A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘germany

[URBAN NOTE] Five cities links: Humboldt, Hamilton, Kingston, Berlin, Sidangkou

  • At MacLean’s, Meaghan Campbell reports on how the devastating crash of the Humboldt Broncos has hit that small Saskatchewan farm town.
  • Hamilton police announces the arrest of local anarchist Peter Hopperton in connection with the actions of a crowd bent on vandalism on that city’s Locke Street. CBC has it.
  • Queen’s University is participating in a summit with the city of Kingston on how students and long-term residents can be accommodated in the changing city. Global News reports.
  • Attacks by right-wing groups in the Berlin district of Neukölln make many locals worried. DW reports.
  • The small Chinese centre of Sidangkou, in the area of Tianjin, has become a world centre of saxophone production. The New York Times reports.
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    [BLOG] Some Tuesday links

    • Kambiz Kamrani at Anthropology.net notes new research suggesting that all modern Australian Aborigine languages descend from a single ancestor more than ten thousands years ago.
    • The Broadside Blog’s Caitlin Kelly considers the search for one’s spiritual home.
    • Centauri Dreams notes the planned ESA ARIEL mission, intended to study exoplanet formation and atmospheres.
    • Crooked Timber considers the prospects for the university in the United Kingdom, post-strike.
    • D-Brief notes a study suggesting the worlds of TRAPPIST-1 might be too wet, too water-rich, to sustain life.
    • Cody Delistraty shares an interview with Nancy Jo Sales on everything from childhood to Facebook.
    • Dead Things notes the discovery of human footprints on the seafloor off of British Columbia, predating the Ice Age.
    • Bruce Dorminey notes the possibility that ocean worlds in the “ice cap zone” could manage to support life
    • Drew Ex Machina takes a look at the observations to date of near-Jovian analogue world Epsilon Indi Ab.
    • The Dragon’s Tales notes ambitious plans by one private space development company to set up a functioning cislunar economy.
    • Hornet Stories notes the upcoming re-release of Garbage’s second album, Version 2.0.
    • In A State of Migration’s Lyman Stone takes a look at the regional origins of German immigrants to the US in the mid-19th century.
    • Joe. My. God. notes that Grindr shares private user data with third parties that, among other things, would allow them to determine the HIV status of different individuals.
    • JSTOR Daily notes the struggle for equal civil rights in Alaska, as indigenous people fought for equality.
    • The NYR Daily reports on an interesting exhibit of post-Second World War modern art from Germany.

    [BLOG] Some Thursday links

    • Centauri Dreams shares a proposal for unmanned probe missions to future incoming extrasolar asteroids like ‘Oumuamua.
    • The Crux considers, in the context of recent (perhaps surprising) context, how scientists will one day record dreams.
    • Hornet Stories shares the report on a poll of younger gay people about the idea of monogamous relations versus open ones, suggesting there are signs a strong preference for monogamy isn’t well thought out.
    • Imageo notes that global warming, by leading to the breakup of icecaps, will worsen the sea ice hazard to maritime shipping.
    • JSTOR Daily notes how social workers are called to support serious social reform.
    • Language Hat notes a monument to the Cyrillic alphabet erected in Antarctica by Bulgarians.
    • In the era of Trump, Lingua Franca takes a look at the origin of the phrase “useful idiots”.
    • Marginal Revolution notes a recent article observing the decline of German cuisine in the United States. Who, or what, will save it?
    • At the Planetary Society Blog, Emily Lakdawalla talks about the latest exciting discoveries from Titan, including the odd distribution of nitrogen in its atmosphere and surface.
    • Towleroad notes how the discomfort of Ben Carson with transgender people leads him to consider the needs of homeless transgender people as secondary to this discomfort.
    • Window on Eurasia suggests that Cossacks in Russia are close to gaining recognition as a separate people.
    • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell suggests–jokes?–that intellectual history from 1900 can be explained substantially in terms of the uncritical adoption of a nomad science, starting from race science and continuing to today with Harry Potter.
    • Arnold Zwicky shares a post reporting on a PhD student’s thesis, studying features of Chicano English.

    [NEWS] Five notes on food: pork in Germany, California agriculture, NL clam, Maine lobster, food box

    • Pork consumption in Germany is dropping, a consequence of changing demographics and changing dietary preferences. Bloomberg reports.
    • Raids on illegal immigrants by ICE have the potential to badly hurt agriculture in California. Bloomberg reports.
    • The story of how an effort to open up the Arctic surf clam fishery of Newfoundland, particularly to natives and non-natives alike became a big mess is sad. The National Post reports.
    • Apparently, to cope with injuries and chronic pain, the lobster fishers of Maine are coping by using heroin. Is this going on in Atlantic Canada, too? VICE reports.
    • Things like the Trump plan to substantially replace fresh foods with boxed non-perishable goods in food stamp problems have happened to Native Americans already. The dietary and health consequences are significantly negative. NPR reports.

    [NEWS] Five notes about migration: Albania, Venezuela, Latvia, Namibia and East Germany, Yunnan

    • This report from the Osservatorio Balcani e Caucaso noting the sheer scale of emigration in parts of rural Albania, proceeding to the point of depopulating entire territories, tells a remarkable story.
    • This opinion suggesting that, due to the breakdown of the economy of Venezuela, we will soon see a refugee crisis rivaling Syria’s seems frighteningly plausible.
    • Politico Europe notes that, in the case of Latvia, where emigration has helped bring the country’s population down below two million, there are serious concerns.
    • OZY tells the unexpected story of hundreds of young Namibian children who, during apartheid, were raised in safety in Communist East Germany.
    • Many Chinese are fleeing the pollution of Beijing and other major cities for new lives in the cleaner environments in the southern province of Yunnan. The Guardian reports.

    [URBAN NOTE] Five city links: New York City, Shenzhen and Guangzhou, Berlin, Amsterdam, Istanbul

    • What does the impending demolition of the venerable Union Carbide tower, at 270 Park Avenue, to make way for a new ultratall skyscraper say about changing New York City? New York reports.
    • The South China Morning Post observes how the cities of Shenzhen and Guangzhou, though still behind Hong Kong, are starting to advance past it as a result of these cities’ sustained investment in innovative technologies.
    • Aldi in Berlin will apparently build affordable student housing on top of at least some of its new discount food stores in Berlin. Bloomberg reports.
    • This VICE article looking at the lives of lonely people in Amsterdam, many newcomers, is affecting.
    • The Crisis Group looks at how Syrian refugees, of diverse ethnicities and religions, are finding a new home in the multiethnic Istanbul neighbourhood of Sultangazi.

    [BLOG] Some Friday links

    • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait tells us what tantalizing little is known about Proxima Centauri and its worlds.
    • Centauri Dreams imagines that, for advanced civilizations based on energy-intensive computing, their most comfortable homes may be in the cool dark of space, intergalactic space even.
    • D-Brief notes an effort to predict the evolution of stick insects that went in interesting, if substantially wrong, directions.
    • Mark Graham notes that, in the developing world, the supply of people willing to perform digital work far outweighs the actual availability of jobs.
    • Mathew Ingram announces that he is now chief digital writer for the Columbia Journalism Review.
    • JSTOR Daily explores how consumerism was used, by the United States, to sell democracy to post-war West Germany.
    • Language Hat explores the script of the Naxi, a group in the Chinese Himalayas.
    • Paul Campos considers at Lawyers, Guns and Money the importance of JK Galbraith’s The Affluent Society. If we are richer than ever before and yet our living standards are disappointing, is this not the sort of political failure imagined?
    • Russell Darnley takes a look at how the death of a community’s language can lead to the death of that community’s ecosystem.
    • Jason Davis at the Planetary Society Blog considers the possibility of the ISS being replaced by privately-owned space stations.
    • Dmitry Ermakov at Roads and Kingdoms shares some photos from his ventures among the Finno-Ugric peoples of Russia.
    • Peter Rukavina shares a black-and-white photo of Charlottetown harbour covered in ice.
    • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel makes the point that cancelling NASA’s WFIRST telescope would kneecap NASA science.