effect on the markets. This suggests that counting on the markets to reign in populists before the crash may be a mistake.
  • Strange Maps links to a map and history of the Gagauz of Moldova.
  • Torontoist looks at the continuing decline of live music venues in Toronto.
  • Towleroad notes the origins of Der Spiegel‘s cover art showing Trump with the severed head of lady liberty in a Cuban exile’s work.
  • Window on Eurasia notes differences between how Russians and Americans think about ethnicity and citizenship in their diverse societies.

[BLOG] Some Sunday links

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  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly describes a week in her life as a freelance writer.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes how the Indus Valley Civilization did, and did not, adapt to climate change.
  • Language Log reshares Benjamin Franklin’s writings against German immigration.
  • The NYRB Daily follows one family’s quest for justice after the shooting by police of one Ramarley Graham.
  • The Russian Demographics Blog looks at the Pale of Settlement.
  • Torontoist looks at Ontario’s food and nutrition strategy.
  • Transit Toronto reports on how PRESTO officials will be making appearances across the TTC in coming weeks to introduce users to the new system.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at how ethnic minorities form a growing share of Russian emigration, looks at the manipulation of statistics by the Russian state, and suggests Putin’s actions have killed off the concept of a triune nation of East Slavs.

[MUSIC] Deutsch Amerikanische Freundschaft, “Der Mussolini”

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This live version of Deutsch Amerikanische Freundschaft‘s “Der Mussolini” has been playing in my head all week.

Geh’ in die Knie
Und klatsch’ in die Hände
Beweg’ deine Hüften
Und tanz’ den Mussolini
Tanz’ den Mussolini
Tanz’ den Mussolini

Written by Randy McDonald

February 2, 2017 at 11:59 pm

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • blogTO notes that Uniqlo will be giving away free thermal clothing tomorrow.
  • James Bow shares his column about the importance of truth.
  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly shares with us her mid-winter walk.
  • Centauri Dreams reports about cometary water.
  • Dangerous Minds shares German cinema lobby cards from the 1960s.
  • Language Hat talks about dropping apostrophes.
  • Language Log reports about lexical searches on Google.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money reports on the latest from Trump.
  • The NYRB Daily shares a review of an Iranian film on gender relations.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer notes the ongoing gas price protests in Mexico.
  • Spacing links to some articles about affordable housing around the world.
  • The Volokh Conspiracy notes Germany’s abolition of a law forbidding insults to foreign heads of state.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests that stable Russian population figures cover up a wholesale collapse in the numbers of ethnic Russians, and looks at the shortages of skilled workers faced by defense industries.

[LINK] “Berlin business leaders unimpressed with UK’s message”

BBC’s Damien McGuinness reports from Berlin about how two Brexiteers’ address to a conference of German business leaders, intended to secure decidedly United Kingdom-friendly terms, managed instead to fail. The profound misunderstanding of German intentions and German interests is almost painful to read about.

The distinguished audience members were too polite to heckle. But the eye rolling, frowns and audible tutting made it quite clear how the Brexiteers’ message was going down with German business leaders.
Owen Paterson, a former minister and Conservative MP, and John Longworth, co-chair of Leave Means Leave, came to Berlin on Saturday with a clear mission – to persuade German business leaders to lobby Chancellor Angela Merkel to give Britain a good trade deal.

They should have been on safe territory.

The two men are confident, witty speakers with impressive business and free-trade credentials.

Mr Longworth is a former head of the British Chamber of Commerce. Mr Paterson’s years spent trading in Germany meant he could open his address with a few remarks in German – which drew an appreciative round of applause – and a well-judged joke about multilingual trade.

But it turned out they had entered the lion’s den.

The laughter from the audience quickly turned to sniggers as they heard the UK described as “a beacon of open, free trade around the world”.

Westminster’s decision to leave the world’s largest free trade area does not look like that to Germany.
When Europe was blamed for spending cuts and a lack of British health care provision, there were audible mutters of irritation from the audience.

Written by Randy McDonald

January 23, 2017 at 10:00 pm

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

  • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly calls on journalists to stand up to Trump.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at exocomets.
  • Language Log shares an ad from the 1920s using the most vintage language imaginable.
  • Lawyers, Guns and Money talks about globalization as a mechanism for concentrating wealth at the top of the elite.
  • The LRB Blog talks about the ghosts of the Cold War in the contemporary world.
  • Marginal Revolution’s Tyler Cowen argues that Germany has its own responsibility in transatlantic relations.
  • The New APPS Blog looks at the importance of administrative law.
  • The NYRB Daily celebrates John Berger.
  • Savage Minds proposes a read-in of Michel Foucault in protest of Trump’s inauguration on the 20th.
  • Towleroad reports on the latest statistics on the proportions of LGBT people in the United States.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at the continuing depopulation of the Russian Far East and examines the shift to indigenous naming practices in Kyrgyzstan.

[LINK] “Putin Will Find Germany’s Elections Hard to Subvert”

Bloomberg View’s Leonid Bershidsky argues that, owing to the greater resilience of German politics and a more honest media environment among other things, any Russian involvement in Germany’s elections would have more limited results. Here’s hoping.

Merkel’s Achilles heel in this election is the refugee crisis of 2015. I doubt, however, that much unpublished kompromat exists on that: Merkel’s mistakes in handling the crisis were extensively covered by the German press. And unlike Americans, whose trust in the media is at a historic low, Germans still trust traditional media.

There’s a notable difference between the ways relatively conservative Germans and tech-crazy Americans get their news. Only 20 percent of Americans find it in newspapers; 57 percent of Germans still read a newspaper or a magazine every day. That means the effectiveness of fake news campaigns and social network echo chambers won’t be as high in Germany as it was in the U.S.

Besides, Germans are far more amenable to speech restrictions than Americans. Germany has hate speech laws that would be impossible under the First Amendment. Calls to outlaw fake news or prosecute those who spread it are coming from many quarters, especially from Merkel’s party, the Christian Democratic Union, and the other centrist political force — its coalition partner, the Social Democratic Party. Unlike in the U.S., the government in Germany has the ability to go after those who knowingly publish disinformation. A Russian TV journalist who reported on the fake rape earlier this year was briefly under investigation, though he wasn’t convicted.

On Tuesday, the leader of the Social Democrats, Vice Chancellor Sigmar Gabriel, posted a photo of a handwritten message on Twitter: “A fair fight! That’s how we must fight the 2017 election — not like in the U.S.! No fake news, no bashing, no insults.” Gabriel wrote “fake news” and “bashing” in English. Germany doesn’t even have the kind of echo chambers of anti-establishment opinion that amplified the anti-Clinton line in the U.S., where a propaganda effort could just use the existing channel that gorged on the additional content. In Germany, the channel itself would need to be built.

Written by Randy McDonald

December 14, 2016 at 7:15 pm