A Bit More Detail

Assorted Personal Notations, Essays, and Other Jottings

Posts Tagged ‘glbt issues

[NEWS] Five LGBTQ links: Toronto, Daniel Mallory Ortberg, Melvin Iscove, Michelle Visage, drag kings

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  • People interviewed by front-line police regarding the Church-Wellesley serial killer affair suggest that, if there was any problem, it was certainly not with the sensitive and informed front-line officers. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Heather Havrilesky at The Cut interviews Daniel Mallory Ortberg and, in so doing, celebrates his outing himself as trans.
  • The medical license of Dr. Melvin Iscove, who as a psychiatrist practiced conversion therapy without quite admitting to it, has been suspended following findings that he had sex with his male patients. The Toronto Star reports.
  • In a wide-ranging interview, E. Alex Jung talks with Michelle Visage about RuPaul’s drag ace, her life, and the changing lines between gay and trans, gender and sexuality, that she has seen since the 1980s, over</a at Vulture.
  • Hazel Cills at Jezebel takes a look at drag kings. I’d not heard of them in a while: What are they doing? What is this genderbending cultural form evolving into? They need more prominence.

[BLOG] Some Tuesday links

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  • At Anthropology.net, Kambiz Kamrani notes evidence that Australopithecus africanus suffered the same sorts of dental issues as modern humans.
  • Architectuul considers, in the specific context of Portugal, a project by architects seeking to create new vehicles and new designs to enable protest.
  • Bad Astronomy’s Phil Plait looks at HD 34445, a Sun-like star somewhat older than our own that has two gas giants within its circumstellar habitable zone. Could these worlds have moons which could support life?
  • James Bow celebrates Osgoode as Gold, the next installment in the Toronto Comics anthology of local stories.
  • At Crooked Timber, Henry Farrell in the wake of Italian elections revisits the idea of post-democratic politics, of elections which cannot change things.
  • D-Brief notes that monkeys given ayahuasca seem to have been thereby cured of their depression. Are there implications for humans, here?
  • Dangerous Minds notes the facekini, apparently a popular accessory for Chinese beach-goers.
  • Imageo notes the shocking scale of snowpack decline in the western United States, something with long-term consequences for water supplies.
  • JSTOR Daily notes a paper suggesting that the cultivation of coffee does not harm–perhaps more accurately, need not harm–biodiversity.
  • Robert Farley at Lawyers, Guns and Money notes the potential of the United States to start to extricate itself from the ongoing catastrophe in Yemen.
  • The NYR Daily features an interview with photographer Dominique Nabokov about her photos of living rooms.
  • Drew Rowsome writes a mostly-positive review of the new drama Rise, set around a high school performance of Spring Awakening. If only the lead, the drama teacher behind the production, was not straight-washed.
  • Starts With A Bang’s Ethan Siegel makes the case that there are only three major types of planets, Terran and Neptunian and Jovian.
  • Towleroad notes the awkward coming out of actor Lee Pace.
  • Worthwhile Canadian Initiative suggests one way to try to limit the proliferation of guns would be to engineer in planned obsolescence, at least ensuring turnover.
  • Yorkshire Ranter Alex Harrowell U>notes that one of his suggestions, ensuring that different national governments should have access to independent surveillance satellites allowing them to accurately evaluate situations on the ground, is in fact being taken up.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: Metrolinx, police and Pride, Freeman Formalwear,, BMO, Bentway

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  • Steve Munro reports on the latest report about upcoming Metrolinx stations.
  • Understandably, the Church and Wellesley serial killer investigation is making the efforts of Toronto police to march in Pride problematic. (As it should.) The Globe and Mail reports.
  • blogTO notes that the old Freeman Formalwear building on 556 Yonge, just below Wellesley, has been demolished following a fire.
  • The Bank of Montreal is going to transform a huge chunk of the old Sears store in the Eaton Centre, southwest of Yonge and Dundas, into an urban campus employing thousands. The Toronto Star reports.
  • The Bentway, underneath the Gardiner, is set to become a public art space. The Globe and Mail reports.

[NEWS] Six LGBTQ links: violence, The 519, William Whitehead, art, pink triangle, Janelle Monáe

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  • I have been sitting on, thinking of, this R.M. Vaughan essay in The Globe and Mail reflecting on the high levels of violence queer men have to deal with for some time. All I can say, really, is that in the years I’ve lived in Toronto, I’ve felt what I’ve come to realize is a sense of safety that I never had living on PEI. The essay is here.
  • The Globe and Mail reports on how the 519 Community Centre, in Church and Wellesley, is facing criticism that it has lost touch with its roots in the LGBTQ communities, especially marginalized ones.
  • William Whitehead, a writer of documentaries for CBC perhaps most famous as the partner of the late Canlit giant Timothy Findley, died this past week. The Globe and Mail eulogizes.
  • CBC reports on a new exhibition of queer art in Thunder Bay.
  • The Forward reports on how, in the middle of the AIDS epidemic, artist Avram Finkelstein repurposed the pink triangle of the Nazis into an iconic badge for our era.
  • As Janelle Monáe continues moving on out (she seems to have a nice girlfriend), Vulture looks at the interesting trope of bisexual lighting.

[URBAN NOTE] Five Toronto links: architecture, cryptocurrency condos, crime, police

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  • Toronto Storeys shares the opinions of six architects as to their favourite buildings in the city.
  • Why is one condo owner in Toronto only accepting bitcoin payments from potential purchasers? Among other things, it makes things relatively easier for foreign buyers. CBC reports.
  • Marcel Theriault, one of the policeman accused of brutally beating Dafonte Miller, is also accused of misleading Durham Region police investigators. The Toronto Star reports.
  • University of Toronto doctoral student Sasha Reid identified the pattern of a serial killer at work in Toronto’s LGBTQ community, and told police. Their response? They thanked her and moved on. The Toronto Star reports.
  • Edward Keenan wonders why Toronto Police Chief Mark Saunders possibly thought he could say what he said about the community not helping, especially when the community has been warning about a serial killer while police denied anything. The Toronto Star has the article.

[BLOG] Some Wednesday links

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  • Bad Astronomer Phil Plait notes that a recent massive flare at Proxima Centauri, one that made the star become a thousand times brighter, not only makes Proxima b unlikely to be habitable but makes it unlikely Proxima has (as some suggested) a big planetary system.
  • The Dragon’s Tales notes that South Korea, contrary to earlier reports, is not going to ban cryptocurrency.
  • Hornet Stories notes that six American states–Arkansas, Indiana, Kentucky, Missouri, Montana, and Oklahoma–have seen the introduction of legislation replacing marriage with a marriage contract, on account of marriage equality.
  • JSTOR Daily reports on the deep similarities and differences between serfdom in Russia and slavery in the United States, both formally abolished in the 1860s.
  • Language Hat links to a Telegraph article reporting on the efforts of different people to translate different ancient languages.
  • The New APPS Blog notes that, after Delta dropped its discount for NRA members, the pro-NRA governor of Georgia dropped tax breaks for the airline.
  • This call for the world to respond to the horrors in Syria, shared at the NYR Daily, is likely to fall on deaf ears.
  • At Strange Maps, Frank Jacobs shares some maps showing areas where the United States is truly exceptional.
  • Supernova Condensate notes how nested planetary orbits can be used to trace beautiful spirograph patterns.
  • Window on Eurasia notes how no one in the Soviet Union in 1991 was prepared to do anything to save the Soviet Union.

[URBAN NOTE] Five city links: New York City, Montréal, Hong Kong, Paris, Narva

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  • Hornet Stories has a list of some of the key LGBTQ destinations in New York City. This is something for my next trip, I think.
  • Robert Everett-Green writes about the transformation of Montréal’s Viauville, once a model neighbourhood funded by 19th century cookie magnate Charles-Théodore Viau, over at The Globe and Mail.
  • Hong Kong is exceptionally pressed for space for housing, making land for commerce all the more difficult to come by. Bloomberg reports</u/.
  • France is planning to make a suburban wasteland in the northeast of the conurbation of Paris over into a vast forest. CityLab reports.
  • DW reports on how, one hundred years after Estonia first became independent, the country’s Russophones, particularly concentrated in the northeastern city of Narva, are now engaging with (and being engaged by) the wider country.