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Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘germany

[NEWS] Some Wednesday links

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  • Bloomberg looks at the restarting of northern Alberta oil, looks at the deterioration in Sino-Taiwanese relations, reports on how Norway is using oil money to buffer its economic shocks, and suggests low ECB rates might contribute to a property boom in Germany.
  • Bloomberg View notes the idea of a third party in the US, one on the right to counter Trump, will go nowhere.
  • The CBC notes the settlement of a residential school case in Newfoundland and Labrador and predicts a terrible fire season.
  • The Globe and Mail‘ Kate Taylor considers Canadian content rules in the 21st century.
  • The Inter Press Service notes that planned Kenyan closures of Somali refugee camps will have terrible results.
  • National Geographic looks at the scourge that is Pablo Escobar’s herd of hippos in Colombia.
  • The National Post notes VIA Rail’s existential need for more funding and reports on Jean Chrétien’s support of decriminalizing marijuana.
  • Open Democracy looks at controversies over Victory Day in Georgia, and notes the general impoverishment of Venezuela.
  • Vice looks at new, accurate dinosaur toys, feathers and all.
  • Wired explains why Israel alone of America’s clients can customize F-35s.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • The Dragon’s Gaze notes evidence that Kardashev Type III civilizations do not exist.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes the new Kenya-Somalia border war, suggests the United Arab Emirates will be building a mountain to try to trigger rain, and notes that the new French-built submarines of Australia will come with American tech parts.
  • Language Log looks at the changing meaning of “feel”.
  • Marginal Revolution suggests Russian power might be on an upswing and looks at European Union proposals to fine countries which do not accept refugees.
  • The NYRB Daily notes the controversy surrounding Poland’s Second World War museum at Gdansk.
  • The Planetary Society Blog looks at robotic activity around the solar system.
  • The Power and the Money’s Noel Maurer considers the question of whether or not Napoleonic rule did kickstart growth in western Germany.
  • Savage Minds continues the discussion of decolonizing anthropology.
  • Torontoist notes a protest tomorrow by Ontario parents unhappy that the provincial government will not cover enough of an effective autism program.
  • Window on Eurasia looks at class divisions in Russia and notes a proposal to divert water from Siberian rivers to China.

[DM] “On speculating about the effects of German labour market restrictions in 2004”

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I engage in alternate historical speculation at Demography Matters. What if Germany had not restricted its labour market to migrants from the new European Union member-states in 2004? What would Germany look like? Would we be having a Brexit referendum in the United Kingdom?

Written by Randy McDonald

May 3, 2016 at 11:59 pm

[NEWS] Some Wednesday links

  • The Associated Press notes the hostility in many American communities to Muslim cemeteries.
  • Bloomberg explores the revival of watchmaking in East Germany’s Saxony, and touches on the new two-day public work week in Venezuela.
  • Bloomberg View notes Japan’s rising levels of poverty, looks at the politicization of the Brazilian education system, and examines potential consequences of Pakistan-China nuclear collaboration.
  • The CBC reports on the difficulties of the Canada-European Union trade pact, reports on the conviction of an Alberta couple for not taking their meningitis-afflicted child to medical attention until it was too late, and notes that an American-Spanish gay couple was able to retrieve their child from a Thai surrogate mother.
  • MacLean’s examines how Karla Homolka ending up shifting towards French Canada.
  • The National Post‘s Michael den Tandt is critical of the idea of a new Bombardier bailout.
  • Universe Today notes a paper arguing that, with only one example of life, we can say little with assuredness about extraterrestrial life’s frequency.
  • Vice‘s Noisey notes how Prince and Kate Bush ended up collaborating on “Why Should I Love You?”.
  • The Washington Post reports on a study suggesting that root crops like the potato were less suited to supporting complex civilizations than grains.

[NEWS] Some Sunday links

  • The Atlantic notes Thailand’s “fake children”, life-sized dolls that are charms.
  • Bloomberg View considers the costs to the United Kingdom of Brexit and the costs and benefits of said to the European Union.
  • Discover looks at the increasingly appreciated place of South Africa in hominid origins.
  • The Inter Press Service examines the closure of Bedouin settlements in Israel.
  • MacLean’s celebrates the Yukon Gold potato’s 50th anniversary.
  • National Geographic looks at the growing number of problems faced by the baboons of Cape Town.
  • The New Yorker considers what might be in the suppressed 28 pages of the 9/11 report.
  • Phys.org maps Neanderthal and Denisovan ancestry worldwide.
  • Reuters notes the discovery of the first monkey fossils in North America.
  • Slate hosts an article complaining about the normalization of Berlin since reunification.
  • The Washington Post mourns the bleaching of nearly all of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef.

[BLOG] Some Friday links

  • blogTO notes the expansion of condo development further east on the waterfront.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes theropod dinosaurs were also good scavengers.
  • Language Hat shares translator jokes.
  • The LRB Blog reports on the relocation of some refugees on Chios to a camp.
  • Marginal Revolution links to a report suggesting that the misallocation of labour during the bubble is responsible for the slow recovery.
  • The NYRB Daily suggests the AfD marks the reintroduction of nationalism into German politics.
  • pollotenchegg maps demographic change in Ukraine in 2013.
  • Torontoist examines pioneering dentist John G.C. Adams.
  • Transit Toronto notes Bombardier’s delivery of the seventeenth streetcar.
  • Whatever’s John Scalzi points out, looking to North Carolina, that of course boycotts are supposed to hurt.
  • Window on Eurasia speculates that a Russian dissolution would not follow current political frontiers, and examines politics in the Republic of Karelia.

[BLOG] Some Thursday links

  • blogTO lists some old villages in Toronto swallowed up by urban expansion.
  • Centauri Dreams looks at the laser-launch proposal.
  • The Dragon’s Gaze considers the frequency of Neptune-class planets around metal-poor stars.
  • The Map Room Blog looks at the Vancouver Archives’ digitization of old maps.
  • Window on Eurasia suggests Russia is sponsoring paramilitaries in Germany and looks at underinvestment in Russia’s rail infrastructure.
  • The Financial Times‘ The World touches upon Donald Trump’s relationship with his mother’s Scotland.
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